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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

African Portuguese Cabbage Stew Recipe

African Portuguese Cabbage Stew Recipe

African Portuguese Food
Portuguese food heavily influences African food; one popular recipe is Portuguese Cabbage Stew. African Portuguese food recipe cabbage stew is healthy and food budget friendly.

Healthy Food Life


Portuguese Cabbage Stew Recipe

African Portuguese Cabbage Stew Recipe


Portuguese food heavily influences African food; one popular recipe is Portuguese Cabbage StewPortuguese is spoken in a number of African countries and is the official language in six African states: Angola, Mozambique, Guinea-Bissau, Cabo Verde (Cape Verde), São Tomé and Príncipe and Equatorial Guinea. Many Africans speak Portuguese as a second language.

Access to goods such as fabrics, spices, and gold and ivory fueled the Portuguese down the coast of West Africa to Sierra Leone in 1460. Portugal dominated the slave trade for nearly 200 years, from 1415 into the 1600s. Portuguese food heavily influences African food; one popular recipe is Portuguese Cabbage Stew.


Portuguese Cabbage Stew


Ingredients:
½ head green cabbage, chopped
2 onions, finely chopped
4 cloves garlic, crushed
2 tablespoons olive oil
6 white potatoes, diced
2 cups vegetable stock
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
1 chopped hot pepper
2 bay leaves

Directions:
In a large pot fry the onions and garlic in the olive oil until softened and translucent, add potatoes. Add remaining ingredients except cabbage, simmer covered 15 minutes. Add cabbage simmer 6 minutes more. Serve with bread.


Food for thought


The Portuguese language is the third most spoken western language after English and Spanish.  

Portuguese (Português) is spoken in Portugal, Brazil, Angola, Mozambique, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, São Tomé e Principe, East Timor and Macau.



African Portuguese did you knows


Did you know? In Angola, 71 percent of the African population speak Portuguese as a first language.

Did you know? In Mozambique, 10 percent of the African population speak Portuguese as a first language.

Did you know? In Cabo Verde (Cape Verde), 100 percent of the African population speak Portuguese as a first language.

Did you know? Many Africans speak Portuguese as a second language.

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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

South African Veggie Bunny Chow Recipe

South African Fast Food


Bunny Chow is classic Durban South African fast food. Bunny Chow is usually called 'bunny' and makes a glorious mess when eaten.


South African Veggie Bunny Chow Recipe


Ingredients:
2 whole hollowed out loaves of bread cut in half
Bunny Chow is classic Durban South African fast food.
South African Fast Food
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 cups vegetable stock
1 medium onion chopped
2 medium ripe tomatoes, chopped
2 large potatoes cut in cubes
½ cup cooked green beans and carrots
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ teaspoon fennel seeds
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 bay leaf
2 teaspoons ground curry powder
1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh ginger
1 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
3 curry leaves
Salt to taste

Directions:

Add all ingredients except the bread, stock and chicken and sauté for 3 minutes over medium heat.  Add remaining ingredients; simmer until the potatoes are soft 20 minutes. Spoon mixture into the hollowed out bread and serve warm.

South African Veggie Bunny Chow Recipe




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Monday, November 28, 2016

Africa Luxurious Train Safari

Rovos Rail Blue Train


Luxurious train safari across sub-Saharan Africa


Africa Luxurious train safari across sub-Saharan Africa
Africa Luxurious train 
Rovos Rail also known as The Pride of Africa is a restored luxury vintage steam train company with a unique 3,000-mile journey across sub-Saharan Africa. Rohan Vos with a locomotive and seven carriages started the Rovos Rail company on April 29, 1989.

The most luxurious train carriage of South Africa's Rovos Rail is the Blue Train. It has private two-person compartments and runs between Cape Town and Pretoria and costs for a deluxe suite start at 15,155 rand, about $1,500 US Dollars per person printed after year 2001.


African Luxurious train safari across sub-Saharan Africa
Train safari across sub-Saharan Africa
The 15-day 3,025 mile private rail tour aboard Rovos Rail ultimate luxury trek is from Cape Town South Africa to Dar es Salaam Tanzania. Rovos Rail, the Pride of Africa, stretches across South Africa and Botswana, touches Zimbabwe at Victoria Falls, and crosses Zambia to Tanzania.

