Find your true life work in Africa.

Find your true life work in Africa. Africa is home to more unknown history than known. A map of Africa does not begin to show the vastness of people, culture, food, living and ancient history of the African continent. Established 2008 Chic African Culture is a learning tool to meet the demand for better education about the entire continent of Africa.

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Find your true life work in Africa.

A lion that is caged will hate the one that is free. - with love from your ancestors

Sunday, June 28, 2015

The Gambia Hibiscus Flower Jam Recipe

Hibiscus Flower Jam Recipe

Hibiscus Flower Jam

The Gambia Hibiscus Flower Jam Recipe

African Recipes by

Hibiscus flower jam is very popular in the African country of The Gambia. This tasty easy to make hibiscus flower tropical jam is used as a filling for cakes, pies, and cupcakes or used to spread on biscuits, toast, and crackers. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients

1 cup dried hibiscus flowers
3 cups of water
1 tablespoon lemon juice
3 cups water

Directions

Steep dried blossom in hot water for 2 hours then strain using 1 cup of hibiscus flower water. Add sugar boil until the mixture thickens, about 20 minutes. Pour into prepared jars and serve on toast, crackers or uses as a filling for cakes, pies, and cupcakes. 



The Gambia did you know



Yes, it is officially true, the The officially belongs in front of Gambia since 1964. 


Gambian Woman by gisela gerson lohman braun The Permanent Committee on Geographical Names says "A letter dated May 1964 from the Gambian prime minister's office instructed that The Gambia should be used with a capital T. One of the reasons they gave was that The Gambia could be confused with Zambia, which was a new name to the international community at the time."

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Saturday, June 27, 2015

Kikuyu Tribe Money and Wealth African Proverbs

Kikuyu Tribe Money and Wealth African Proverbs

Kikuyu Tribe of Kenya African Proverbs on Money and Wealth.




Kenyan Police force

Kenya African Proverbs in Kikuyu language and the English language



Gutiri mbura itari gitonga kiayo.

There is no rain that does not bring wealth to someone.


Utonga wa muici nduthuunaga, na ni uteeaga wake.

Unlawful riches do not prosper; they ruin even the legitimate ones.


Guthinga kurugite gutonga

Virtue is better than riches.


Muriio wa njoohi niuriukagwo, no wa indo nduriukagwo.

The drunkenness of beer passes away, but that of wealth does not.


Iroobagia ha muoni.

Vultures haunt the yard of a wealthy man.


Gukiaga na gutonga ititiganaga.

Poverty and riches do not leave each other.


Indo ni kurimithanio

Wealth comes by cultivating together.


Andu ni indo.

People are wealth.


The Kenyan Shilling is the currency of Kenya

Seek wealth, not money or status. Happiness fills your home with joy, good health, and fortune and that is real wealth.


More information about Africa and African people


Historical African Country Name
Top 20 Largest Countries in Africa
How many countries does Africa have?

The real measure of your wealth is how much you'd be worth if you lost all your money.


African Water Spirit Mami Wata
Africa and Hate Have Five Things In Common
Ghost towns and wild horses of the African Namib Desert
Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=

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Thursday, June 25, 2015

The Best of African Sports Stick Fighting Games

The Best of African Sports

Intonga Stick Fighting
The ancient African art of intonga or stick fighting has been practiced in rural South Africa for centuries and is long considered the best African sport.

African Xhosa women

Before the sports of futbol and football, there was the best of African sports the ancient African Xhosa game of intonga or stick fighting.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Just as with any other African sport there are rules to follow. In Intonga stick fighting there is a penalty for Kumhlaba Wamadoda or hitting in the “Land of Men” otherwise known as hitting below the belt.


The ancient African art of intonga or stick fighting has been practiced in rural South Africa for centuries. In the past when a Xhosa boy went to initiation school, one of the skills he would learn and practice daily was stick fighting. A young Xhosa man who carried himself well as a stick fighter won respect wherever he went. 
African art of intonga or stick fighting in action
One of the first skills five-year-old Nelson Mandela learned as a herd boy was that of stick fighting. In his autobiography Long Walk to Freedom written in 1995, Mandela says, "I learned to stick-fight which is essential knowledge to any rural African boy – and became adept at its various techniques, parrying blows, feinting in one direction and striking in another, breaking away from an opponent with quick footwork."

