Find your true life work in Africa.

Find your true life work in Africa. Africa is home to more unknown history than known. A map of Africa does not begin to show the vastness of people, culture, food, living and ancient history of the African continent. Established 2008 Chic African Culture is a learning tool to meet the demand for better education about the entire continent of Africa.

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Find your true life work in Africa.

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Thursday, July 18, 2019

Civil War in South Sudan Five War African Proverbs

Civil War in South Sudan Five War African Proverbs
Why do wars occur and recur

War may sometimes be a necessary evil. But no matter how necessary, it is always an evil, never a good. We will not learn how to live together in peace by killing each other's children. – 39th President of the United States of America, James Earl "Jimmy" Carter Jr., Nobel Lecture, December 10, 2002.

When a complaint concerning a threat to peace is brought up, the first action is usually for the parties to try to reach an agreement by peaceful means. When a dispute leads to fighting, the communities first concern is to bring it to an end as soon as possible. The main strategies for preventing disputes from escalating into conflict, and for preventing the recurrence of conflict, are preventive diplomacy and preventive disarmament.

Preventive diplomacy refers to action taken to prevent disputes from arising or from escalating into conflicts, and to limit the spread of conflicts when they occur. It may take the form of mediation, conciliation or negotiation and through human rights monitoring and security sector reform, to the disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of former combatants.

The duty to prevent and halt genocide and mass atrocities lies primarily with the community, but the international community has a role that cannot be blocked by the invocation of sovereignty. Control no longer exclusively protects communities from foreign interference; it is a charge of responsibility where communities are accountable for the welfare of their people. This principle is enshrined in article 1 of the Genocide Convention and embodied in the principle of “sovereignty as responsibility” and in the concept of the Responsibility to Protect.

The conflicts of today, while fewer in number, are deeply rooted. For example, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Darfur, and South Sudan today, are in a second or third wave of conflict. And many are complicated by regional dimensions that are key to their solution. Conflicts today are also increasingly intensive, involving determined armed groups with access to sophisticated armaments and techniques.

The nature of conflict has also changed over the years with inter-State conflict, however, over time intra-State conflicts and civil wars have become the norm.

Civil War in South Sudan Five War African Proverbs



War may sometimes be a necessary evil. But no matter how necessary, it is always an evil, never a good. We will not learn how to live together in peace by killing each other's children.
War Is African Proverbs

War may sometimes be a necessary evil. But no matter how necessary, it is always an evil, never a good. We will not learn how to live together in peace by killing each other's children.
War Is African Proverbs

War may sometimes be a necessary evil. But no matter how necessary, it is always an evil, never a good. We will not learn how to live together in peace by killing each other's children.
Five War African Proverbs

War may sometimes be a necessary evil. But no matter how necessary, it is always an evil, never a good. We will not learn how to live together in peace by killing each other's children.
War Is African Proverbs

War may sometimes be a necessary evil. But no matter how necessary, it is always an evil, never a good. We will not learn how to live together in peace by killing each other's children.
War Is African Proverbs


Don’t celebrate war, cry for peace. 

Civil War in South Sudan Civilian Losses

In December 2013, following a political struggle between Kiir and Machar that led to Machar's removal as vice president, violence erupted between presidential guard soldiers from the two largest ethnic groups in South Sudan. Soldiers from the Dinka ethnic group aligned with Kiir and those from the Nuer ethnic group supported Machar. In the midst of chaos, Kiir announced that Machar had attempted a coup and violence spread quickly to Jonglei, Upper Nile, and Unity states. Rebel factions seize control of several regional towns, thousands are killed and many more flee. Uganda troops intervene on the government's side.

On April 15, 2014, Sudan People’s Liberation Army in Opposition forces attacked Bentiu town, Unity State. Ghastly massacres of civilians were committed during the attack. Two days later, an angry mob attacked the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan base in Bor town, Jonglei State, where thousands of internally displaced persons were seeking protection.

Around 353 civilians were killed, and at least 250 wounded, in the attacks on Bentiu and Bor. At least 19 civilians were killed at the Bentiu Civil Hospital and approximately 287 civilians were killed in a mosque in the Kalibalek area. The attack on the UNMISS Bor protection of civilians site resulted in at least 47 civilian deaths. Perpetrators intentionally targeted civilians, often based on ethnicity, nationality, or perceived support for the opposing party to the conflict. In both Bentiu and Bor, attacks took place against protected objects – a hospital, a mosque, and a United Nations base – which may amount to war crimes.

After over five years of civil war in South Sudan, the year 2018 brought an increase in regional and international pressure on President Salva Kiir and opposition leader and former Vice President Riek Machar to reach an agreement to end the conflict in South Sudan. Since civil war broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, over 400,000 people have been killed and nearly five million people have been internally displaced or fled to neighboring countries.

In August 2018, the Khartoum Declaration of Agreement was signed that included a cease-fire and a pledge to negotiate a power-sharing agreement to end the war. Despite sporadic violations over the ensuing weeks, this agreement was followed by a peace agreement to end the civil war signed by the government and opposition party, along with several other rebel factions. The agreement, called the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan, included a new power-sharing structure and reinstated Machar as vice president. However, continued attacks and violations mark the Khartoum Declaration of Agreement just another failed peace agreement.

In 2018, rapes in Bentiu, South Sudan were a major concern to the United Nations Mission in South Sudan who held urgent meetings with authorities and urged them to take immediate action to protect women and girls in the area and to hold the perpetrators of those terrible crimes to account. The United Nations Mission in South Sudan peacekeepers immediately sent patrols to the area to provide a protective presence and the human rights team launched an investigation to identify the perpetrators as well as clearing foliage from the sides of the road so attackers will find it harder to conceal their presence.

On December 3, 2018, a joint statement by Mark Lowcock, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Henrietta Fore, UNICEF Executive Director, and Natalia Kanem, United Nations Population Fund Executive Director stated "In the past 12 days, more than 150 women and girls have sought assistance after suffering from sexual violence, including rape, near Bentiu in South Sudan. We echo the statement of the Secretary-General’s Special Representative for South Sudan condemning these abhorrent attacks.

