Africa: African Culture (African food news culture) Folktales

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture

If you like honey, fear not the bees. -African Proverb

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

The Truth About Africa's Urban Populations​

Africa's urban populations​ are booming

Six Biggest Cities In Africa

Africa's urban populations​ are booming, six of the 10 countries with the highest urbanization rates in the world in 2013 are in Sub-Saharan Africa.


Six Biggest Cities In Africa
Country City Population
Nigeria Lagos 21 million
Egypt Cairo 20.4 million
Democratic Republic of Congo Kinshasa 13.3 million
Angola Luanda 6.5 million
Kenya Nairobi 3.5 million
Somalia Mogadishu 2.1 million

Africa's urban populations​ are booming


By


Sub-Saharan Africa is urbanizing, but at lower levels of per capita GDP than other regions.

Urban areas in Africa comprise 472 million people. That number will double over the next 25 years as more people are pushed to cities from the countryside. The largest cities grow as fast as 4% a year.Since the 1980s, much of the growth in developing countries has depended on the expansion of exports through industrial production and higher technology.

Nigeria itself has the 9th largest urban population in the world, surpassing 80 million in 2013. It also ranks as the country with the most urban dwellers in all of Africa.Urban living is also linked to higher school completion rates and improved water and sanitation facilities.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, about 80% of the urban population has access to an improved water source, compared with 53% of the rural population. And access to improved sanitation facilities in urban areas is almost twice that in rural areas.

Many Sub-Saharan African cities share three characteristics that constrain economic development and growth. Two appear directly in the cities’ physical structures and spatial form:

They are crowded with people and dwellings, and they are disconnected by a lack of transport and other infrastructure.

Finally, and in Part because they are disconnected, cities are also costly. Indeed, they are among the costliest in the world, both for firms and for households.

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Monday, September 18, 2017

What You Should Have Asked Your Teachers About African Economics


About Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)


ECOWAS
Established on May 28, 1975, learn all about the Economic Community of West African States, ECOWAS, History, 15 Members, and Core Policies.


Economic Community of West African States founded in 1975 Headquartered in Abuja, Nigeria

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




About the ECOWAS


History

Established on May 28, 1975 via the treaty of Lagos, ECOWAS is a 15-member regional group with a mandate of promoting economic integration in all fields of activity of the constituting countries. The treaty of Lagos was originally touted as an economic initiative, but emerging political events led to its revision and therewith the expansion of scope and powers in 1993.

The region’s cultural, linguistic and ecological diversity presents both opportunities and challenges for the integration process. The longing to combine forces politically and economically has always been recognised as a step forward in the desire to engender co-prosperity in the area.

ECOWAS was set up to foster the ideal of collective self-sufficiency for its member states. As a trading union, it is also meant to create a single, large trading bloc through economic cooperation.


Members

Member countries making up ECOWAS are Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Cote d’ Ivoire, The Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Senegal and Togo.

Economic Community of West African States
Economic Community of West African States
In 1976, Cape Verde, one of the two Lusophone countries in the region joined ECOWAS, and in December 2000, Mauritania, which was one of the founding members decided to withdraw in December 2000.

The ECOWAS is made up of fifteen member countries that are located in the Western African region. The Atlantic Ocean forms the western as well as the southern borders of the West African region. The northern border is the Sahara Desert, with the Ranishanu Bend generally considered the northernmost part of the region. The eastern border lies between the Benue Trough, and a line running from Mount Cameroon to Lake Chad.


Core Policies

ECOWAS core policy sectors are Energy, Civil Society, Infrastructure, Information and Communication Technology, Trade, Water, Agriculture, Environment, Health and Social Affairs.

The initial drive to create ECOWAS in 1975 was economic integration; four stages were envisaged for the process of regional integration, i.e. the creation of a Free Trade Area, a Customs union, a Common Market and, finally, an Economic Monetary Union.

In recent years ECOWAS has spent considerable political energy and budgetary resources to the first strategic priority, i.e. peace and security and democratic governance, following the various crises that erupted in Côte d'Ivoire, Mali and Burkina Faso. ECOWAS also serves as a peacekeeping force in the region, with member states occasionally sending joint military forces to intervene in the bloc's member countries at times of political instability and unrest.

According to a 2016 ECOWAS Study by Jean Bossuyt, the overall progress in the actual implementation of ECOWAS policies in core areas such as trade, economic and monetary cooperation, energy and social development has been limited.

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Sunday, September 17, 2017

Legend of Deepest Darkest Africa

24 hour Legend of Darkest Africa Folklore Story

24 hours of Darkness
There were regions across the African continent when the night lasted for more than 24 hours.

Legend of Deepest Darkest Africa Folklore Story

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



What is it like to live in a place with 24 hours of darkness? The African Folktale 24 hours of Darkness teaches us what great deeds small creatures can do.


Darkest Africa Folklore Story

As the elders say, a long time ago the sun did not shine, so it was always night. In the forest there stood a tree which far exceeded in height any other; and so it was that so long as this tree stood there could be no day.

Therefore, all the beasts of the forest conspired to pull it down. The elephant, confident in his strength, first tried; but tried in vain. After him the lion, leopard, and many other animals worked hard, but none could pull it down or root it up.

At last, when all the others had despaired, the hedgehog, came forward and told them that he was stronger than they all were, and would soon prove it by felling the tree.

 So, off he ran, but soon returned with a small but sharp axe, with which he cut away until the tree fell, and as it fell the sun was seen for the first time.

Did you know?

There are two meanings to the term 'The Dark Continent'. When maps were drawn of Africa, there were huge chunks of land known as Terra Incognita, regions that have not been mapped or documented by non-indigenous Africans and as a result the term 'Dark Continent' has two meanings. The first, that it was a continent that non-indigenous Africans knew nothing of and second meaning, refers to the skin color of Africa's indigenous peoples.

Deepest Darkest Africa as it relates to Terra incognita supports the continuing European idea of supremacy over Africa and that Europeans come from a superior culture to bring light literally and figuratively to the dark continent of Africa geography and her peoples.


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Did you know?

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

A tree without roots cannot survive the wind

A tree without roots cannot survive the wind
African Proverb