The sport of stick fighting is one of South Africa’s oldest games developed hundreds of years ago in the rural parts of South Africa where it served as an important rite of passage in Xhosa culture. In today’s stick fighting games, competitors are armed with two sticks and protection for the head and hands. 

People from the age of five upwards are eligible to participate in the game. When you hit the head you get six points. When you hit the neck you get four points, hitting the hip scores you five points, while a blow to the leg gains you six points. The player that can hit the other with the stick the most in this play-fighting, wins.

Before there was football, there was stick fighting. Rules of the stick fighting game:


The referee will regulate the game by using a white stick to separate the players if there are illegal throws or strikes. Two fighters take up position inside the ring. 

Each fighter carries two sticks, namely the attack and the defense stick. The referee blows a whistle to start the game and the fighters try to hit their opponent with their stick, while defending themselves with the defense stick. 

Three judges judge the match and record points scored by each combatant. They also record deductible points where there are infringements of the rules. Points are awarded according to the number of blows that hit the opponent’s body. A bout consists of three rounds of one minute each.

Penalty points are deducted for every penalty committed. The following constitutes a penalty:

• Hitting no hit areas, namely “below the belt” or kumhlaba wamadoda, meaning the land of men, and also behind the head.
• Hitting an opponent during a break.
• Hitting an opponent when they are down.
• Prodding or attacking the opponent with the defense stick.
• Poking the opponent.
• Hooking or grabbing with a stick.
• Using sharpened sticks.

A Win

The player who has scored the most points at the end of the game is the winner, unless one of the players quits before the end of the game.



Did you know?
The most popular sports in South Africa are cricket, rugby and futbol (soccer).

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Wednesday, June 24, 2015

Five Foods That Help With Outer Beauty

Five Foods That Help With Outer Beauty

A good head and a good heart are always a formidable combination. - Nelson Mandela


Suri Boy Ethiopia


Five Foods That Help With Outer Beauty


Seafood
Seafood is a highly consumed food in Africa and there is early evidence to support adequate intake of 8-12 ounces per week with a cognitive boost and mood enhancement due to the essential omega-3 fatty acids. Try adding more salmon, mackerel, sardines, and shellfish to your plate, or algal oil if you are vegan or vegetarian.


Avocado
This nutrient-packed fruit is filled with vitamin B6 and magnesium, a combo that may help with serotonin production in your brain. Adding avocado slices to omelets, salads, and even smoothies will also help you get more fiber and healthy fats in your diet.


Beans and Legumes
Chickpeas, lentils, beans, and legumes also provide antioxidants, vitamin B6, and magnesium. They are protein-rich powerhouses, so try them as a swap for red meat in sautés and stir frys.


Whole Grains
Prebiotics, meanwhile, fuel your body’s probiotics so they can survive and thrive. Find them in 100% whole grains like oats, barley, and bran, as well as various fruits, vegetables, and beans. Eating more of these foods helps serotonin receptors in your GI tract function properly and they've been linked to reducing the risk of chronic disease.


Pumpkin Seeds
An ounce of pumpkin seeds provides nearly 20% of your daily value of magnesium, plus potassium. Sprinkle these seeds and nuts, like walnuts, peanuts, pistachios, and cashews on your meals or snack on them plain for a nutrient boost.



Easy seafood recipe from the Spice Island of Zanzibar.



Zanzibar is a group of islands in the Indian Ocean off the east coast of Africa. There are hundreds of seafood recipes our favorite is an easy 20-minute Zanzibar shrimp recipe.


There are hundreds of seafood recipes; our favorite is 20-minute Zanzibar shrimp.