Rovos Rail offers many extravagant train safari journeys from 2-15 days:

·        Cape Town to Pretoria – 2 days
·        Pretoria to Durban – 2 days
·        Pretoria to Victoria Falls – 3 days
·        Winter Warmer Cape Town to St James – 4 days
·        Pretoria to Namibia – 9 days
·        African Golf Collage between Pretoria, Kruger Park, Durban to Cape Town – 9-10 days
·        Golf Safari – 9 days
·        Durban to Victoria falls including Fairmont Zimbali, Fire and Ice and Victoria Falls Hotel – 11 days
·        Cape Town to Dar es Salaam – 15 days   
   
African Luxurious train safari across sub-Saharan Africa Rovos Rail
Africa Luxurious train safari Africa Rovos Rail
Rovos Rail luxury train was involved in an accident April 21, 2010 when train carriages ran away for 12 miles from Centurion Station and derailed at Pretoria. 

Three people were killed and seven were seriously injured. Rohan Vos says, “It’s wonderful to see that, despite ups and downs, Rovos Rail is doing so well and has helped preserve much of our railway history.”


From the Mountains to the Sea, Africa’s luxurious train safari across sub-Saharan Africa in a private rail tour. The Pride of Africa signature train journey is Cape Town to Dar es Salaam; its lavish and romantic meander through Africa is a once in a lifetime adventure.


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Sunday, November 27, 2016

Banana vs. Plantain, what’s the difference?

There are major differences between bananas and plantains.


There are major differences between bananas and plantains.
Bananas and Plantains 
Bananas and plantains are the "first fruit crop" as its cultivation originated during a time when hunting and gathering were still the principal means of acquiring food.

Bananas and plantains may have originated in Southeast Asia but their introduction into Africa is unclear.

Africans annually consume around 46 pounds or 21 kilograms of bananas and plantains per capita, but Ugandans consume 421 pounds or 191 kilograms per year, that is more than 1 pound .5 kilogram per day.


Banana vs. Plantain, what’s the difference?



Bananas
Bananas are cultivated in nearly all tropical regions of the world. Of particular importance to Africa is the East African Highland Banana which is a staple starchy food for 80 million people and important source of income. There are 120 East African Highland Banana varieties in Uganda alone that are not found anywhere else in the world.

Banana are grown in nearly 130 countries. Uganda is the largest producer of banana and plantain in sub-Saharan Africa followed by Rwanda, Ghana, Nigeria, and Cameroon. Ugandans use the same word for food as the name of the local banana dish matooke.

Bananas are one of the most popular fruits eaten around the world. When ripe they are usually long and curved with a soft inside and are around 80% water.

Plantains

Plantain resemble banana but are longer in length, have a thicker skin, and contain more starch less sugar and are around 65% water. They are also a major staple food in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. 

They are usually cooked and not eaten raw unless they are very ripe. Plantains are more important in the humid lowlands of West and Central Africa. One hundred or more different varieties of plantain grow deep in the African rainforests.


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Saturday, November 26, 2016

Curried Cassava Fritters Recipe

Easy recipe from Africa of Curried Cassava Fritters


Cassava Recipe

Golden brown Curried Cassava Fritters are a delicious inexpensive African recipe ready in just minutes. Cassava is very versatile root vegetable and is used the main ingredient in bread, fries, roasted veggie stews and soups, chin-chin, fritters, sweet cakes and fufu.





Curried Cassava Fritters


African Recipes by
Golden brown Curried Cassava Fritters are a delicious inexpensive African recipe ready in just minutes. 

Ingredients: 
2 Cups finely grated cassava 
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 
1/2 teaspoon onion powder 
1/2 teaspoon garlic powder 
1 teaspoon curry powder 
1/2 teaspoon salt 
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes 
1-2 cups Oil for frying 

Directions:
In a large frying pan heat vegetable oil. Wash, peel and finely grate the fresh cassava in a food processor. Add spices, mix well and form small flat fritters with the pulp mixture. Fry the fritters in hot oil until golden brown about 3 minutes on each side. Sprinkle with extra salt or curry powder before serving.



Did you know?
Cassava or Manihot esculenta Crantz is the third most important food crop in sub-Saharan Africa after rice and maize (corn). 

Young girls helping in cassava processing in Nigeria. (Photo by IITA)
Young girls helping in cassava processing in Nigeria. (Photo by IITA)


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Friday, November 25, 2016

North African Tunisia Harissa Recipe

Tunisian Harissa Chickpea Vegetarian Recipe

Tunisian Harissa Chickpea Vegetarian Recipe



Tunisia is a North African country which harissa hot pepper paste is a national condiment used on hundreds of recipes. Harissa mixed with chickpeas, tomatoes and peppers makes an easy healthy African vegetarian meal.



