Skip to main content

African Pink Rice Island

African Pink Rice Island
Madagascar Pink Rice
Madagascar Pink Rice is produced near Madagascar’s large inland lake, Lake Alaotra.

History of Madagascar Pink Rice is extensive on the African island of Madagascar.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Rice forms the staple of most meals in Madagascar however, Madagascar rice economy is very fragile due to too much rain or not enough rain.

African Pink Rice Island


Madagascar’s economy is very fragile; the country imports significant amounts of rice from international markets for everyday consumption, around 51 percent.
Planting rice in Madagascar 

What is Madagascar pink rice?


All rice starts as a whole grain, which means that the germ and bran layer is intact. When these are removed, you have white rice. The most common bran layer for rice is brown. However, there are also red and black grains of rice. Some kinds of rice are partially milled, so some of the bran layers are left on. These grains of rice tend to be light tan, pink or even a striated color. Lotus Foods Madagascar Pink Rice is rice that is partially milled retaining 66% of its bran layer retaining a high level of nutrition, but cooks faster and has a texture that is closer to white rice.



Since the year 2007, the US rice-importing company Lotus Foods has been working with the Coopérative Koloharena Ivolamiarina Besarety, Amparafaravolato market special pink rice, called Varini Dista, named after the farmer who popularized the rice. The Koloharena Ivolamiarina is part of the Confederation Nationale Sahavanona Koloharena, established in 1999, as the national office for 29 Koloharena farmer cooperatives including 950 village-based associations are committed to increasing small-farm income using environmentally sound farming methods. The cooperatives are concentrated along the threatened, humid forest in eastern Madagascar.


The rice production technologies used in Madagascar are still largely traditional, rice production is still largely highly labor intensive. Rice cultivation is found in almost every climate in Madagascar. Lowland rice production structures are well developed and rice terraces are regularly found along the roads between the capital and largest city in Madagascar Antananarivo and the third largest city in Madagascar Antsirabe.

Madagascar’s economy is very fragile; the country imports significant amounts of rice from international markets for everyday consumption, around 51 percent. Madagascar rice growers know that rice production is all about water and timing. The rice grain needs a lot of water at first, but if torrential rains fall at harvest time, they can destroy the crop. 


Rice is a hugely important part of life on the island nation off the southeastern coast of Africa. At times, it shows up for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. In much of the country, it dominates the landscape, planted in small plots across millions of acres of land.
  


The average household income in Madagascar is less than $1.25 making Madagascar an extremely low-income African country according to the World Bank Standards. 
As prices increase for rice as well as other major staples of cassava and maize, most small farmers benefit little or not at all from price increases. Other major agricultural products in Madagascar are coffee, vanilla, sugarcane, cloves, cocoa, manioc, tapioca, beans, bananas, peanuts, and livestock products.


How to cook Madagascar pink rice


Combine 1 ¾ cups of water, 1 cup rice and a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil over high heat. Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat. Let stand covered for a few minutes. Fluff and serve. A rice cooker may be used with the same water-to-rice ratio.


Did you know?
Madagascar was one of the last major landmasses on earth to be colonized by humans. Madagascar’s population consists of 18 main ethnic groups, all of whom speak the same Malagasy language. Most Malagasy are multi-ethnic, however, reflecting the island’s diversity of settlers and historical contacts.

Getting to Know Africa

Historical African Country Name
Top 20 Largest Countries in Africa
How many countries does Africa have?

Learn more about Africa.

Roots of Africanized Christianity Spiritual Songs
Chocolate Processing Facts History and Recipes
Awesome Kenyan Woman
Land is Not For Women in Sierra Leone
African Kente Cloth Facts
Accra the Ghanaian Capital Ultimate Mall Experience

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=



Wise words from the ancestors

The tongue breaks bones though it has none.

Popular posts from this blog

Nature Holds Many Secrets | Hurricanes, Angry African Ancestors

Eastern coasts of Caribbean, United States, and South America, are in danger of being blasted by hurricanes wind and rain during hurricane season from June through November. But, why?  

The scientific reason why is because of Africa’s Sahara desert dust storms and the transition of thunderstorms off the west coast of Africa. The waters in the North Atlantic Ocean are typically at their warmest while the Sahara is at its hottest from July through October, so the chances of a hurricane are highest during these months.
Hurricanes are gigantic weather systems using convection, the movement of hot and cold air, to create dangerous storms. They are rotating heat engines powered by the warmth of tropical waters having three main parts, the eye, the eyewall, and rainbands. 

Hurricanes cannot form just anywhere in the world due to the need for hot and humid air. They normally form close to the equator and move west or northwest. Hurricane Alley is a stretch of warm water through the Atlantic Ocea…

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa

Charging Cell Phones Rural Africa

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa

The simple task of charging a cell phone is no simple matter in rural African villages far from an electric grid.
With the advent of tiny rooftop solar panels electricity could be accessible to millions.
African governments are struggling to meet to electric needs of the poorest of the poor living in rural areas. 

Living off-grid may be a lifestyle choice to some and a fact of everyday living to the poorest of the poor. However, tiny rooftop solar panels and high-efficiency LED lights across the African continent could provide enough electricity to charge cell phones. 

Cell phones are vital for people in rural areas with no access to banks in order to send and receive money, access medical care and stay in contact with family and friends.
What does Off-Grid Mean? Off the grid (off-grid) means creating your own self-sufficient environment and being able to operate completely independently of all trad…

Survival of the Fattest, obese Europeans starving Africa

Survival of the Fattest

Rich get richer Survival of the Fattest, obese Europeans starving Africa
Survival of the Fattest is a sculpture of a small starving African man, carrying Lady Justice, a huge obese European woman who is a symbol of the rich world. Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture
5-12-2016

Survival of the Fattest Meaning
The copper statue Survival of the Fattest by Jens Galschiøt and Lars Calmar was created in 2002. The fat woman is holding a pair of scales as a symbol of justice however; she is closing her eyes so the justice. Galschiot symbolized the woman as being blind, refusing to see the obvious injustice.
For the rich people of the world the main issue in life is that of overeating while people in the third world are dying every day from hunger. 
The misery of imbalanced wealth distribution is creating floods of refugees. However the rich only want to preserve their privileges and take measures so harsh against the poor, they betray their morals …