Easy 20-Minute Zanzibar Shrimp


Ingredients
1 pound peeled and deveined large shrimp
2 onions, finely diced
3 garlic cloves, crushed
2 hot peppers, chopped
3 tomatoes, finely diced
½ teaspoon ground turmeric
½ teaspoon ground cumin
½ teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 teaspoon salt
2 cups shrimp stock
2 cups coconut milk
2 tablespoons peanut oil


Directions
Heat a deep-sided frying pan until hot and add the oil. Add the onions, garlic, hot pepper and tomatoes and cook for about 5 minutes. Add spices to the onion tomato mixture. Add the shrimp stock and coconut milk to the pan and bring to the boil. Add shrimp to the pan and simmer for 5 minutes, until the shrimp is cooked through. Serve over rice.


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Tuesday, June 23, 2015

Seven African Countries Are On Both Sides Of The Equator

All About The African Equator Countries

African Equator Countries
There are seven African countries that are on both sides of the Equator.

Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Sao Tome and Principe, Uganda, Gabon, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Somalia are the seven African countries that are on both sides of the Equator.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




An equator is an imaginary line around the middle earth. Cities and towns located on the Earth’s equator have the fastest sunrises and sunsets and the transition from day to night takes only a few minutes.

Republic of the Congo

Mother elephant with twins in Amboseli National Park, Kenya, East Africa by Diana Robinson

About 70% of the population of the Congo lives in its capital of Brazzaville, city of Pointe-Noire, or along the railroad between the two cities. 

Republic of the Congo is located in Central Africa, bordering the South Atlantic Ocean, between Angola and Gabon. The ethnic groups are Kongo 48%, Sangha 20%, M'Bochi 12%, Teke 17%, Europeans and other 3%.



Kenya


Fruit Market in Libreville Gabon by Brian GratwickeKenya is located in Eastern Africa, bordering the Indian Ocean, between Somalia and Tanzania. Nanyuki Kenya is sort of like the main office for people pursuing the adventure of climbing the highest mountain in Kenya. 

Mount Kenya is an ancient extinct volcano and is the highest mountain in Kenya and the second-highest in Africa, after Kilimanjaro. The median age of the Kenyan people is 19 years old.




Sao Tome and Principe


In the 16th century colonized by the Portuguese becomes a post for slave trade. Sao Tome and Principe was granted independence in 1975. The islands of Sao Tome and Principe are located in Central Africa in the Gulf of Guinea, just north of the Equator, and west of Gabon.



Uganda


The median age of Ugandans is 15 years old. Uganda is a landlocked, fertile, country with many lakes and rivers. One such lake, Lake Victoria is the second largest lake in the world. Uganda is located East-Central Africa, west of Kenya, east of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.



Gabon


Gabon is located in Central Africa, bordering the Atlantic Ocean at the Equator, between Republic of the Congo and Equatorial Guinea. Gabon's small population of a little more than 1.5 million, rich natural resources, and sizeable foreign support have helped make it one of the more stable African countries.


Democratic Republic of the Congo


Democratic Republic of the Congo or DRC is located in Central Africa, northeast of Angola. Nyamuragira is Africa's most active volcano and is located in the Virunga Mountains of the DRC. Nyamuragira has erupted over 40 times in 130 years.



Somalia


Somalian grandmother and grandson by TrocaireSomalia has been under Egyptian, French, British, and Italian control in 1960 becomes independent. The median age of Somalis is around 17 years old. 

The local name for Somalia is Soomaaliya, the official name is Federal Republic of Somalia.

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Sunday, June 21, 2015

Add African Culture to Your Wrists | DIY African Fabric-Wrapped Bangles

Add African culture to your wrists and up your bracelet game with a few easy steps. Create beautiful DIY fabric-wrapped bangles while adding African culture to your accessory wardrobe. You can make African wrapped bangles for pennies, garage sales, are a great place to find bangles.

DIY African Fabric-Wrapped Bangles

DIY African Fabric-Wrapped Bangles


Supplies

·        Simple bangle bracelets
·        A variety of African prints
·        Fabric scissors
·        Fabric glue
·        An iron and ironing board

Directions


Cut a long strip of fabric that measures double the width of your bangle.