Tunisian Harissa Chickpea Vegetarian Recipe

North African Tunisia Harissa Recipe



Ingredients
2 cans chickpeas
1 red pepper, seeded and sliced into eight strips
1 yellow pepper, seeded and sliced into eight strips
10 cherry tomatoes, halved
2 tablespoons harissa paste
½ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 handful fresh basil leaves
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 cup water


Directions
Pour the olive oil into a large frying pan over medium heat. Add peppers to the pan for 2-3 minutes. Add tomatoes then mix in harissa. Add chickpeas and water and stir, heat 5 minutes. Remove from heat, season with salt and lemon juice. Add a handful of fresh basil. Serve with fresh bread or over rice.



Tunisian Harissa Peppers with Chickpeas Vegetarian Recipe
North African Tunisia Harissa Recipe
Did you know?
Tunisia main agriculture products are olives, olive oil, grain, tomatoes, citrus fruit, sugar beets, dates, almonds; beef, and dairy products.

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Thursday, November 24, 2016

History of Earrings

Since around 3,000 B.C., earrings have been a status, cultural and religious symbol.


Earrings first made their debut in Northern Africa as early as 3,000 B.C.
Earrings first made their debut in
Northern Africa as early as 3,000 B.C.

History of Earrings


Earrings first made their debut in Northern Africa as early as 3,000 B.C. to identify the wearer’s cultural status. 

The main materials used to create Egyptian jewelry were copper and gold worn by both men and women.

Earrings have been found in graves in Iraq, Iran, Syria and Turkey, ancient Assyria. The ancient Persian city of Persepolis, founded by Darius the Great around 518 B.C. shows elaborate wall carvings of men wearing hoop earrings. 
Ancient Persian city of Persepolis, founded by Darius the Great around 518 B.C. shows elaborate wall carvings of men wearing hoop earrings
Ancient Persian city of Persepolis, shows elaborate
wall carvings of men wearing hoop earrings

Earrings were symbols of adornment, wealth and social standing, cultural identification, and even currency throughout history.

Earrings are mentioned in the bible in the Song of Solomon verses 9-11 written in the 3rd or 4th century:
 “To me, my darling, you are like my mare among the chariots of Pharaoh.
“Your cheeks are lovely with ornaments, your neck with strings of beads.”
“We will make for you ornaments of gold with beads of silver.”

Today earrings are worn for many of the same reasons in the past, for status, decoration or cultural identity.
Earrings are a fashion statement around the world
In the Middle Ages, earrings, necklaces and other jewelry was similar to clothing when it came to representing rank and wealth. 

By the 14th century, laws controlling the amount of jewelry worn based on how much land was owned and the wearer's social status restricted the wearing of jewelry. 

Historically both women and men wear earrings. Today earrings are worn for many of the same reasons in the past, for status, decoration or cultural identity. Wearing earrings is a cross-cultural beauty tradition, a timeless fashion statement that many people would feel naked without.


Did you know?

Ötzi's the Iceman frozen mummy is the oldest example of ink Copper Age tattoos, numbering over 50, the tattoos cover Ötzi from head to toe.

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Wednesday, November 23, 2016

Flies in Africa

Flies in Africa, what is African sleeping sickness? What is the tsese fly?



East African and West African African Sleeping Sickness


African trypanosomiasis, also called African sleeping sickness, is a parasitic disease spread by the tsetse fly. Symptoms include fatigue, high fever, headaches, and muscle aches. If the disease is not treated, it can cause death.
African sleeping sickness, is a parasitic disease spread by the tsetse fly
African sleeping sickness, is a
parasitic disease spread by the tsetse fly

African sleeping sickness is caused by microscopic parasites of the species Trypanosoma brucei, which is found only in rural Africa. Currently, many cases go undiagnosed and unreported. Sleeping sickness is curable with medication, but is fatal if left untreated.

There are two types of African sleeping sickness diseases each is named for the region of Africa in which they were found historically.

East African sleeping sickness is caused by the parasite Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, which is carried by the tsetse fly. East African sleeping sickness is found in parts of Eastern and Southeastern Africa. More than 95% of cases are reported from Uganda, Tanzania, Malawi, and Zambia.

