Africa: African Culture (African food news culture) Folktales

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If you like honey, fear not the bees. -African Proverb

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Brief History of Lesotho Seven Military Coups Since 1991

Lesotho political crisis of Military coups in History

Lesotho military coups
Since 1991, the African kingdom of Lesotho has been in political crisis with standing seven military coups.
Since 1991, the African kingdom of Lesotho has been in political crisis with standing seven military coups.

Lesotho seven military coups 1991-2017


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Military coups in Lesotho History.



January 15, 1986, General Justin Lekhanya, the Head of the Lesotho Army, ousted Lesotho Prime Minister Chief Leabua Jonathan in a military coup. Jonathan had been prime minister since 1966 and gained executive political control over Lesotho when the king's power was limited in 1970. Sixty members of the African National Congress (ANC) were deported from Lesotho to Zambia after the coup.

February 1990, a power struggle had developed between Lekhanya and King Moshoeshoe II and the king was forced to go into exile in the United Kingdom.

In April 1991, Lekhanya was removed from power in a military coup led by Colonel Elias Tutsoane Ramaema. Ramaema announced a schedule for Lesotho's return to democracy. All political parties were soon allowed to operate in the country and Moshoeshoe returned from exile in July 1992, though not as monarch, but as a tribal chief. Democracy was restored in 1993.

Lesotho soldier
Lesotho soldiers 
After weeks of unrest caused by allegations of fraud during general elections in May 1998, violent protests and a military mutiny following a contentious election prompted South African soldiers to operate on a shoot-to-kill policy to suppress continuing violent protests. South African President Nelson Mandela publicly endorsed the military intervention in Lesotho, saying it had been essential to end "chaos and anarchy".

In 2012, competitive elections involving 18 parties saw Prime Minister Motsoahae Thomas Thabane form a coalition government that ousted the 14-year incumbent, Pakalitha Mosisili.

An attempted military coup took place September 2013, Prime Minister Thomas Thabane said in an interview "In my political life, it was not the first time that I saw this kind of activity by the Lesotho army," Thabane said. A lot of effort has been made to reform the military and to "make it a normal army that is subject to the civilian authority." The Prime Minister said that since the Lesotho military was looking for him, he decided "to get out of the way," and fled to an unknown location.

Mosisili returned to power in February 2015 after the collapse of Thabane’s coalition government and an alleged attempted military coup.

On September 5, 2017, the head of Lesotho's army, Lt Gen Khoantle Motso-Motso, and two other senior officers were killed in a shootout at a barracks in the capital, Maseru when soldiers who were fired by Motso-Motso attempted to forcefully enter his office.
On September 5, 2017, the head of Lesotho's army, Lt Gen Khoantle Motso-Motso was killed
Lt Gen Khoantle Motso-Motso
These were the words of Deputy Prime Minister, Mr. Monyane Moleleki when describing the death of Commander, Lieutenant General Khoantle Motso-Motso,“Lesotho's flag has fallen as its bearer hits the ground with his knees, succumbing to his death, a betrayal by those closest to him, and the nation coming before God with bowed heads and heavy hearts.”

Mr. Moleleki said he wished for Motso-Motso death to be Lesotho's peace sacrifice but admitted that it looks like the Commander's death was planned well ahead of time, calling for all to accept that what is done is done. The Late Lieutenant General, Motso-Motso will be buried on Thursday at Ha Lesaoana in the Butha-Buthe district.


Did you know?
Military coup or coup d'├ętat in French is when a group of people seize power in a country.

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Monday, September 25, 2017

Lies the Maiden Told African Folktale

Lies and Damn Lies the Maiden Told African Folktale

True friends never lie
If a friend can't trust you, if someone doesn't trust you, that means they are truly untrustworthy.
Women fish sellers in Fayoum, Egypt

Lies the Maiden Told African Folktale

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



What's it like to be friends with someone you know you can't trust?



Five maidens one day took their baskets and went to the river to fish. One of their numbers caught many fishes, while the other four caught none at all. And they said to their more fortunate friend: "Let us have a few of your fishes; you have so many, and we have none at all."

"No!" said she, "what I have caught I keep for myself.

And they all started for home.

They had gone quite a distance when the maiden who had caught the many fishes discovered, that she had lost her arm-ring charm.