Lay the fabric down on the ironing board, fold the edges in toward the center, and iron flat. Your strip should now have a front side that is clean and a back side with an ironed seam.

Add African culture to your wrists Place the end of the strip inside the bangle, with the front side facing out, apply a drop of glue and tightly wrap the strip around the bangle, fully covering the glued end to keep the strip in place.

Continue tightly wrapping the fabric strip around the bangle until you cover the entire bracelet. Apply a bit of glue inside the bangle under the final wrap. Cut the strip just after the glued section, and hold it in place until the glue dries.

Now show off your beautiful DIY African fabric-wrapped bangles to the world!

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Saturday, June 20, 2015

African Honey Acne Treatment

Before the introduction of acne treatments, honey was used as the main ingredient for skin problem cures. For centuries throughout Africa, people use honey as a skin treatment for acne, eczema, cuts, and sores. Africa has a wealth of traditional knowledge of apitherapy, the healing properties of bee products. 


Pure acne treatment honey photo by Oxfam East Africa

Honey is a sweet thick syrup produced by honeybees. Bees deposit nectar into honeycombs and seal them with beeswax to preserve the honey. Honey is made up of a solution of sugars and minerals in water, and is twice as sweet as sugar. Honey has a fairly long shelf-life, microbial activity is restricted and the product is stable for many months.

Honey has long been used as medicine. Africa has a wealth of traditional knowledge of apitherapy, the healing properties of bee products. Honey has antibiotic properties: it is a sterile solution with a high sugar concentration that prevents the growth of microorganisms. 

It is highly acidic. It contains enzymes which produce hydrogen peroxide that kills bacteria. Honey is good for healing wounds and for skin treatment.



African Honey Acne Treatment



On clean dry skin using a cotton swab, dab high-grade honey on blemish; leave on 5 minutes then rinse skin with luke-warm water and pat dry. African Honey Acne Treatment seems to work well on most types of skin issues such as a rash, acne, eczema, or psoriasis.


Pure natural clover honey

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Friday, June 19, 2015

Love never loses its way home but is it cultural appropriation

Love never loses its way home but is it cultural appropriation
African Adinkra symbols meanings originally created by the Ashanti of Ghana. We will learn why wearing Adinkra symbols are popular and is wearing Adinkra symbols cultural appropriation.

African Adinkra symbols meanings Bi Nka Bi (harmony), Ese Ne Tekrema (interdependence), Denkyem (adaptability), Fihankra (security), Gye Nyame (importance of God)
African Adinkra symbols meanings Bi Nka Bi (harmony), Ese Ne Tekrema (interdependence), Denkyem (adaptability), Fihankra (security), Gye Nyame (importance of God)




Love Never Loses Its Way Home | The Language of African Symbols


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture


West Africa Adinkra symbols represent ideas, proverbs, expressions, attitudes and behavior depicted in simply drawn figure. Adinkra symbols are well-known visual symbols that have a hidden meaning, deciphering Adinkra symbols is the same as reading a sentence as long as you know what is the symbols true meaning. 







Odo Nnyew Fie Kwan - secret meaning is “Love never loses its way home" Odo Nnyew Fie Kwan is the symbol for the power of love.








Akoma Ntoso - secret meaning isunderstanding, agreement and unity” Akoma Ntoso is the symbol for extension of the heart.






Osram Ne Nsoromma - secret meaning is “love, faithfulness, harmony” Osram Ne Nsoromma represents the moon and the star reflecting the harmony that exists in the bonding between loved ones.







Akoma - secret meaning is “take heart” using patience, love and faithfulness.

Bi Nka Bi - secret meaning is "do not bite one another" symbol of peace and harmony. This symbol cautions against incitement and conflict. The image is based on two fish biting each other tails.






Why wearing Adinkra symbols are popular

Adinkra symbols are popular today as commercial logos and personal tattoos. These symbols have been worn in Africa to express personal theological or philosophical beliefs for centuries. For starters, why Adinkra symbols are popular today is because the look is being reimagined in a way that speaks expressly to the young, appealing to millennials and Generation Z. For now, the trend retains its relevance, firmly rooted in its time on conscience and unconscious levels.