"The assailants have been described as armed men, many in uniform. We call on the relevant authorities to publicly denounce the attacks and ensure that those responsible for these crimes face justice. All parties to the conflict must uphold their obligations under international humanitarian law and cease attacks on civilians.

"Coming during the international campaign of 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence, the attacks remind us that a broad pattern of gender-based violence, including sexual violence, has continued in South Sudan. In the first half of 2018, some 2,300 cases of gender-based violence were reported to service providers, the vast majority perpetrated against women and girls. More than 20 percent of survivors who have come forward are children. The actual number of cases is far higher, as gender-based violence continues to be severely under-reported.

"Humanitarian workers are providing critical, life-saving assistance and services to the survivors of the attacks. We call on the authorities to ensure the protection and safety of both civilians and aid workers, to ensure that further such horrendous violations are prevented and that assistance reaches those in need."


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Friday, July 12, 2019

Cultured meat grown in laboratories and the impact on Africa

Cultured meat grown in laboratories and the impact on Africa

Explanation of cultured meat grown in laboratories and the impact on Africa


Would you eat cultured meat burgers
Would you eat cultured meat burgers


What is Cultured Meat?



Cultured meat is meat produced outside of a living animal produced by culturing animal stem cells created for humans to eat. Cultured meat is envisioned as a potential to produce a high-quality protein that could complement and or partially substitute for the growing demand for meat proteins due in-part to more than half of global population growth between now and 2050 is expected to occur in Africa and a more environmental and sustainable way to feed people is vital.

The world's first cultured meat burger colored red with beetroot juice was cooked and eaten at a news conference in London August 2013. Sergey Brin, the co-founder of Google, was the project's backer and funded$330,000 for research.

Critics of cultured meat opinion technological fixes, whether it is lab-grown meat or GM crops address the symptoms rather than the causes of world hunger. Prof Tara Garnett, head of the Food Policy Research Network at Oxford University, said decision-makers needed to look beyond technological solutions. "That's just weird and unacceptable. The solutions don't just lie with producing more food but changing the systems of supply and access and affordability, so not just more food but better food gets to the people who need it."

Garnett added: "A lot of people consider lab-grown meat repulsive at first. But if they consider what goes into producing normal meat in a slaughterhouse, I think they would also find that repulsive." She also stated, "We have a situation where 1.4 billion people in the world are overweight and obese, and at the same time one billion people worldwide go to bed hungry," she said.

Pew Research Center analysis on Africa's population growth stated that by 2100, five of the top 10 most populous countries in the world will be in Africa. Four countries currently in the top 10 – Brazil, Bangladesh, Russia, and Mexico – will fall out and be replaced by African countries projected to have sizable population growth: the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Tanzania, and Egypt. These countries will join Nigeria, which is already in the top 10 and is expected to become the third-most populous nation.


Cultured meat is also known as



Clean Meat

Kill Free Meat

Lab Grown Meat

Vitro Meat

Synthetic Meat

Grilling meat for a party
Grilling meat for a party


Cultured meat sustainable food systems?



Supporters of cultured meat believe that opponents should consider earths limited natural resources, such as land, water, fuel, and increased emissions as well as rapid population growth, food security is one of the largest challenges of the current century. Lab-grown meat, cultured from the stem cells of animals, is considered by many to be a sustainable and ethical solution to the demands of the meat industry.

Commercial scale production is anticipated by 2021 however to date cultured meat does not appear to offer substantial benefits over poultry meat or egg production due to cell and tissue culture are currently not efficient processes in terms of energy, water, and feedstock expenditure.

“Comparison with the land use savings from reduced consumer waste, including over-consumption, suggests greater benefits could be achieved from alternative dietary transformations considered. We conclude that although a diet with lower rates of animal product consumption is likely to create the greatest reduction in agricultural land, a mix of smaller changes in consumer behavior, such as replacing beef with chicken, reducing food waste and potentially introducing insects more commonly into diets, would also achieve land savings and a more sustainable food system.”

Technology still uncertain, and benefits compared to other sources of nutrients currently are not well demonstrated. The high direct energy used in production also a concern. In addition to challenges of consumer acceptance, the use of cultured meat products as food for human requires additional evaluation as to how much regulatory oversight to safeguard quality, safety, public and environmental health is necessary.

The United States is the largest producer of beef in the world
The United States is the largest producer of beef in the world


Importance of cattle and cattle meat in Africa



Gabon, South Africa, and Mauritius are the African countries that eat the most meat. The African dynamic trio of beef producers are Botswana, Namibia, and Zimbabwe. The United States is the largest producer of beef in the world while Vegetarian India is the largest exporter of buffalo meat in the world. In Botswana, as a result of an outbreak of the foot and mouth disease, the exporting of beef by the beef powerhouse country has significantly reduced exports.

Zimbabwe’s lucrative beef export into the European Union has been struggling over the past few years. Farm invasions instituted by President Robert Mugabe’s government in 2000 destroyed the sector as it displaced many beef ranchers from their land. Despite difficulties, Namibia has found a way to export its prime cattle. Under the new protocol signed with Namibia, the southern African country will be allowed to export to Hong Kong frozen deboned and bone-in meat, excluding head, feet, offal and viscera and other by-products. The top three meat-eating African countries are Gabon 146 pounds per person, South Africa -129 pounds and Mauritius 109 pounds per person. A single US resident consumes, on average, 265 pounds per year.

Cushites, or Cushitic people, live in the arid and semi-arid eastern and northeastern parts of Kenya. They reside along a very large area of land that runs from the east of Lake Turkana, stretches to the north of Kenya, and through to the Indian Ocean. Cushites include the Somali, Rendile, Borana and Oromo tribes. Due to the dryness of their habitat throughout most of the year, Cushites are mainly nomadic pastoralists who keep large herds of cattle, camels, goats, and sheep. Cushitic people maintain very close ties with their kinsmen - the Cushites of the neighboring countries of Somalia and Ethiopia.

Cattle and children are an important aspect to the Maasai people. The Maasai people of East Africa live in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania along the Great Rift Valley on semi-arid and arid lands. Maasai own large herds of cattle, sheep, and goats which they follow around seasonally in search of new grazing grounds and water sources. Traditionally Maasai tribes have been an independent tribe.

