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Showing posts from December, 2018

Chic African Culture

The Best African Food Facts and Recipes

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The Best African Food Facts and Recipes
The Best African Food Facts and Recipes
Try an African recipe from The African Gourmet


African food recipes vary from village to village, town to town, city to city and the 54 African countries on the African continent have its own food influences. African food recipes are usually based on a carbohydrate staple such as cassava, sweet potatoes, cocoyams, yams, and plantains. It is impossible to group African food into one category.

The food of Africa is as diverse as its culture and language. African food is often highly seasoned with no less than five or six spices blended masterly into one dish. Fishing is the lifeblood of Africa. The coastline of Africa is 18,950 miles, countless lakes and rivers, Africa's largest lakes are located in the Great Lake region and are centered on and around the East African Rift.

The longest river in the world, the Nile at 4,132 miles is located in eleven countries in Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, …

Cassava Description, Toxicity, Uses, How to Prepare

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Portuguese traders introduced cassava into Africa from Brazil in the 16th century.

Currently, about half of the world production of cassava is in Africa. The plant is known under many names: ubi kettella, kaspe, manioca, rumu, yucca, mandioca, aipim, manioc, tapioca, and cassada.
Cassava is grown and cultivated in around 40 African countries, stretching through a wide belt from Madagascar in the Southeast to Senegal and to Cape Verde in the Northwest. Around 70 percent of Africa's cassava output is harvested in Nigeria, the Congo, and Tanzania.
Traditionally, cassava is produced on small-scale family farms. The roots are processed and prepared as a subsistence crop for home consumption and for sale in village markets and shipment to urban centers.

Grown throughout the tropical world, cassava is second only to the sweet potato as the most important starchy root crop of the tropics. Throughout the forest and transition zones of Africa, cassava is either a primary staple or a secondar…

Khat Amphetamine Drug Explained in Simple Words

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Khat Amphetamine Drug Explained in Simple Words
Khat is a stimulant drug derived from a shrub named Catha edulis. Khat (pronounced cot) is an evergreen shrub that grows in areas bordering the Red Sea, including countries in the horn of East Africa particularly Ethiopia. The Khat leaves are chewed by men, women, and children. Cathinone and cathine are chemicals similar to the effects of amphetamines and result in similar stimulant effects in the brain and body. Khat is the locally chewed social drug in places such as Ethiopia and has a long history as social routine dating back thousands of years.
Khat plant is widely cultivated and known by a variety of names in Yemen, the Horn of Africa, the Arabian Peninsula and many other places in and around Africa. Khat is grown in groves and three to four hours per day is devoted to striping the branches chewing the leaves releasing the drug. Other Names for Khat are Abyssinian Tea, Arabian-Tea, Chat, Jaad, Kat, Qaat and, Tohat. The khat chewer pl…

Dust Winds of Africa Blows Red Dust Health Issues

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Dust Winds of Africa Blows Red Dust Health Issues
Dust Winds of Africa Blows Red Dust and Health Issues

Harmattan winds is a season in West Africa that affects the entire worlds respiratory health. Fine particles of African
dust can penetrate more easily into the human respiratory and circulatory system than larger particles.


West Africa is well known for African dust laden Harmattan winds. The Harmattan wind is strongest from the end of November to March and is a very dry and very dusty trade wind that blows from the Atlantic Ocean across West Africa. Harmattan trade winds also steer African dust and fine sand westward across the Atlantic ocean into the Southeastern part of the USA and the Caribbean Sea.

In Texas and many other Southern US states, African dust has become a real issue in recent years. Allergy sufferers health worsens from health-related issues that come with the onslaught of the Africa red dust from the Sahara desert.

African red dust storms can cause air poll…

Super Hot Pepper Water Stew

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Super Hot Pepper Water Stew
Learn to Make West African Super Hot Pepper Water Stew

Making the super hot West African Pepper Water Chicken Stew is essential African food cooking. Pepper water stew is a fiery stew filled with meats and veggies. This is an African recipe you should always have on hand for family and friends who love flaming hot stews.