Individuals can become infected with West African sleeping sickness if they receive a bite from an infected tsetse fly, which is only found in Africa. West African sleeping sickness, also called Gambian sleeping sickness, is caused by a parasite called Trypanosoma brucei gambiense carried by the tsetse fly. In recent years, 7,000-10,000 new cases of West African trypanosomiasis have been reported to the World Health Organization annually.

West African sleeping sickness and East African sleeping sickness Life Cycle


The cycle in the fly takes approximately 3 weeks. During a blood meal on the mammalian host, an infected tsetse fly injects metacyclic trypomastigotes into skin tissue. The parasites enter the lymphatic system and pass into the bloodstream.



Inside the host, they transform into bloodstream trypomastigotes, are carried to other sites throughout the body, reach other blood fluids (e.g., lymph, spinal fluid), and continue the replication by binary fission.

The entire life cycle of African Trypanosomes is represented by extracellular stages. The tsetse fly becomes infected with bloodstream trypomastigotes when taking a blood meal on an infected mammalian host.

In the fly’s midgut, the parasites transform into procyclic trypomastigotes, multiply by binary fission, leave the midgut, and transform into epimastigotes.

The epimastigotes reach the fly’s salivary glands and continue multiplication by binary fission.


The cycle in the fly takes approximately 3 weeks. Humans are the main reservoir for Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, but this species can also be found in animals. Wild game animals are the main reservoir of Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense.

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Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Five African Proverbs About Deceit and Lies

African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies.


 Every day we face an epidemic of deception. Hardly anyone never lies, but as the African ancestors say, lying is the work of petty spirits leaving the truth behind in the dirt.


Below are 5 famous African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies.


African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies
African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies

African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies
African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies

African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies
African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies
African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies
African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies

African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies
African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies


Below are 5 famous African proverbs, quotes, and sayings about cunning, deceit, and lies.

·        When a woman goes on a secret trip, she gathers firewood and returns home.

·        The thief does not steal in an unfamiliar place.

·        It is hard to cure the madness that originates in the family.

·        Anything the hawk gives birth to will not fail to carry off chickens.

·        If the child learns the trail of the snake, he will also learn the wanderings of the snake.

African Proverbs
African Proverbs

Teach us in everyday life African proverbs inspire with ancient words of wisdom.

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Monday, November 21, 2016

Shito Ghana Pepper Sauce Recipe

Shito Ghanaian Pepper Sauce Recipe


African recipes by The African Gourmet

Shito Ghanaian pepper sauce is made with hot peppers, shrimp, fish, tomato paste and seasonings to create Ghana’s most beloved hot sauce.


Shito Ghanaian Pepper Sauce Recipe African recipes by The African Gourmet
Hot Peppers for Shito
Ingredients:
3 medium tomatoes, chopped
10 hot peppers
1 tablespoon shrimp paste
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 medium onion, chopped
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 cup olive oil

Directions:

Add all ingredients into a food processor and mix well. In a medium saucepan simmer 15 minutes on low. Add sauce to soups, stews or use as a sauce over seafood. Add all ingredients into a food processor and mix well. In a medium saucepan simmer 15 minutes on low. Add sauce to soups, stews or use as a sauce over seafood.

Shito Ghanaian Pepper Sauce Recipe African recipes by The African Gourmet
Shito Ghanaian Pepper Sauce Recipe African recipes by The African Gourmet 

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Mozambique Fiery Piri Piri Sauce

Piri Piri, pepper pepper sauce is a scorching hot African hot sauce recipe.


Mozambique African Food

Fiery Piri Piri African Hot Sauce


African Recipes by

Piri Piri, pepper pepper sauce is a scorching hot African hot sauce recipe
Piri Piri, pepper pepper sauce is a scorching hot African hot sauce recipe













Piri Piri, or pepper pepper sauce is a very hot sauce that is used on meats, seafood, vegetables, French fries and any other dish imaginable.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:
Ingredients:     
1 minced piri piri pepper or any type of hot pepper    
3/4 cup olive oil
1 tablespoon brown sugar
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flake
¼ teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground paprika
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cayenne
1 teaspoon ground habanero chili powder
   
Directions:
Combine all ingredients in a saucepan over medium-high heat and cook 5 minutes. Pour sauce into prepared heat proof jars and use on grilled and baked chicken, shrimp, French fries etc...



Hot Piri Piri sauce recipe By , November 21, 2016
  Cabbage with Piri Piri Sauce
History of Mozambique food is influenced by Portuguese colonists and Piri Piri sauce is a typical dish in African households that comes with practice to make perfect. 


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