Find your true life work in Africa.

Find your true life work in Africa. Africa is home to more unknown history than known. A map of Africa does not begin to show the vastness of people, culture, food, living and ancient history of the African continent. Established 2008 Chic African Culture is a learning tool to meet the demand for better education about the entire continent of Africa.

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Find your true life work in Africa.

A lion that is caged will hate the one that is free. - with love from your ancestors

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Tortoise and Crab African Short Story Folktale

Tortoise and Crab African Short Story Folktale

Tortoise and Crab is a true African folktale shaped by the tongues of African elders.


Tortoise and Crab is a true African short story folktale shaped by the tongues of African elders. Everyone knows that Tortoise and Crab are enemies and this short Animal African folklore explains why the hatred runs deep.



Tortoise and Crab African Folktale


Tortoise and Crab Short Story African Folktale



Everyone knows that Tortoise and Crab are enemies.

One morning on the seashore they decided to fight to see which was the stronger, but, as both of them are protected by a hard shell, neither could succeed in injuring the other.

Finally, they came to an agreement that they were equal in strength.

“We are so well protected by our armor,” said Tortoise, “that no one can harm us.”

“And thus,” said Crab, “we are the strongest creatures in the world.”

But at this moment, a boy passed by and picked them both up. 

The tortoise was boiled in a pot and his shell was made into ornaments while Crab was cooked in a stew for the boy’s supper. 

Since that day, the descendants of the two boasters have always been ashamed to meet, and that is why they always shun one another.

Have you ever read about The Wonderful Child African folktale?

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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

Favorite South Africa Recipe Bunny Chow Recipe

Vegetarian South African Bunny Chow Recipe


Favorite South African Recipe

Traditional South African fast food recipe for vegetarian bunny chow has nothing to do with nutrition for rabbits. A traditional bunny chow or bunny if you are in Durban in South Africa where the dish originated is made with mutton, chicken, beans, curry, and vegetables. Bunny is made by taking 1/2 loaf of bread hollowing it out and filling it with your choice of spices, meats, and vegetables.



Bunny Chow is made to be eaten with your hands and rarely is Bunny Chow served with a fork.



Favorite South Africa Recipe Bunny Chow Recipe


Bunny Chow is one of Durban's best Indian food recipe



Mom's Bunny Chow Recipe South Africa Bunny Chow is the South African fast food bread bowl and is a common dish
Culture and food of South Africa would not be complete without including the favorite South African food recipe Bunny Chow. In South Africa, Bunny Chow is the South African fast food bread bowl and is a common dish.


Mom's Bunny Chow Recipe My Mom's Bunny Chow Recipe 

Bunny Chow Recipe By 
South African food recipe

Favorite Durban South African Food Bunny Chow Recipe

Serves 6
South African food



Ingredients

2 whole loaves of bread cut vertically in the middle and most of the soft bread removed
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 15 ounce can red beans
Vegetarian Bunny Chow
Vegetarian Bunny Chow

1 cup vegetable stock (or water)
1 medium onion chopped
1 cup green peas
2 medium ripe tomatoes, chopped
2 large potatoes cut in cubes
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ teaspoon fennel seeds
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 bay leaf
2 teaspoons ground curry powder 
1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh ginger
1 teaspoon finely chopped garlic
3 curry leaves
Salt to taste


Directions
Add all ingredients except the bread, water, and beans and sauté for 3 minutes over medium heat. Add remaining ingredients; simmer until the potatoes are soft.  Spoon mixture into the hollowed out bowl and serve warm.


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Saturday, June 14, 2014

Understand the differences between organics

What does organic mean? How is food defined and labeled as organic by the USDA?




Understand the differences between organics. Organic products have strict production and labeling requirements. Some people believe organic means organic but this is a misconception.


Understand the differences between organics. Organic products have strict production and labeling requirements. Some people believe organic means organic but this is a misconception.


The USDA organic labeling fact sheet states


Organic products have strict production and labeling requirements. Unless noted below, organic products must meet the following requirements:
·         Produced without excluded methods (e.g., genetic engineering), ionizing radiation, or sewage sludge

·         Produced per the national list of allowed and prohibited substances

·         Overseen by a USDA national organic program- authorized certifying agent, following all USDA organic regulations.


The term 100% organic means:

Raw or processed agricultural products in the “100 percent organic” category must meet these criteria:
·         All ingredients must be certified organic.

·         Any processing aids must be organic.

·         Product labels must state the name of the certifying agent on the information panel.

The term organic means:

Raw or processed agricultural products in the “organic” category must meet these criteria:
·         All agricultural ingredients must be certified organic, except where specified on the national list.

·         Non-organic ingredients allowed per national list may be used, up to a combined total of five percent of non-organic content (excluding salt and water).

·         Product labels must state the name of the certifying agent on the information panel.

The term “Made with” organic means:

Multi-ingredient agricultural products in the “made with” category must meet these criteria:
·         At least 70 percent of the product must be certified organic ingredients (excluding salt and water).

·         Any remaining agricultural products are not required to be organically produced but must be

·         Produced without excluded methods

·         Non-agricultural products must be specifically allowed on the national list.

·         Product labels must state the name of the certifying agent on the information panel.

The term specific organic ingredients mean:

Multi-ingredient products with less than 70 percent certified organic content (excluding salt and water) don’t need to be certified.



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Saturday, June 7, 2014

African Hot Peppers List and Making Shito Pepper Sauce

African Hot Peppers List and Making Shito Pepper Sauce


List of hot peppers from Africa and how to make Shito hot pepper sauce



Hot peppers that originated from Africa, Devil's Rib from Ghana, the African Cheeky, Fatali, Pettie Belle and Piment Curry hot-peppers from Mauritius.