Cattle and children are an important aspect to the Maasai people. Cattle play a central role in the life of the Maasai. Cattle represent food and power; the more cattle a Maasai has, the richer he is and therefore the more power and influence he will have within his tribe. Individual, families, and clans established close ties through giving or exchange of cattle. While the Maasai traditions have undergone some changes in the past few decades, their strong social traditions remain intact.

The Samburu are semi-nomadic pastoralists. Cattle, as well as sheep, goats, and camels, are of utmost importance to the Samburu culture and way of life. Traditionally men look after the cattle and they are also responsible for the safety of the tribe. Samburu boys learn to tend cattle from a young age. The Rift Valley province in Kenya is a dry, somewhat barren land, and the Samburu have to move constantly to ensure their cattle can feed. Around every 6 weeks, the group will move to find fresh grazing grounds. These settlements are called manyattas. On November 11, 2011, 1,000 cattle and 2,000 sheep and goats of the Samburu livestock were impounded due to a violent dispute over land ownership with the Nature Conservancy and the African Wildlife Foundation who purchased the land and gave it as a gift to Kenya for a national park, Laikipia National Park.

What does cultured meat means to Africa
What does cultured meat means to Africa

What does cultured meat mean to Africa?



It is far too early to tell if cultured meat will cause a shift in the African traditional culture traditions as well as the economy. Cultured meat has the backing of a few wealthy capitalists but not the average person in Africa or around the world. Researchers are looking for alternatives to traditional meat because it is believed farming animals is helping to drive up global temperatures however if the lab-grown meat is quite energy intensive to produce then they could end up being worse for the climate than cows are.

“Growing meat in the laboratory may do more damage to the climate in the long run than meat from cattle. "The climate impacts of cultured meat production will depend on what level of sustainable energy generation can be achieved, as well as the efficiency of future culture processes," said lead author Dr. John Lynch.

For now, harvesting cells instead of animals has no bearing as many pastoral communities in Africa view cattle as a sign of wealth. Scientists growing cultured meat may believe cattle are an unsustainable food supply however cattle are an increasingly important resource to millions of Africans as sustainable sources of food, and wealth.



Source References -

Meat Science Volume 102, April 2015, Pages 49-58

FAO/WHO/AU International Food Safety Conference Summary page two

Global Food Security Volume 15, December 2017, Pages 22-32


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Thursday, July 11, 2019

30 Cheetah Animal Facts for Kids

30 Cheetah Animal Facts for Kids

In Africa, cheetahs live in Morocco, Algeria, Niger, Mali, Togo, Nigeria, Burkina Faso, Benin, South Sudan, Sudan, Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, The Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Zambia, South Africa, Namibia, Botswana, ESwatini, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique. The largest land areas cheetahs live in are the Southern African countries of Namibia and Botswana.

Their range occurs widely but is extremely sparse and fragmented in the regions they still inhabit. However, Southern and Eastern Africa are major roaming areas for cheetah populations. As human populations grow and expand throughout Africa, agriculture, roads, and settlements destroy the open grasslands that cheetahs inhabit.

The Southern African cheetah lives mainly in the lowland areas and deserts of the Kalahari, the savannahs of Okavango Delta, and the grasslands of the Transvaal region in South Africa. The Southeast African cheetah is currently the most common subspecies and was widespread everywhere in southern to central Africa, ranging from South Africa to the southern Democratic Republic of the Congo Katanga Province and southern Tanzania. Total cheetah populations in Africa are estimated around 6,670. Illegal trade is threatening wild populations of cheetahs. Live cheetahs are caught and traded illegally to the pet trade and are hunted for their skin.

During the 1970s, 9,500 cheetahs were killed on Namibian beef farming farmlands. Large areas of Namibia are covered by farmland, because of this conflict with farmers and cheetahs occur when cheetahs perceive to hunt beef livestock. Cheetahs hunt all their prey by themselves and can become easy targets. Namibia hosts the largest population of cheetahs worldwide but farmers who perceive cheetahs as a threat to their animals threaten this population.

There are five subspecies of cheetahs, four live in Africa. The Tanzanian cheetah, also known as the Kenyan cheetah or the East African cheetah Acinonyx jubatus raineyi is native to East Africa. This cheetah subspecies inhabits the savannahs and grasslands of Tanzania, Uganda, Somalia, and Kenya. The Sudan cheetah, also known as the Somali cheetah, Central African cheetah or Northeast African cheetah, Acinonyx jubatus soemmeringii lives in the savannahs, grasslands, deserts, and arid areas of Central and Northeast Africa.

The South African cheetah or the Namibian cheetah Acinonyx jubatus jubatus is the most numerous subspecies of the cheetah. The cheetah can be found in the savannahs of the Okavango Delta, grasslands of the Transvaal, farmlands of Namibia, and the arid areas of the Kalahari. The Northwest African cheetah, also known as the Saharan cheetah or the Senegal cheetah Acinonyx jubatus hecki, is native to Northwest Africa. It is one of the most threatened subspecies of the cheetah and is classified as critically endangered. All cheetahs bear distinctive tear marks particularly thicker at the corners of the mouth.



Here are 30 of the best random facts about African cheetahs. Right now, you will learn all you wanted to know about African cheetahs. Read on for some valuable cheetah facts so you are knowledgeable about African cheetahs.


Best cheetah fact ever, for more than half of every stride, the cheetah is airborne.

Cheetahs usually prey on small antelopes such as Thomson's gazelles and impalas, but they also hunt small mammals and birds.
Hungry Cheetah

30 Cheetah Animal Facts for Kids



1. The cheetah scientific name is Acinonyx jubatus.

2. The cheetah is the fastest land sprinter on earth.

3. Cheetah's purr just like a domestic cat when content.

4. Cheetahs have long, slim, muscular legs; a small, rounded head set on a long neck; a flexible spine; a deep chest; special pads on its feet for traction; and a long tail for balance.

