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Friday, February 10, 2012

Water Scarcity | Fresh Water Problems in Africa

Deadly Water Scarcity, Fresh Water Problems in Africa
Deadly Water Scarcity, Fresh Water Problems in Africa

By Chic African Culture Press Writer

Rwanda, Africa
Friday February 10 2012 7:44 ET





Africa Water Issues

In Africa more than 25 percent of the population spends more than half an hour per round trip to collect water and sadly people living in the slums of Africa pay 5 to 10 times more for water than those living in higher income areas.
Drinking fresh water in Africa



Half of humanity now lives in cities, and within two decades, nearly 60 percent of the world's people will be urban dwellers. Two main challenges related to water are affecting the sustainability of human urban settlements: the lack of access to safe water and sanitation.

About 65 percent of Africa is arid or semi-arid and more than 300 of the 800 million people in Africa below the Sahara desert live in a water-scarce environment.




South Sudan girls collecting water

South Sudan girls collecting water

Plastic bottles are reused in South Sudan for practically all purposes

Water Africa


Barry Aliman, 24 years old, rides her bicycle with her baby to collect water for her family

Barry Aliman, 24 years old, rides her bicycle with her baby to collect water for her family

Sorobouly village near Boromo, Burkina Faso.

Water Africa


A girl collects water from a stand pipe in Costa del Sol near Maputo, Mozambique

A girl collects water from a stand pipe in Costa del Sol near Maputo, Mozambique

World Bank’s Water and Sanitation Program

Water Africa




Did you know?
In rural Africa millions of people share their domestic water sources with animals or rely on unprotected wells that are breeding grounds for pathogens.

The average distance that women in Africa and Asia walk to collect water is 3.7 miles or 6 kilometres.

Average water use ranges from 200-300 litres a person a day in most countries in Europe to less than 10 litres in countries such as Mozambique.

People lacking access to improved water in developing countries consume far less, partly because they have to carry it over long distances and water is heavy.

For the 884 million people or so people in the world who live more than 1/2 mile or 1 kilometre from a water source, water use is often less than 5 litres a day of unsafe water.

The basic requirement for a lactating women engaged in even moderate physical activity is 7.5 litres a day.

At any one time, close to half of all people in developing countries are suffering from health problems caused by poor water and sanitation.

Together, unclean water and poor sanitation are the world's second biggest killer of children.

It has been calculated that 443 million school days are lost each year to water-related illness.

Many schools have no water supply and almost half have no sanitation facilities. Of those schools with sanitation, only half had separate facilities for boys and girls. The result was that girls chose not to utilize these facilities, either because they did not want to risk being seen to use the toilet, or because they were warned that these facilities were not private or clean enough. Girls also avoided drinking water at school to avoid urination, thereby becoming dehydrated.


Woman collects water in Costa del Sol near Maputo, Mozambique

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