Chic African Culture Africa Factbook

Warzone blockades shut off food supplies

There are over 1.2 billion people living in Africa, 44.5 million Africans live with daily threats of terrorism and war.

War zone blockades shut off the import of food supplies. The land is real, its there but it is not obtainable to feed families during war. War zone blockades shut off the import of food supplies by cutting off transportation by land and sea. 

There are over 1.2 billion people living in Africa; 44.5 million live with daily threats of terrorism and war. According to the last stats as of June 2019, there are fifteen African countries involved in war or are experiencing post-war conflict and tension.

Africa has 54 countries, 27 percent of people on the African continent are directly affected by tribal conflict, wars and involved with perpetual terrorist violence. Africa's farming economy of imported manufactured goods and local industry is neither large nor well developed enough to meet demand to feed families during times of war and conflict.

In Africa small families grow 70 percent of their food supply.
In Africa small families grow 70 percent of their food supply.

War creates a lack of rich farming land.

The cycle of poverty, malnutrition, starvation, and famine for female farmers in war and conflict zones in Africa is all to common amid fewer resources. Poverty, a lack of rich farming land, conflict, war and worsening access to basic services such as health and education are some of the drivers of malnutrition and starvation in many African countries.

Around 90 percent of the world’s 570 million farms are worked and owned by small families farming on 10 acres or less. Most are small and are found in the rural areas. In Africa, there are an estimated 33 million farms owned and operated by small families who grow 70 percent of their food supply.

Conflict is the single biggest driver of hunger today.
Conflict is the single biggest driver of hunger today.

Conflict and War Creates Hunger

Starvation is an extreme, potentially fatal form of acute malnutrition that weakens the immune system, leaving the body susceptible to infectious diseases such as cholera, malaria, pneumonia and measles. 

Malnutrition, even in its less extreme form, has long-term effects such as impaired physical and cognitive development, reduced educational attainment and labor productivity, and an increased risk of disease and death.

Famine is declared when malnutrition is widespread, and when people have started dying of starvation through lack of access to sufficient, nutritious food. War and inequality are critical factors of hunger putting affordable food beyond the reach of millions. 

The small east African country of Burundi is one of the poorest in the world.
The small east African country of Burundi is one of the poorest in the world.


Famine is declared in an area when at least 20 percent of households face extreme food shortages, at least 30 percent of children suffer from acute malnutrition, and the daily death rate from starvation, or a combination of malnutrition and disease, exceeds 2 people per 10,000.

Gender inequalities reflect a mix of social, cultural and legal barriers to women’s participation in the farming financial system. Whether the food is grown for household consumption or for sale, women farmers contribute heavily to Africa’s agriculture and the reduction of malnutrition, starvation and famine.

The small east African country of Burundi is one of the poorest in the world. It also has one of the highest rates of malnutrition, with 52 percent of children aged under age five classed as chronically malnourished.

Millions of female African farmers face a range of problems, including traditional attitudes of the role of women, denied access to owning land and claiming the land of a dead spouse or relative land not understanding their right under the law, access to credit and productive farm inputs like fertilizers, pesticides and farming tools and problems obtaining loans.

Female agriculturists have a primary role in the economic and food lives of people on the African continent. Female farmers need special protection against shady land purchases, social, cultural and legal barriers.

It's hard to get harvests to market before they rot in the fields in conflict zones.
It's hard to get harvests to market before they rot in the fields in conflict zones.


The gender gap due to war and conflict is particularly marked in Cameroon, Mauritania, Mozambique, and Nigeria. Smallholder farmers, and agriculture productivity at the center of national food security and nutrition strategies, with a focus on women farmers. 

Conflict is the single biggest driver of hunger today. Conflict in Nigeria’s Northeast region has displaced over 2 million people and left another 8.7 million food insecure in Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe states.

One in five Africans has any form of account at a formal financial institution, with the poor, rural dwellers and women facing the greatest disadvantage. Such financial exclusion undermines opportunities for reducing poverty and boosting growth.

With access to decent roads and storage, women farmers can get their harvests to market before they rot in the fields. Trade barriers and inadequate infrastructure are preventing women farmers from competing effectively. 


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