5. Cheetahs are the only cat that cannot retract its claws.

6. The cheetah's coat is tan with about 2,000 small, round black spots, with fur that is coarse and short.

7. The cheetah has a small head with high-set eyes.

8. Black tear marks, which run from the corner of its eyes down the sides of the nose to its mouth, keep the sun out of its eyes and aid in hunting.

9. The cheetah has an enlarged liver and heart; and wide nostrils and increased lung capacity.

10. For more than half of every stride, the cheetah is airborne.


The cheetah is found in Africa throughout Benin, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.
Relaxing Cheetah


11. The cheetah is found in Africa throughout Benin, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

12. Cheetahs can be found in open plains, woodland, savannah, highlands and arid regions extending to desert fringes.

13. Females are not territorial but roam over large areas.

14. Males warn intruders to stay away from their territories by scent marking but sometimes fights occur, resulting in serious injury or death.

15. The cheetah’s social system of solitary females and social males is unique among cats.

16. Females raise cubs on their own, teaching them survival skills.

17. At around 18 months, the mother leaves the cubs, who then form a sibling group, which can stay together for up to 6 months.

18. By 2 years, the female siblings have left the group to establish their own home ranges, but male siblings often remain together for life.


Cheetah's are active in the daytime, hunting in the early morning and late afternoon.
Cheetah eating lunch


19. Coalitions of 2 to 5 brothers and sometimes-unrelated males are formed to better acquire and defend territories.

20. The cheetah uses a variety of vocalizations include chirping like a bird, stutter calling, moaning in distress and growling, snarling and hissing in anger or fright.

21. Cheetahs are active in the daytime, hunting in the early morning and late afternoon.

22. Cheetahs usually prey on small antelopes such as Thomson's gazelles and impalas, but they also hunt small mammals and birds.

23. Chases last an average of about 20 seconds, and rarely more than 1 minute.

24. Being sprinters, cheetahs hunting speeds averages 40-75 miles per hour.

25. Prey is tripped and then suffocated with a clamping bite to the underside of the neck.

26. Solitary females and males may hunt every 2 to 3 days but females with cubs need to hunt every day.

Hunting by lions and hyenas accounts for more than half of cheetah cub deaths
Cheetah Cub


27. Of all big African predators, the cheetah is second only to the wild dog in hunting success, with an average success rate of 50%.

28. The average lifespan of a cheetah is 10-12 years; only around 7,500 wild cheetahs are left in Africa.

29. Cub mortality is extremely high, they are most vulnerable from 6 weeks to 4 months and in open habitat like the Serengeti plains, less than 5% reach adulthood.

30. Hunting by lions and hyenas accounts for more than half of cheetah cub deaths.



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Tuesday, July 9, 2019

The United States and Africa Imports Trade Facts

The United States and Africa Imports Trade Facts

Stats and facts on Foreign import trade from Africa to The United States of America and top African Growth and Opportunity Act AGOA African trade suppliers.



The Assistant United States Trade Representative for African Affairs serves as the chief advisor to the U.S. Trade Representative on issues of trade and investment with Africa and also serves as coordinator and point of contact within the Administration on U.S. African Trade issues. In 2017, seven of the 20 fastest growing economies in the world were in Africa according to The International Monetary Fund (IMF), also known as the Fund.

Shopping trip to the mall with friends The United States and Africa Imports Trade Facts


Constance Hamilton is the Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Africa, Office of the United States Trade Representative. In this capacity, she leads U.S. trade efforts in the 49 countries of sub-Saharan Africa and oversees the Administration’s implementation of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA). The Africa Office oversees implementation of the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA), a trade preference program enacted in 2000 that is at the center of U.S.-African engagement on trade and investment by providing duty-free entry into the United States for almost all African products if they are AGOA eligible.

Top AGOA suppliers were Nigeria $6.1 billion; mainly crude oil, South Africa, $2.9 billion; mainly vehicles and parts, iron and steel, fruits and nuts, Angola($2.3 billion, mainly crude oil, Chad $590 million, mainly crude oil, and Kenya $408 million, mainly apparel, macadamia nuts, and cut flowers.

Other leading AGOA beneficiaries included Lesotho, Mauritius, and Madagascar importing apparel, Ethiopia importing footwear, Cote d'Ivoire importing cocoa paste and cocoa powder, and Ghana importing cocoa paste, cocoa powder, and apparel. Office of The United States Trade Representative does not list trade negotiations for imports or exports to Libya, South Sudan, and Algeria.

Note:
Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding Systems (HS)
The Harmonized System is an international nomenclature for the classification of products. It allows participating countries to classify traded goods on a common basis for customs purposes. At the international level, the Harmonized System (HS) for classifying goods is a six-digit code system.

The HS comprises approximately 5,300 articles/product descriptions that appear as headings and subheadings, arranged in 99 chapters, grouped in 21 sections. The six digits can be broken down into three parts. The first two digits (HS-2) identify the chapter the goods are classified in, e.g. 09 = Coffee, Tea, Maté and Spices. The next two digits (HS-4) identify groupings within that chapter, e.g. 09.02 = Tea, whether or not flavored. The next two digits (HS-6) are even more specific, e.g. 09.02.10 Green tea (not fermented)... Up to the HS-6 digit level, all countries classify products in the same way (a few exceptions exist where some countries apply old versions of the HS).


The United States Trade Representative for Trade Policy with Africa

The United States and Africa Imports Trade Facts 2017 - 2018 for 51 African Countries


Easy to understand trade facts


U.S.- Angola Trade Facts

• Angola was the United States' 61st largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Angola totaled $2.7 billion in 2018, up 3.6% ($95 million) from 2017, but down 85.7% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were mineral fuels ($2.5 billion), precious metal and stone (diamonds) ($198 million), special other (returns) ($5 million), railway vehicles/equipment ($391 thousand), and iron and steel products ($243 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Angola totaled $77 thousand in 2018.




U.S.- Benin Trade Facts

• Benin was the United States' 158th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Benin totaled $19 million in 2018, up 7.6% ($1 million) from 2017, but down 38.1% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: edible fruit & nuts (cocoa, Brazil, cashew) ($16 million), wood and wood products ($1 million), art and antiques ($603 thousand), furniture and bedding ($420 thousand), and woven apparel ($381 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Benin totaled $16 million in 2018. The leading category is tree nuts ($16 million).




U.S.- Burkina Faso Trade Facts

• Burkina Faso was the United States' 187th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Burkina Faso totaled $5 million in 2018, up 0.8% ($42 thousand) from 2017, and up 771.7% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: edible fruit & nuts (cocoa, Brazil, cashew) ($3 million), precious metal and stone (other articles of precious stone) ($960 thousand), special other (returns) ($503 thousand), art and antiques ($283 thousand), and knit apparel ($147 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Burkina Faso totaled $3 million in 2018.




U.S. - Burundi Trade Facts

• Burundi was the United States' 166th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Burundi totaled $14 million in 2018, up 56.2% ($5 million) from 2017, and up 392.6% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: coffee, tea & spice (coffee) ($7 million), ores, slag, and ash (tungsten) ($7 million), pharmaceuticals ($245 thousand), electrical machinery ($40 thousand), and special other (low value estimates) ($12 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Burundi totaled $7 million in 2018. The leading category is coffee, unroasted ($7 million).



U.S. - Cameroon Trade Facts

• Cameroon was the United States' 112th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Cameroon totaled $220 million in 2018, up 85.4% ($101 million) from 2017, but down 64.2% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: mineral fuels ($126 million), wood and wood products ($26 million), cocoa ($16 million), rubber ($15 million), and special other (returns) ($8 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Cameroon totaled $36 million in 2018. Leading categories include: cocoa paste & cocoa butter ($15 million), rubber & allied products ($15 million), processed fruit & vegetables ($2 million), tobacco ($1 million), and coffee, unroasted ($973 thousand).



U.S. - Cabo Verde Trade Facts

• Cabo Verde was the United States' 194th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Cabo Verde totaled $4 million in 2018, up 6.1% ($205 thousand) from 2017, and up 801.3% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: prepared meat and fish (fish and caviar) ($841 thousand), stone, plaster, cement ($487 thousand), baking-related products ($378 thousand), knit apparel ($264 thousand), and beverages (ethyl alcohol) ($257 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Cabo Verde totaled $594 thousand in 2018.



U.S. - Central African Republic Trade Facts

• The central African Republic was the United States' 200th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from the Central African Republic totaled $3 million in 2018, up 32.3% ($695 thousand) from 2017, but down 66.8% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: artificial flowers, feather or down articles ($1 million), wood and wood products ($704 thousand), art and antiques ($324 thousand), machinery ($162 thousand), and electrical machinery ($62 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from the Central African Republic totaled $4 thousand in 2018.



U.S. - Chad Trade Facts

• Chad was the United States' 88th largest supplier of goods imports in 2017.

• U.S. goods imports from Chad totaled $526 million in 2017, down 41.5% ($373 million) from 2016, and down 75.5% from 2007.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2017 were: mineral fuels ($514 million), vegetable saps and extracts (lac; gum, resin, balsams) ($10 million), special other (returns) ($972 thousand), electrical machinery ($77 thousand), and machinery ($52 thousand).



U.S. - Cote d'Ivoire Trade Facts

• Cote d'Ivoire was the United States' 76th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Cote d'Ivoire totaled $1.2 billion in 2018, up 2.5% ($30 million) from 2017, and up 14.2% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: cocoa ($734 million), mineral fuels ($372 million), rubber ($92 million), edible fruit & nuts (coconut, Brazil, cashews) ($24 million), and wood and wood products ($7 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Cote d'Ivoire totaled $851 million in 2018. Leading categories include: cocoa beans ($608 million), cocoa paste & cocoa butter ($113 million), rubber & allied products ($92 million), tree nuts ($24 million), and snack foods ($13 million).



U.S. – The Democratic Republic of Congo Trade Facts

• Congo (Kinshasa) was the United States' 147th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Congo (Kinshasa) totaled $50 million in 2018, down 42.2% ($36 million) from 2017, and down 81.4% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were copper ($20 million), precious metal and stone (diamonds) ($8 million), ores, slag, and ash (tungsten) ($6 million), art and antiques ($5 million), and coffee, tea & spice (coffee) ($4 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Congo (Kinshasa) totaled $9 million in 2018. The leading category is coffee, unroasted ($4 million).

 The Democratic Republic of Congo imported $8 million worth of diamonds into the U.S. in 2018



U.S. - Djibouti Trade Facts

• Djibouti was the United States' 148th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Djibouti totaled $48 million in 2018, up 41.1% ($14 million) from 2017, and up 585.2% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: special other (returns) ($46 million), coffee, tea & spice (coffee) ($761 thousand), special other (low value estimates) ($588 thousand), arms and ammunition ($366 thousand), and electrical machinery ($182 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Djibouti totaled $934 thousand in 2018.



U.S.- Egypt Trade Facts

• Egypt was the United States' 65th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Egypt totaled $2.5 billion in 2018, up 51.6% ($845 million) from 2017, and up 4.7% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: mineral fuels ($823 million), knit apparel ($454 million), woven apparel ($384 million), carpets and other textile coverings ($127 million), and iron and steel ($97 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Egypt totaled $133 million in 2018. Leading categories include: processed fruit & vegetables ($49 million), spices ($31 million), essential oils ($17 million), fruit & vegetable juices ($10 million), and tea, incl herb ($4 million).



U.S. - Equatorial Guinea Trade Facts

• Equatorial Guinea was the United States' 87th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Equatorial Guinea totaled $580 million in 2018, up 62.9% ($224 million) from 2017, but down 82.8% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: mineral fuels ($454 million), organic chemicals ($122 million), special other (returns) ($4 million), wood and wood products ($79 thousand), and special other (low value estimates) ($31 thousand).



U.S. - Eritrea Trade Facts

• Eritrea was the United States' 220th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Eritrea totaled $279 thousand in 2018, up 4.4% ($12 thousand) from 2017, and up 116.3% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: beverages (beer) ($94 thousand), special other (returns) ($83 thousand), vehicles ($27 thousand), special other (low value estimates) ($17 thousand), and machinery ($12 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Eritrea totaled $51 thousand in 2018.



