Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture

He who wants to plant corn must make peace with the crows. -African Proverb

Tuesday, April 11, 2017

History of Africa Day

Africa Day is a worldwide celebration of culture, which fosters self-respect and overall respect for Africa.



 Africa is a rich continent inhabited by poor people. Africa faces massive challenges, including extreme poverty, illness, desertification, malnutrition and ongoing conflict. Extreme poverty together with lack of access to basic education, health care and adequate nutrition continues to prevent millions of talented, promising young people in Africa from fulfilling their potential. Africa Day is a call to action for diverse people and organizations to promote the movement for Africa and her bright future.
                                                                                

History of Africa Day


Africa Day is a worldwide celebration of culture, which fosters self-respect and overall respect for Africa.
Ghana became the first African country
south of the Sahara to gain independence
After the World War II, the process of decolonization of the African continent gathered momentum as Africans increasingly advocated for political rights and independence. While in other parts of the continent colonial powers reluctantly and grudgingly relinquished power, in other parts African people launched long-drawn-out struggles against the obstinate colonial powers. Between 1945 and 1965 a significant number of African countries gained independence from European colonial powers.

Ghana became the first African country south of the Sahara to gain independence on March 6, 1957. Its independence served an inspiration to other African countries struggling against colonial rule and as a result, Ghana occupied a central role in the struggle against colonial rule. By 1958, there were only eight African countries that were independent from colonial rule. The year 1960 witnessed the independence of 17 Sub-Saharan African countries and 14 French colonies.
April 15 was enacted African Freedom Day or Africa Liberation Day, and this marked the beginning of what would later be known as Africa Day.
Women of Africa

Just over a year after its independence, Ghana under the leadership Kwame Nkrumah convened the first Conference of Independent African States on April 15, 1958. 

The conference became the first Pan African conference held on the African continent bringing together various African countries and called for the observance of African Freedom Day once a year, to mark the onward progress of the liberation movement, and to symbolize the determination of the People of Africa to free themselves from foreign domination and exploitation.

As a result, April 15 was enacted African Freedom Day or Africa Liberation Day, and this marked the beginning of what would later be known as Africa Day. 

The native code was a set of laws assigning an inferior legal status for African natives of French Colonies.
Men and children of Africa
On May 25, 1963 the Organization of African Unity (OAU), 32 independent African states signed the founding charter in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. In 2002, the OAU became the African Union.


It is important to note the Brazzaville conference began the discussion of French decolonization and approved the legal ending of the native code or the Code de l'indigénat. 

The native code was a set of laws assigning an inferior legal status for African natives of French Colonies. The 1944 Brazzaville conference started the ball rolling for the year 1960 independence of 17 Sub-Saharan African countries and 14 French colonies.

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The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb