Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

When you go in search of honey, you must expect to be stung by bees

Risk and Reward



Life is worth living with the right balance between reward and risk. It is true there is no reward without taking some type of risk. When you go in search of honey, you must expect to be stung by bees is a valuable quote to take heart in your personal life, business and spiritual existence. 


When you go in search of honey, you must expect to be stung by bees -Joseph Joubert
 

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Sunday, February 7, 2016

Six Black African Heroes in History

What is a hero? A hero is a person who is admired for their courage, successes, and honorable ideals and talents. The list of African heroes is long however, Kwame Nkrumah, Patrice Lumumba, Wangari Maathai, Steve Biko, Nelson Mandela and Jomo Kenyatta are six black African heroes from Africa's history who have changed the course of Africa.


Kwame Nkrumah, Patrice Lumumba, Wangari Maathai, Steve Biko, Nelson Mandela and Jomo Kenyatta are six black African heroes from Africa's history who have changed the course of Africa.


Kwame Nkrumah

In Africa, Ghana was the first to achieve independence in 1957.The new nation's most influential figure was its prime minister, later president, Kwame Nkrumah. Ghana's route to independence became the model for the rest of the continent. "We face neither East nor West: we face forward." -Kwame Nkrumah


Patrice Lumumba 

Patrice Émery Lumumba was a Congolese independence leader and the first democratically elected leader of the Congo (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo) calling for national unity and overall African independence. “Third World is a state of the mind and until we change our attitude as Africans, if there is a fourth, fifth and even sixth world, we will be in it.” -Patrice Lumumba


Dr. Wangari Maathai

Dr. Wangari Maathai was a Kenyan environmental activist who founded the Green Belt Movement. She became the first African women to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in 2004 and the first woman in East and Central Africa to earn a doctorate degree. "I kept stumbling and falling and stumbling and falling as I searched for the good.’Why?' I asked myself. Now I believe that I was on the right path all along, particularly with the Green Belt Movement, but then others told me that I should not have a career, that I should not raise my voice, that women are supposed to have a master. That I needed to be someone else. Finally, I was able to see that if I had a contribution I wanted to make, I must do it, despite what others said. That I was OK the way I was. That it was all right to be strong." -Dr. Wangari Maathai



Steve Biko

Steve Biko was one of South Africa's most significant political activists and a leading founder of South Africa's Black Consciousness Movement. His death in police detention in 1977 led to his being hailed as a martyr of the anti-Apartheid struggle. "The basic tenet of black consciousness is that the black man must reject all value systems that seek to make him a foreigner in the country of his birth and reduce his basic human dignity." -Steve Biko


Nelson Mandela

Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was a South African political activist, Nobel Peace Prize winner and in 1994, he became the first President of South Africa to be elected in fully representative democratic elections. In 2009, the United Nations declared July 18 as Nelson Mandela Day to honor Nelson Mandela’s lifelong dedication to helping the human race throughout South Africa and by extension the world. "I hate race discrimination most intensely and in all its manifestations. I have fought it all during my life; I fight it now, and will do so until the end of my days." -Nelson Mandela


Jomo Kenyatta

On December 12, 1963, Kenya became the 34th African state to gain independence. Jomo Kenyatta was a Kenyan statesman and the dominant figure in the development of African nationalism in East Africa. His long career in public life made him the undisputed leader of the African people of Kenya in their struggle for independence. "God said this is our land, land in which we flourish as people... we want our cattle to get fat on our land so that our children grow up in prosperity; and we do not want the fat removed to feed others." -Jomo Kenyatta

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Saturday, February 6, 2016

Spicy Peanut Chicken Favorite African Recipe

Africa's food is as diverse as its geography and language. Spicy peanut chicken served with garlic mealie-meal is a favorite Southern African recipe. Mealie-meal is made from maize (corn) and is known as mealie throughout Southern Africa.



Arachis hypogaea or Groundnuts (peanuts) originated in South America and are grown throughout tropical warm temperate regions of Africa. Groundnuts are a popular addition to meals since many rural households grow groundnuts for an important source of protein. 

Groundnuts are 45-55 percent fat and the oil has high levels of energy, fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K and essential fatty acids. The outer covering of the groundnut, the pod may be consumed as a vegetable if the pods are very young. Young groundnut leaves are also used as cooked green vegetables in many African recipes.


Spicy Peanut Chicken with Garlic Mealie Meal

Ingredients:
Spicy peanut chicken served with garlic mealie-meal is a favorite Southern African recipe.

Spicy Peanut Chicken

 by Bordecia34
2 split chicken breasts
2 tablespoons smooth or chunky peanut butter
2 medium diced tomatoes
1 medium onion chopped
3 cups water or chicken broth
1 hot pepper diced
1 teaspoon oil

Directions:
Heat the oil in the large frying pan, add onions and cook until slightly soft. In a large mixing container mix peanut butter and water thoroughly and add to frying pan along with hot pepper, chicken and tomatoes. Simmer 30 minutes or until chicken is very tender. Serve with Mealie Meal on the side.

Garlic Mealie Meal

Mealie-meal is made from maize (corn) and is known as mealies throughout Southern Africa.

Garlic Mealie Meal

by look West
Ingredients:
1 cups mealie meal (white or yellow course cornmeal)
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon minced
1 teaspoon salt or to taste
3 cups water or broth

Directions:

Add water in a large pot, add garlic and salt. In a large bowl mix meal and flour together well and add to water. On high heat bring mixture to a boil stirring constantly until a thick paste forms. Remove from pot and allow to cool slightly before serving. Mealie meal is eaten by out pulling small pieces and squeezing it lightly to form dough to scoop to pick up chicken and sauce. Use mealie meal in place of your fork and spoon.

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