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Old and Modern Lighthouses of Egypt and Morocco

Old and Modern Lighthouses of Egypt and Morocco

Lighthouses of Egypt and Morocco


Cap Spartel Lighthouse in Morocco
Cap Spartel Lighthouse in Morocco

Read more to discover information on the oldest lighthouse in the world, the Pharos of Alexandria in the African country of Egypt.

Point Cires is a peninsula and two islands off the northern coast of Morocco within the Strait of Gibraltar. Strait of Gibraltar is a vital shipping channel connecting the Mediterranean Sea with the Atlantic Ocean, lying between southernmost Spain and northwestern most Africa. Strait of Gibraltar is 36 miles or 58 km long and narrows to 9 miles 15 km in width between Point Cires Morocco and Point Marroquí Spain.


The islands have a lighthouse and many years ago, people decided to explore Strait of Gibraltar waters by boat. During the day, they could find their way back to the landing-place by looking for a pile of rocks that had been left there. These were the first-day marks. 

However, how could they find their way home at night? Since much of the shoreline looked very similar, groups had to light a bonfire on a high point to guide them to the right landing area. Still, later, they used a pole or a tripod to hang a metal basket containing a fire as a method of signaling.

The first lighthouses were actually given to us by nature herself. Sailors sometimes used landmarks such as glowing volcanoes to guide them. In the Ancient World, trading ships were eventually built enabling navigators to sail long distances to buy and sell goods. In the days of wooden ships with sails, the wind and waves could easily push them against the rocks and wreck them. Therefore, the need for lighthouses as warning signals arose.

Pharos of Alexandria is a lighthouse in Egypt and was the first one built about 280 B.C. Those records tell us that it was the tallest one ever built 450 ft. comparable to a 45 story skyscraper and used an open fire at the top as a source of light. The structure survived for 1,500 years until it was completely destroyed by an earthquake in the 14th Century.  At night they believe its lighted fire could be seen for thirty miles, whereas by day it produced a column of smoke for a daymark. Today people who study or are interested in lighthouses pharologists. The name comes from that famous lighthouse.

Africa and Europe are separated by less than 9 miles at the Strait of Gibraltar making lighthouses vital to keeping people, cargo and ships safe. You cannot see colors or patterns at night, but you can see the lights. The two main purposes of a lighthouse are to serve as a navigational aid and to warn boats of dangerous areas. It is like a traffic sign on the sea.

El Hank Lighthouse of Morocco
El Hank Lighthouse of Morocco

Lighthouses of Morocco

This is a list of lighthouses in Morocco, which are located along both the Mediterranean and Atlantic coastlines of this North African country.

Name of Moroccan Lighthouses
Waterbody
Year Built
Range Light can be seen in Nautical Miles (NMI)
Cap des Trois Fourches Lighthouse
Mediterranean
1909
19 nmi (35 km)
Cap Rhir Lighthouse
Atlantic
1931
22 nmi (41 km)
Cap Spartel Lighthouse
Atlantic
1864
30 nmi (56 km)
El Hank Lighthouse
Atlantic
1919
30 nmi (56 km)
Cap Malabata Lighthouse
Atlantic
Unknown
22 nmi (41 km)
Rabat Lighthouse
Atlantic
1920
16 nmi (30 km)
Sidi Bou Afi Lighthouse
Atlantic
1916
30 nmi (56 km)
Cap Sim Lighthouse
Atlantic
1917
21 nmi (39 km)


Alexandria Montazah Beach lighthouse of Egypt Abandoned Lighthouse
Alexandria Montazah Beach lighthouse of Egypt Abandoned Lighthouse

Lighthouses of Egypt

This is a list of lighthouses, beacons, headlights and towers in Egypt, which are located along both the Mediterranean and Red Sea coastlines.

Name of Egyptian Lighthouses
Waterbody
Year Built
Tower Height
Range Light can be seen in Nautical Miles (NMI)
Alexandria Montazah Beach lighthouse

Abandoned Lighthouse


Ashrafi Juzur
Red Sea
1940
26 m (85 ft)
17 nmi (31 km)
Ayn Sukhnah
Red Sea
2008
39 m (128 ft)
22 nmi (41 km)
Birket Misallat
Red Sea
Unknown
39 m (128 ft)
18 nmi (33 km)
Bluff Point
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Brothers Islands Lighthouse
Red Sea
1883
31 m (102 ft)
17 nmi (31 km)
Burullus
Mediterranean
1992
39 m (128 ft)
20 nmi (37 km)
Daedalus Reef
Red Sea
1931
30 m (98 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Dahab
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Damietta
Mediterranean
1992
39 m (128 ft)
20 nmi (37 km)
El Agami
Mediterranean
Unknown
14 m (46 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
El Arish
Mediterranean
1997
20 m (66 ft)
18 nmi (33 km)
El Bahar Tower
Mediterranean
2008
42 m (138 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
El Dikheila Range Rear
Mediterranean
Unknown
27 m (89 ft)
17 nmi (31 km)
El Ghardaqa Range Front
Red Sea
Unknown
18 m (59 ft)
18 nmi (33 km)
El Ghardaqa Range Rear
Red Sea
Unknown
15 m (49 ft)
18 nmi (33 km)
El Mallaha
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Enterprise Passage
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
False Ras Gharib
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Giftun el-Saghir
Red Sea
Unknown
25 m (82 ft)
16 nmi (30 km)
Great Pass Beacon
Mediterranean
Unknown
21 m (69 ft)
16 nmi (30 km)
Jazirat Shakir
Red Sea
1889
20 m (66 ft)
22 nmi (41 km)
Lahata
Red Sea
Unknown
39 m (128 ft)
18 nmi (33 km)
Nuweibah
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Port Said Lighthouse
Mediterranean
1869/1997
39 m (128 ft)
20 nmi (37 km)
Qad Ibn Haddan
Red Sea
1987
39 m (128 ft)
22 nmi (41 km)
Qadd el Tawila
Red Sea
Unknown
39 m (128 ft)
18 nmi (33 km)
Ras Abu Darag
Red Sea
1926
30 m (98 ft)
19 nmi (35 km)
Ras Abu Sawmah
Red Sea
Unknown
28 m (92 ft)
16 nmi (30 km)
Ras Dib
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Ras el Shaqiq
Mediterranean
1987
15 m (49 ft)
20 nmi (37 km)
Ras el-Tin
Mediterranean
1848
55 m (180 ft)
21 nmi (39 km)
Ras Gharib
Red Sea
1987
39 m (128 ft)
22 nmi (41 km)
Ras Muhaggara
Red Sea
Unknown
39 m (128 ft)
18 nmi (33 km)
Ras Muhammad
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Ras Ruahmi
Red Sea
Unknown
24 m (79 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Ras Shukier
Red Sea
Unknown
17 m (56 ft)
22 nmi (41 km)
Ras Umm Sidd
Red Sea
1987
17 m (56 ft)
22 nmi (41 km)
Ras Zafarana
Red Sea
1862
25 m (82 ft)
17 nmi (31 km)
Ras Zeit
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Raschid
Mediterranean
1991
15 m (49 ft)
20 nmi (37 km)
Siyal Island
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Umm El-Kiman
Red Sea
Unknown
10 m (33 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)
Umm Qamar
Red Sea
Unknown
12 m (39 ft)
15 nmi (28 km)



Did you know with a coastline measuring 2,500 kilometers or 1,600 miles South Africa has over 40 lighthouses.

Cape Agulhas Lighthouse, South Africa
Cape Agulhas Lighthouse, South Africa



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