U.S. - Eswatini Trade Facts

• Eswatini was the United States' 167th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Eswatini totaled $13 million in 2018, down 34.9% ($7 million) from 2017, and down 90.0% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: sugar ($6 million), perfumery, cosmetics ($1 million), special other (repairs) ($942 thousand), electrical machinery ($839 thousand), and machinery ($769 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Eswatini totaled $7 million in 2018. Leading categories include raw beet & cane sugar ($6 million), essential oils ($496 thousand), processed fruit & vegetables ($240 thousand), other vegetable oils ($80 thousand), and wine and beer ($11 thousand).



U.S. - Ethiopia Trade Facts

• Ethiopia was the United States' 97th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Ethiopia totaled $445 million in 2018, up 52.6% ($153 million) from 2017, and up 192.2% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: coffee, tea & spice (coffee) ($140 million), special other (returns) ($70 million), knit apparel ($61 million), woven apparel ($51 million), and footwear ($35 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Ethiopia totaled $168 million in 2018. Leading categories include coffee, unroasted ($139 million), nursery products ($5 million), spices ($3 million), planting seeds ($481 thousand), and wine and beer ($423 thousand).



U.S. - Gabon Trade Facts

• Gabon was the United States' 108th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Gabon totaled $288 million in 2018, up 45.1% ($90 million) from 2017, but down 87.3% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: mineral fuels ($182 million), ores, slag, and ash (manganese) ($85 million), wood and wood products ($7 million), rubber ($5 million), and art and antiques ($5 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Gabon totaled $5 million in 2018. The leading category is rubber & allied products ($5 million).



U.S. – The Gambia Trade Facts

• The Gambia was the United States' 217th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from The Gambia totaled $565 thousand in 2018, down 41.4% ($399 thousand) from 2017, and down 11.9% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: fish and seafood ($204 thousand), machinery ($106 thousand), animal or vegetable fats and oils ($43 thousand), low-value estimates ($41 thousand), and electrical machinery ($32 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from The Gambia totaled $71 thousand in 2018.



U.S. - Ghana Trade Facts

• Ghana was the United States' 86th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Ghana totaled $582 million in 2018, down 22.5% ($169 million) from 2017, but up 161.8% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: mineral fuels ($312 million), cocoa ($169 million), rubber ($18 million), wood and wood products ($14 million), and knit apparel ($14 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Ghana totaled $216 million in 2018. Leading categories include cocoa beans ($115 million), cocoa paste & cocoa butter ($53 million), rubber & allied products ($18 million), fresh vegetables ($11 million), and tree nuts ($5 million).



U.S. - Guinea Trade Facts

• Guinea was the United States' 183rd largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Guinea totaled $6 million in 2018, up 2.3% ($135 thousand) from 2017, but down 94% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: precious metal and stone ($2 million), special other ($987 thousand), animal or vegetable fats and oils ($764 thousand), metal tools, implements, cutlery ($720 thousand), and fish and seafood ($479 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Guinea totaled $891 thousand in 2018.



U.S. - Guinea-Bissau Trade Facts 

• Guinea-Bissau was the United States' 223rd largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Guinea-Bissau totaled $194 thousand in 2018, up 919.9% ($175 thousand) from 2017, and up 18.2% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: edible fruit & nuts ($151 thousand), special other ($20 thousand), machinery ($19 thousand), optical and medical instruments ($3 thousand), and special other ($1 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Guinea-Bissau totaled $151 thousand in 2018.



U.S.- Kenya Trade Facts

• Kenya was the United States' 85th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Kenya totaled $644 million in 2018, up 12.6% ($72 million) from 2017, and up 87.5% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: woven apparel ($240 million), knit apparel ($153 million), edible fruit & nuts (cocoa, brazil, cashew) ($74 million), special other (returns) ($55 million), and coffee, tea & spice (coffee) ($50 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Kenya totaled $154 million in 2018. Leading categories include tree nuts ($75 million), coffee, unroasted ($43 million), tea, including herb ($17 million), essential oils ($11 million), and other vegetable oils ($3 million).


Kenya imported $240 million worth of knit apparel into the U.S. in 2018


U.S.- Lesotho Trade Facts

• Lesotho was the United States' 100th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Lesotho totaled $422 million in 2018, up 36.8% ($113 million) from 2017, and up 12.7% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: knit apparel ($213 million), woven apparel ($108 million), precious metal and stone ($98 million), electrical machinery ($2 million), and special other ($391 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Lesotho totaled $109 thousand in 2018.



U.S.- Liberia Trade Facts

• Liberia was the United States' 139th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Liberia totaled $62 million in 2018, down 32.5% ($30 million) from 2017, and down 57.1% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: rubber ($56 million), precious metal and stone ($2 million), art and antiques ($2 million), animal or vegetable fats and oils ($615 thousand), and miscellaneous chemical products ($158 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Liberia totaled $57 million in 2018. Leading categories include rubber & allied products ($56 million), tropical oils ($613 thousand), spices ($24 thousand), processed fruit & vegetables ($22 thousand), and tree nuts ($6 thousand).



U.S.- Madagascar Trade Facts

• Madagascar was the United States' 81st largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Madagascar totaled $893 million in 2018, up 20.2% ($150 million) from 2017, and up 175.2% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: coffee, tea & spice (vanilla beans) ($522 million), woven apparel ($126 million), knit apparel ($73 million), other base metals (cobalt) ($65 million), and ores, slag, and ash (titanium) ($33 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Madagascar totaled $535 million in 2018. Leading categories include spices ($522 million), essential oils ($6 million), cocoa beans ($2 million), cocoa paste & cocoa butter ($402 thousand), and processed fruit & vegetables ($117 thousand).


U.S.- Malawi Trade Facts

• Malawi was the United States' 140th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Malawi totaled $57 million in 2018, down 7.8% ($5 million) from 2017, and down 12.1% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: tobacco ($25 million), coffee, tea & spice ($15 million), edible fruit & nuts ($10 million), sugar ($6 million), and knit apparel ($860 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Malawi totaled $56 million in 2018. Leading categories include tobacco ($25 million), tea, including herb ($15 million), tree nuts ($10 million), raw beet & cane sugar ($6 million), and coffee, unroasted ($746 thousand).