Hot peppers that originated from Africa

Devil's Rib
An extremely hot habanero chili from Ghana. They are slightly ribbed and turn from a shiny green to bright red as they ripen. The plants are sprawling bushes that can be grown either in the ground or large pots.


Cheeky
Sea Spring Seeds selection from the Ghanaian landrace kpakpo shito, the small, roundish fruit are about 20 mm in diameter and change from lime green to orange to red as they mature. They are very hot, and their deep lobes make them look somewhat like the cheeks of a vagabond, hence the name. The plants are a tidy bush and can grow unsupported, making them perfectly suited for small or large pots and grow bags.


Fatali
A Habanero relative, this prolific plant can grow tall. The plant produces good yields of wrinkled extremely hot fruits which turn from pale green to bright yellow when mature. They have a fruity, almost citrus-like flavor making it a very attractive hot sauce.


Pettie Belle
A habanero chili selected by Sea Spring Seeds from the kpakpo shito landrace of Ghana. A high proportion of the small fruit (about 25 mm in diameter) is bell-shaped, making this variety possibly the smallest bell pepper in the world. They are hot, but measuring around 37,500 SHUs they are still one of the milder habaneros. The medium-tall, bushy plants can be grown in the ground or larger pots, though they will need support to stay upright.


Piment Curry
Mauritius pepper that is thin-fleshed, wrinkled fruit is about the size and shape of the forefinger, turning from green to red as they ripen. Mauritians like to eat this chili green, either gently fried in oil or coated in a spicy batter made from chickpea flour and deep-fried.



What makes hot peppers hot

The capsaicin in peppers causes the heat you experience while eating hot peppers. The more capsaicin in the pepper, the hotter it is. This unique, natural chemical is found prominent in the seeds of the pepper. 

The hot pepper’s power is concentrated in the placenta, the central core of the fruit that contains the seeds, otherwise known as the pith, and the thick veins that attach the placenta to the pepper wall. 

Removing the seeds, then, usually results in removing the placenta and veins, thus cooling the fruit’s heat.

African hot peppers


Shito Ghanaian Pepper Sauce Recipe



Shito Ghanaian pepper sauce is made with hot peppers, shrimp, fish, tomato paste and seasonings to create Ghana’s most beloved hot sauce.


Ingredients

3 medium tomatoes, chopped
10 hot peppers
1 tablespoon shrimp paste
1 tablespoon fish sauce
1 medium onion, chopped
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/4 cup olive oil

How to make Shito Ghanaian pepper sauce

Add all ingredients into a food processor and mix well. In a medium saucepan simmer 15 minutes on low. Add sauce to soups, stews or use as a sauce over seafood. Add all ingredients into a food processor and mix well. In a medium saucepan simmer 15 minutes on low. Add sauce to soups, stews or use as a sauce over seafood.


Read more facts and food recipes about Africa


West African Ginger Beer Recipe

Sierra Leone Fish Soup Recipe

African Countries and Capitals That Begin with M Word Search

Quick and Easy Bitter Leaf Stew Recipe

All 54 African countries have national anthems.

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=

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Sunday, June 1, 2014

African Women Don't Plant Families Don't Eat

African Women Don't Plant Families Don't Eat


Africa women farmers

Women farmers are arable and pastoral farmers, whose daily tasks included general handiwork, tending to livestock, plowing, planting and harvesting crops. They must produce a good crop and healthy animals in order to make a living and to feed the family. The reality for most rural African women with or without men in family life, if they do not work 7 days a week rain or shine her nor her family shall eat.





Around the world, there are distinct roles given to women. Women play a critical role in farming Africa as well as in livestock raising and food processing. Almost half of the farming agricultural workers in sub-Saharan Africa are women, however; African women farms are far less productive than African males.


Agriculture has always played a fundamental role in the lives of people on the African continent. Whether the food is grown for household consumption or for sale women farmers contribute heavily to Africa’s agriculture.


Millions of female African farmers face a range of problems, including traditional attitudes of the role of women, denied access to owning land and claiming the land of a dead spouse or relative land not understanding their right under the law, access to credit and productive farm inputs like fertilizers, pesticides and farming tools and problems obtaining loans.


According to Africa's Process Panel 2013, only one in five Africans have any form of account at a formal financial institution, with the poor, rural dwellers and women facing the greatest disadvantage. Such financial exclusion undermines opportunities for reducing poverty and boosting growth. The gender gap is particularly marked in Cameroon, Mauritania, Mozambique, and Nigeria. Gender disparities reflect a mix of social, cultural and legal barriers to women’s participation in the financial system.


When farmers have access to finance – credit, savings, insurance – they can insure themselves against risks such as drought, and invest more effectively in better seeds, fertilizers, and pest control. With access to decent roads and storage, farmers can get their harvests to market before they rot in the fields. Trade barriers and inadequate infrastructure are preventing our farmers from competing effectively. "They are being told to box with their hands tied behind their backs" according to Africa's Process Panel 2013 report.

Market day in Ghana


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Getting Your Goat

Easy Goat-Meat-Recipes Cookbook
cover art: serving dishes, cooking goat
Getting Your Goat: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking Goat Meat with Original Recipes and Classic Stories -
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4.5 stars - 30 reviews
Price: $12.99 In Stock
Product details 224 pages Publisher: Amazon Company - July 1, 2012 Language: English ISBN-10: 1492995630

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A bird sits on a tree it likes - African Proverb