Tattoos of Adinkra symbols are tricky, can communicate trust or chaos, make you look smart or clueless, and come across as expensive or cheap. Today, social media is the driver, the Adinkra symbols resonating with those selfie addicts who like to flash their heavily tatted trophies on Instagram, their Adinkra symbol readily identifiable.

However, status is not the only draw. Younger people are adopting Adinkra symbols to signal their allegiance to a tribe or cause. Whether we want to admit it or not, we are influenced by, how others look and treat them accordingly. Being aware of how perceptions influence reality, we should also remember that anyone can look the part, and it is time well spent to get to know the person beneath the Adinkra symbol persona.



Mother earth



Is wearing Adinkra symbols cultural appropriation?

The Atlantic 2015 article by Jenni Avins and Quartz stated "Such borrowing is how we got treasures such as New York pizza and Japanese denim—not to mention how the West got democratic discourse, mathematics, and the calendar. Yet as wave upon wave of shrill accusations of cultural appropriation make their way through the Internet outrage cycle, the rhetoric ranges from earnest indignation to patronizing disrespect.

The article goes on further by saying: In the 21st century, cultural appropriation—like globalization—isn’t just inevitable; it’s potentially positive. We have to stop guarding cultures and subcultures in efforts to preserve them. It’s naïve, paternalistic, and counterproductive. Plus, it’s just not how culture or creativity work. The exchange of ideas, styles, and traditions is one of the tenets and joys of a modern, multicultural society.

“It’s not fair to ask any culture to freeze itself in time and live as though they were a museum diorama,” says Susan Scafidi, a lawyer and the author of Who Owns Culture? Appropriation and Authenticity in American Law. Cultural appropriation can sometimes be the savior of a cultural product that has faded away.”

Engage with other cultures on more than an aesthetic level “What would America be like if we loved black people as much as we love black culture?” asks Stenberg . Cherry-picking cultural elements, whether dance moves or print designs, without engaging with their creators or the cultures that gave rise to them not only creates the potential for misappropriation; it also misses an opportunity for art to perpetuate real, world-changing progress.



"The flowers of tomorrows are in the seeds of today." – African Proverb. Love binds us all together in perfect unity.



Getting to Know Africa

Historical African Country Name
Top 20 Largest Countries in Africa
How many countries does Africa have?

Learn more about Africa.

Roots of Africanized Christianity Spiritual Songs
Chocolate Processing Facts History and Recipes
Awesome Kenyan Woman
Land is Not For Women in Sierra Leone
African Kente Cloth Facts
Accra the Ghanaian Capital Ultimate Mall Experience

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=

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Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Kenyan Proverbs on Avoiding Stupid Mistakes

Kenyan Proverbs on Avoiding Stupid Mistakes

Kenyan African proverbs on the virtues of discerning what is true and wise and avoiding stupid mistakes; being wise is different from being smart. Being wise can save you needless unhappiness and negativity in life.



Wise Maasai elder of Kenya


Kenyan Proverbs on Avoiding Stupid Mistakes


What was withheld, as a secret thought will come out through a slip of the tongue.


You do not benefit from a lie, a lier does not benefit from another lier.


The plan kills; the weapon only does the deed.


However long it may grow, the neck will never surpass the head.


A climbing plant with tendrils cannot grow on its own without the support of a tree.


One should either become a pillar or lean against one.


A distant shelter does not shield one from cold.


A wise man plans for tomorrow, a fool plans only for today.



Without patience, we cannot reach an honorable position.



Kenyan Proverbs


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Getting Your Goat

Easy Goat-Meat-Recipes Cookbook
cover art: serving dishes, cooking goat
Getting Your Goat: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking Goat Meat with Original Recipes and Classic Stories -
Paperback by
4.5 stars - 30 reviews
Price: $12.99 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Publisher: Amazon Company - July 1, 2012 Language: English ISBN-10: 1492995630

Chic African Culture Featured Articles

Find your true life work in Africa.

A bird sits on a tree it likes - African Proverb