U.S.- Mali Trade Facts

• Mali was the United States' 189th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Mali totaled $5 million in 2018, up 63.7% ($2 million) from 2017, but down 6.8% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: art and antiques ($2 million), machinery ($1 million), electrical machinery ($474 thousand), animal or vegetable fats and oils ($371 thousand), and special other ($222 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Mali totaled $442 thousand in 2018.



U.S.- Mauritania Trade Facts

• Mauritania was the United States' 168th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Mauritania totaled $13 million in 2018, down 78.4% ($48 million) from 2017, and down 71.3% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: special other ($7 million), fertilizers ($3 million), fish and seafood ($1 million), miscellaneous manufactured goods ($789 thousand), and prepared meat and fish ($726 thousand).



U.S. - Mauritius Trade Facts

• Mauritius was the United States' 104th largest supplier of goods imports in 2017.

• U.S. goods imports from Mauritius totaled $286 million in 2017, down 14.9% ($50 million) from 2016, but up 52.4% from 2007.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2017 were: woven apparel ($123 million), precious metal and stone ($60 million), prepared meat and fish ($34 million), knit apparel ($24 million), and sugar ($11 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Mauritius totaled $12 million in 2017. Leading categories include raw beet & cane sugar ($11 million), spices ($820 thousand), sugars, sweeteners, bev bases ($85 thousand), wine and beer ($48 thousand), and tea, including herb ($10 thousand).



U.S.- Morocco Trade Facts

• Morocco was the United States' 70th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Morocco totaled $1.6 billion in 2018, up 27.0% ($333 million) from 2017, and up 78.2% from 2008. U.S. imports from Morocco are up 251% from 2005 (pre-FTA).

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: fertilizers ($775 million), electrical machinery ($126 million), woven apparel ($103 million), edible fruit & nuts (citrus, dried fruit) ($92 million), and salt, sulfur, earths, and stone (calcium ) ($66 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Morocco totaled $189 million in 2018. Leading categories include other fresh fruit ($80 million), processed fruit & vegetables ($55 million), other vegetable oils ($21 million), essential oils ($7 million), and tea, including herb ($5 million).

• U.S. imports of services from Morocco were an estimated $832 million in 2017 (latest data available), 32.3% ($203 million) more than 2016, and 194% greater than 2007 levels. Leading services imports from Morocco to the U.S. were in the travel, transport, and telecommunications, computer, and information services sectors.


Morocco imported fresh fruit worth $80 into the U.S. in 2018


U.S.- Mozambique Trade Facts

• Mozambique was the United States' 120th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Mozambique totaled $113 million in 2018, down 22.5% ($33 million) from 2017, but up 571.0% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: precious metal and stone (other stones, not strung) ($45 million), ores, slag, and ash (titanium) ($29 million), edible fruit & nuts (coconut, Brazil,cashew) ($18 million), sugar ($7 million), and fish and seafood (fresh fish, not fillet) ($4 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Mozambique totaled $27 million in 2018. Leading categories include tree nuts ($20 million), raw beet & cane sugar ($7 million), tobacco ($330 thousand), tea, including herb ($182 thousand), and red meats, fr/ch/fr ($107 thousand).



U.S.- Namibia Trade Facts

• Namibia was the United States' 119th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Namibia totaled $120 million in 2018, up 0.5% ($566 thousand) from 2017, but down 60% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: precious metal and stone ($99 million), ores, slag, and ash ($14 million), stone, plaster, cement ($1 million), special other ($860 thousand), and machinery ($657 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Namibia totaled $643 thousand in 2018.



U.S.- Niger Trade Facts

• Niger was the United States' 153rd largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Niger totaled $30 million in 2018, up 308.4% ($22 million) from 2017, but down 33.4% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: special other ($23 million), art and antiques ($3 million), machinery ($800 thousand), electrical machinery ($762 thousand), and live animals ($391 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Niger totaled $610 thousand in 2018.



U.S.- Nigeria Trade Facts

• Nigeria was the United States' 44th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Nigeria totaled $5.6 billion in 2018, down 20.3% ($1.4 billion) from 2017, and down 85.2% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: mineral fuels ($5.4 billion), special other ($45 million), fertilizers ($43 million), cocoa ($16 million), and artificial flowers, feather or down articles ($12 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Nigeria totaled $49 million in 2018. Leading categories include cocoa beans ($15 million), tea, including herb ($8 million), tree nuts ($6 million), feeds & fodders ($6 million), and spices ($4 million).



U.S.- Republic of Congo Trade Facts

• Congo (Brazzaville) was the United States' 116th largest supplier of goods imports in 2017.

• U.S. goods imports from Congo (Brazzaville) totaled $128 million in 2017, down 2.9% ($4 million) from 2016, and down 95.8% from 2007.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2017 were: mineral fuels ($103 million), wood and wood products ($14 million), machinery ($3 million), special other (returns) ($3 million), and precious metal and stone (diamonds) ($2 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Congo (Brazzaville) totaled $1 million in 2017.



U.S.- Rwanda Trade Facts

• Rwanda was the United States' 137th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Rwanda totaled $67 million in 2018, up 54.4% ($24 million) from 2017, and up 391.8% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: ores, slag, and ash (tungsten) ($31 million), coffee, tea & spice (coffee) ($28 million), knit apparel ($3 million), leather products ($1 million), and vegetable saps and extracts (pectates) ($1 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Rwanda totaled $30 million in 2018. Leading categories include coffee, unroasted ($27 million), tree nuts ($726 thousand), tea, including herb ($543 thousand), processed fruit & vegetables ($262 thousand), and roasted & instant coffee ($81 thousand).


U.S.- Sao Tome and Principe Trade Facts

• Sao Tome and Principe was the United States' 216th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Sao Tome and Principe totaled $711 thousand in 2018, down 21.9% ($199 thousand) from 2017, but up 381% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: optical and medical instruments ($368 thousand), electrical machinery ($83 thousand), machinery ($69 thousand), cocoa ($59 thousand), and low-value estimates ($29 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Sao Tome and Principe totaled $59 thousand in 2018.