And she asked her companions to go along back with her and help her find it.
"No!" said they. "Ask your fishes to go along with you. You know that we are your friends, yet you would not let us have a few fishes when we asked you!"

So the maiden went alone to the river.

There she met a Python. On seeing him, she became charmed by him and was unable to move from the spot. And the Python killed and devoured her.

Thus, this selfish maiden because of her lies not only lost all of her fishes, but her life as well.


The Maiden showed true selfishness being concerned only for herself regardless of her friends and she paid for her deceit with her life.


Five African Proverbs About Deceit and Selfishness













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Sunday, September 24, 2017

Apartheid Mass Murders And The White Apathy Effect

Apartheid Mass Murders And The White Apathy Effect

Queenstown South Africa, Apartheid killer rampage
Black South Africans were not allowed to live but only to work in the all white South African town of Queenstown and if you were lucky, you would not be murdered by a serial killer hired by the town to protect white life and white property.


Apartheid Mass Murders And The White Apathy Effect

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



Apartheid; blacks do not want equality, they want to be on top and that is unacceptable.



Queenstown is a town in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The town lies in an upper valley of the Great Kei River. It has a distinctive hexagonal shape, designed by its founder, Sir George Cathcart, as a precaution against attack. Queenstown was founded in 1853 intended to be a military outpost designed to protect the British subjects from attack during the time of the Frontier wars. The town was laid out around a central hexagon, which was to be the lager to which the citizens would flee in time of trouble.
 
Ezibeleni is the largest township in the Queenstown area. Its original name was Queensdale, named after Queenstown. Ezibeleni was a town established near Queenstown in the 1960s, the majority of the Black population was moved east to the township of Ezibeleni, as part of the removal of Africans to Bantustans, or homelands.
 
Ezibeleni was officially recognized in 1974, when as a part of Apartheid, black South Africans were not allowed to live, but only to work, in the white-dominated Queenstown. In order to pursue the policy of separate development, the apartheid-era government of the time dictated that, due to its location on the map and the predominant Xhosa ethnicity of its people, Ezibeleni would belong to Transkei, one of ten fragmented Bantustans, or homelands, scattered across South Africa. It was incorporated into Queenstown after 1984.

Queenstown resident Louis van Schoor is an Apartheid killer cop and hired to protect white-owned businesses in the 1980s, he is thought to have shot 101 people, killing 39, in a three-year killing spree of black Africans. It is believed some were burglars; others were passers-by dragged in from the street. All were black or colored, the term for those of mixed race.
 
The bench is empty but this young black woman in a Johannesburg railway station would be breaking the law if she sat on it.
South Africa 1982

Van Schoor’s Apartheid killer rampage was made possible by a white establishment that remained silent as his black victims piled up, many of them impoverished children such as Liefie Peters, 13, gunned down while hiding in the toilet. In 2004, van Schoor was released on parole after serving 12 years of his 20-year sentence in the East London, South African prison.

Apartheid in South Africa caused the lives of millions of black Africans to turn upside down inside out and they were subjected to unspeakable hardships. White Africans privileged by their white skins could lead comfortable lives by ignoring what was happening around them. The layer of unawareness was most noticeable in rural Afrikaans towns.

Van Schoor said, "I was doing my job - I was paid to protect property. Van Schoor was convicted of seven murders and two attempted murders. Upon his release in 2004, Van Schoor said he had found God and, when prompted, expressed sorrow to his victims' relatives. "I never apologized for what I did. I apologized for any hurt or pain that I caused through my actions during the course of my work."
On October 15, 2002, Van Schoor 23-year-old daughter, Sabrina Van Schoor began her own 25 year prison sentence for hiring a hitman Feza Mdutshane, to murder her mother, Beverly.

Until October 29, 2004, when her father was released from prison, they were serving time together in the coed Fort Glamorgan prison in East London South Africa. South Africa's worst mass murderer of black Africans Louis van Schoor, after his release attempted to gain custody his only grandchild, a mixed race baby conceived by Sabrina and a colored man.

The assassination attempts had twice failed on her mother until Van Schoor herself had stepped in and taken the assassin in her car to the home she shared with her mother. She had let him in, fetched her baby girl from her mother's bedroom and directed the assassin to "do his dirty business".

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The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

A tree without roots cannot survive the wind

A tree without roots cannot survive the wind
African Proverb