Curiosity is the key to knowledge.

African facts are endless. A map of Africa does not begin to show the vastness of people, culture, food, living and ancient history of the African continent. Established 2008 Chic African Culture is an African learning tool to meet the demand for better education about Africa.

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Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Living on Jackass African Penguin Island

Living on Jackass African Penguin Island

African penguin facts about coastal penguin residents living on Namibia and South Africa shorelines.



African Penguin Love

African Penguins grow to be about 2 feet or .67 meters tall and weighing between 4 and 11 pounds or .28 to .78 stone living and breeding on the Southern coast of Africa.


Surviving and breeding on African Jackass Penguin Island


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



African penguins breed from Hollams Bird Island Namibia to Bird Island Algoa Bay in South Africa. Gansbaai South Africa Dyer Island is a protected bird sanctuary home to large colonies of endangered African Penguins. African Penguins are the only penguin species that breed in Africa



Why are African Penguins called Jackass?

The African penguin, or black-footed penguin, is also nicknamed the jackass penguin because it’s mating call sounds like a whinnying donkey. They spend their days at sea feeding and their nights gathered together on shore. Like all penguins, African penguins are much more agile in water than on land swimming up to 12 miles per hour. Each penguin eats about one pound of fish per day feeding on small fish such as sardines and anchovies, crustaceans and squid. Each penguin eats about one pound of fish per day.


African Penguins are faithful to their mate

African Penguins are the only penguin species that breed in Africa and it is found nowhere else in the world. African Penguins are monogamous and the same pair will normally return to the same colony and often the same nest site each year on Dyer Island to be together.


Endangered Status of African Penguin

African penguins are currently classified as endangered under the International Union for Conservation of Nature, IUCN red data list criteria. Unfortunately the African Penguin is now endangered and on its way the extinction because of pollution, climate change and overfishing on African shores . The African penguin population has declined by 90 percent since the turn of the 20th century.

African penguin population has declined by 90 percent since the turn of the 20th century.


Did you know?
African Penguin population was estimated at 179,000 in 1998 and is still declining despite conservation efforts. African Penguins are the only penguin species that breed in Africa.

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Monday, January 14, 2019

Kola nut customs, benefits, uses and side effects

Teach everything you know


Kola nut customs, benefits, uses and side effects

The kola nut is the caffeine rich ovoid fruit of the kola tree relatively large being about 1 1/2 inches to 3 inches. Here are 16 facts you need to know about kola nut customs, benefits, uses and side effects.




Article Topics
Indigenous medicine, West African customs, Kola nut uses


Kola nuts come from the evergreen kola tree

Kola nut customs, benefits, uses and side effects

16 Kola Nut Facts

1.     Kola nut is a type of nut mostly found in tropical zones in the forests throughout West and Central Africa. It is found in Benin, Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Cote d'Ivoire, Gabon, Ghana, Liberia, Nigeria, Senegal, and Sierra Leone.



2.     Kola nuts come from the evergreen kola tree traditionally these nuts were used as medicine and nowadays the nuts of the tree is still used to treat many ailments.



3.     The kola nut is culturally very important for West and Central tribes in traditional ceremonies, special events and welcoming visitors.



4.     Kola nuts value as medication for weight loss, a sore throat, upset stomach, ulcers, colds, and liver disorders is priceless medicinally and spiritually to West and Central African people.



5.     Kola nut contains caffeine. Caffeine works by stimulating the central nervous system, heart, and muscles.



6.     Due to its caffeine content, large amounts of kola nuts may cause a headache, anxiety, agitation, ringing in the ears, and irregular heartbeats. The fatal dose is estimated to be about 10-14 grams; that is 150-200 mg of caffeine per kilogram of body weight.



7.     Chewing on the seeds of the bitter kola nut is rumored to have the same effect as “a little blue pill” treating sexual dysfunction. In 2014, there were fake reports kola nut cured infectious diseases such as HIV-AIDS and the Ebola virus.



8.     In central Nigeria, it was reported Ebola was cured after warm water mixed with salt and then eating bitter kola nuts.



9.     Demand for Kola nut is great in Nigeria and the ability to store the nuts and use them fresh or dried makes this an ideally versatile product to generate income for the family.



10. Kola nut is a cherished and revered ancient nut plant with real major health benefits to West and Central African people.



11. Kola nut energizer drink is very popular in Serra Leone and is used as a substitute for hops in brewing beer in some African countries.



12. Kola nut is especially useful in preventing beer spoilage.



13. In foods and beverages, kola nut is used as a flavoring ingredient.



14. Kola nut is also known as a food that has the ability to ward off evil spirits.



15. Bitter kola is not to be confused with the caffeine-rich larger sized kola nut.



16.   Deforestation and the conversion of forests for development and plantations have reduced the number of wild kola nut trees.

Kola nut is a cherished and revered ancient nut plant with real major health benefits to West and Central African people.

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Sunday, January 13, 2019

How to Cook With Banana Leaves

How to Cook With Banana Leaves

How to Cook With Banana Leaves




Article Topics
Banana Leaf, Favor Banana Leaves, Cut Banana Leaves, Banana Leaf Uses, Banana Leaf Recipe

Banana leaves are used for cooking, wrapping, and food serving in a wide range of cuisines in tropical and subtropical Africa.


How to Cook With Banana Leaves

Banana leaves are used for cooking, wrapping and food serving in a wide range of cuisines in tropical and subtropical Africa.
Steaming banana leaves

Banana leaves impart an aroma to food that is cooked in or served on them; steaming with banana leaves imparts a subtle sweet flavor and aroma to the dish. 

The leaves are not themselves eaten and are discarded after the food is eaten. Besides adding flavor, banana leaves are perfect for cooking cook fish, vegetables, rice or just about anything.

Banana leaves are used for baking wrapped food in the same way you would use tin foil or parchment paper. It is important to know banana leaf packets should be placed in a baking dish so the juices don't drip to the bottom of your oven.

How to Cut Banana Leaves


Use scissors to cut banana leaves into the size you need, depending on your recipe. For wrapping and baking food items, you will need a large leaf. Place enough for one serving in the center of the leaf, and then fold like a handkerchief to make a square packet and tie with string or a long strip of banana leaf.

Banana Leaf Recipe


Banana leaves are used for baking wrapped food in the same way you would use tin foil or parchment paper.
Selling banana coconut rice packets

Banana Coconut Rice Recipe

Ingredients:
2 cups rice
4 ripe bananas, peeled, halved lengthways, then crossways
½ cup coconut milk
½ teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon ground cloves
½ teaspoon salt
¼ cup white sugar
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
4 large banana leaves, cut into 20 cm x 30 cm rectangles

Directions:
In a saucepan add rice, stir in the coconut milk, spices and sugar. Bring to a simmer and cook for 4-6 minutes, or until the coconut milk has been absorbed and the rice is thick and sticky. Cool for 5-10 minutes.


Soften the banana leaves by microwaving for a few minutes. Place one heaping tablespoon of cooled rice in the center of the leaf. Next, add a single piece of banana, followed by another tablespoon of rice on top of the banana, fold the sides of the leaves over and tie. Repeat with the remaining banana leaves, rice, and banana. Half-fill a large steamer or saucepan with water and bring to a rapid boil over high heat. Place the finished banana leaves in the steamer basket, and set it over the pan of water. Steam for 30 minutes.  Cool serve warm and enjoy.

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