Super Hot Pepper Water Stew

Ingredients

2 pounds cut up stew chicken

1 pound cubed veal

4 cups cold water

2 large onions, sliced

1 tablespoon butter

3 hot chili peppers

1/2 teaspoon ground cloves

4 stalks celery, diced

1 tablespoon curry powder

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Juice of one lemon


Directions

Cut up the chicken and veal, add the cold water to them, and place over a slow fire. Slice the onions and brown them in the butter. Add them and the peppercorns, cloves, chopped celery, and curry powder stirred to a smooth paste with a little water to the meat.

Simmer together slowly until the chicken is tender. Remove the meat f…

Mental Illness in Africa Taboos

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Mental Illness in Africa Taboos
Mental illness and mental health are widely neglected on African health and development policies.
Article Topics.
Depression in Africa, Mental illness in African culture, Chaining the mentally ill. Africa is ripe with war, sexual violence and rape, famine, displacement, and natural and manmade disaster but the epidemic of mental illness and mental health problems are taboo subjects that leave people stigmatized in much of Africa. The epidemic of mental illness and mental health issues in Africa often come last on the list of national and local importance.



Depression is not an illness? Most developing countries dedicate less than 2 percent of governmental healthcare budgets to mental health care. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 56 percent of African countries have community-based mental health facilities, 37 percent have mental health facilities for children and 15 percent for the elderly.

Mental illness is a taboo subject t…

Listing of major African crops and agricultural products

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About Deity and African Water Spirit Mami Wata




About Africa’s top 5 most important Agricultural Products
Livestock, Maize, Cassava, Cotton and Coffee are Africa’s top 5 most important Agricultural Products

The main staple foods in the average African diet are in terms of energy cereal rice, wheat, maize, millet, sorghum 46 percent, then roots and tubers such as potatoes, cassava, yams and taro 20 percent and animal products as meat, milk, eggs, cheese and fish 7 percent.

The highest consumption of millet, oil palm, okra, sorghum, teff, wheat, yams and coffee tops the list. Staple foods are eaten regularly and in such quantities as to constitute the dominant part of the diet and supply a major proportion of energy and nutrient needs.

Of more than 50,000 edible plant species in the world, only a few hundred contribute significantly to food supplies. Wild plants are essential for many rural subsistence households; at least 100 million people are thought to use them. In Ghana, for insta…

Southern African Country Swaziland renamed eSwatini

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The Southern African Country of Swaziland no longer exists, King Mswati III renamed Swaziland eSwatini.


The monarch Mswati II announced the official change in a stadium during celebrations for the 50th anniversary of Swazi independence. He explained that the name had caused some confusion, stating,"Whenever we go abroad, people refer to us as Switzerland."


The King gave no reason for the name change except Swaziland’s new name is easier for foreigners to pronounce. How do you pronounce eSwatini well say ea-swa-tea-knee, pronounce the short e in eSwatini like the letter e in bed.

ea-swa-tea-knee
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eSwatini
eSwatini Facts

Africa’s last absolute monarch, King Mswati III, rules the nearly 1.5 million Swazi of eSwatini in South Africa.

"Land of the Swazi" people; the name "Swazi" derives from 19th century King MSWATI II, under whose rule Swazi territory was expanded and unified.

Mbabane is the capital and largest city.

At an estimated 26.9 percent, eSwatini has t…

Unclean Water Kills African People

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Unclean Water Kills African People Unclean water in Africa is a crisis. The clean water shortage in Africa kills hundreds of people a day.

Clean water shortage in Africa, water must be safe, easily reached and affordable however millions of people drink water that is not clean, accessible and inexpensive.

Safe clean drinking water in Africa is a major health crisis. The clean water shortage in Africa kills hundreds of people a day. 
For the most part, people in the USA can turn on a tap and have access to safe drinking water whenever they like, but the situation is very different in many parts of rural and urban areas of Africa. 




The people of Africa face a number of issues in attaining increased access to clean water. These include an insufficient number of skilled personnel, effective institutions, water scarcity, and pollution. The most common hindrance is the limited money and resources put towards water infrastructure. Sadly, there is not one single solution to ensuring everyone gai…