U.S.- Senegal Trade Facts

• Senegal was the United States' 118th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Senegal totaled $127 million in 2018, up 75.8% ($55 million) from 2017, and up 608.9% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: artificial flowers, feather or down articles ($37 million), prepared meat and fish ($32 million), ores, slag, and ash ($30 million), fertilizers ($11 million), and special other ($6 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Senegal totaled $2 million in 2018.



U.S.- Seychelles Trade Facts

• Seychelles was the United States' 168th largest supplier of goods imports in 2017.

• U.S. goods imports from Seychelles totaled $13 million in 2017, up 125.9% ($7 million) from 2016, and up 22.3% from 2007.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2017 were: fish and seafood ($4 million), perfumery, cosmetics ($2 million), optical and medical instruments ($1 million), machinery ($1 million), and other base metals ($947 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Seychelles totaled $201 thousand in 2017.

South Africa imported wine and beer, $51 million worth into the U.S. in 2018


U.S.- Sierra Leone Trade Facts

• Sierra Leone was the United States' 141st largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Sierra Leone totaled $57 million in 2018, up 21.2% ($10 million) from 2017, and up 18.5% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: machinery ($25 million), ores, slag, and ash ($15 million), precious metal and stone ($5 million), electrical machinery ($5 million), and optical and medical instruments ($1 million).


U.S.- Somalia Trade Facts

• Somalia was the United States' 209th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Somalia totaled $1 million in 2018, up 18.4% ($182 thousand) from 2017, and up 467.5% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: perfumery, cosmetics ($647 thousand), electrical machinery ($206 thousand), vegetable saps and extracts ($198 thousand), machinery ($28 thousand), and special other ($26 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Somalia totaled $849 thousand in 2018.



U.S.- South Africa Trade Facts

• South Africa was the United States' 36th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from South Africa totaled $8.5 billion in 2018, up 9.4% ($727 million) from 2017, but down 14.9% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: precious metal and stone (platinum) ($3.8 billion), iron and steel ($752 million), vehicles ($553 million), aluminum ($480 million), and ores, slag, and ash (ash and residues) ($475 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from South Africa totaled $364 million in 2018. Leading categories include tree nuts ($80 million), other fresh fruit ($71 million), wine and beer ($51 million), processed fruit & vegetables ($43 million), and essential oils ($19 million).

• U.S. imports of services from South Africa were an estimated $2.0 billion in 2018, 6.3% ($120 million) more than 2017, and 16.1% greater than 2008 levels.



U.S.- Sudan Trade Facts

• Sudan was the United States' 163rd largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Sudan totaled $16 million in 2018.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: vegetable saps and extracts ($15 million), vegetables ($140 thousand), live animals ($120 thousand), miscellaneous grain, seeds, fruit ($68 thousand), and special other ($22 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Sudan totaled $407 thousand in 2018.



U.S. - Tanzania Trade Facts

• Tanzania was the United States' 128th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Tanzania totaled $97 million in 2018, down 21.7% ($27 million) from 2017, but up 73.7% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: knit apparel ($25 million), coffee, tea & spice ($23 million), woven apparel ($17 million), precious metal and stone ($12 million), and vegetable saps and extracts ($5 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Tanzania totaled $35 million in 2018. Leading categories include coffee, unroasted ($22 million), tree nuts ($4 million), cocoa beans ($1 million), planting seeds ($861 thousand), and tobacco ($588 thousand).



U.S.- Togo Trade Facts

• Togo was the United States' 170th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Togo totaled $13 million in 2018, down 10.8% ($2 million) from 2017, but up 17.2% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: artificial flowers, feather or down articles ($6 million), special other ($2 million), edible fruit & nuts $1 million), soap, wax, dental prep ($996 thousand), and animal or vegetable fats and oils ($576 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Togo totaled $2 million in 2018.



U.S. - Uganda Trade Facts

• Uganda was the United States' 134th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Uganda totaled $69 million in 2018, down 13.0% ($10 million) from 2017, but up 30.8% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: coffee, tea & spice ($47 million), special other ($8 million), glue & enzymes ($3 million), fish and seafood ($2 million), and live trees and plants ($2 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Uganda totaled $53 million in 2018. Leading categories include coffee, unroasted ($37 million), spices ($10 million), other dairy products ($3 million), nursery products ($2 million), and other vegetable oils ($303 thousand).



U.S. - Zambia Trade Facts

• Zambia was the United States' 115th largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Zambia totaled $183 million in 2018, up 176.7% ($117 million) from 2017, and up 255.1% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: copper ($121 million), precious metal and stone (emeralds) ($59 million), iron and steel ($1 million), special other (returns) ($1 million), and coffee, tea & spice (coffee) ($606 thousand).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Zambia totaled $906 thousand in 2018.



U.S - Zimbabwe Trade Facts

• Zimbabwe was the United States' 133rd largest supplier of goods imports in 2018.

• U.S. goods imports from Zimbabwe totaled $75 million in 2018, up 60.7% ($28 million) from 2017, but down 32.6% from 2008.

• The top import categories (2-digit HS) in 2018 were: iron and steel ($54 million), sugar ($6 million), coffee, tea & spice ($5 million), tobacco ($4 million), and nickel ($1 million).

• U.S. total imports of agricultural products from Zimbabwe totaled $16 million in 2018. Leading categories include raw beet & cane sugar ($6 million), tea, including herb ($5 million), tobacco ($4 million), nursery products ($732 thousand), and spices ($476 thousand).

The top five export markets for U.S. goods in 2017 were Canada, $282 billion, Mexico, $243 billion, China, $130 billion, Japan, $68 billion and the United Kingdom, $56 billion.


Did you Know:
The top five export markets for U.S. goods in 2017 were Canada, $282 billion, Mexico, $243 billion, China, $130 billion, Japan, $68 billion and the United Kingdom, $56 billion.

Source Office of The United States Trade Representative https://ustr.gov/countries-regions/africa/regional-economic-communities-rec



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