Chic African Culture Africa Factbook

Resettling Free Blacks in Nigeria: Martin Delaney's Plan for Black Independence

Martin Delaney's Africa for Africans independence plan was to resettle Free Blacks from America to Nigeria.

Martin Delaney’s Africa for Africans plan for resettlement of Free Blacks from America to Nigeria was an important example of self-determination and the quest for freedom and independence. Delaney believed that Free and Freed Blacks could learn a great deal from Nigerian culture and history, and that they could draw upon these resources to establish a vibrant and successful community. 

Resettling Free Blacks in Nigeria: Martin Delaney's Plan for Black Independence

Martin Delaney's Africa for Africans plan to resettle Free Blacks from America to Nigeria.

Martin Delaney's plan for resettlement of Free Blacks from America to Nigeria was important. Delaney believed that Free and Freed Black peoples could leverage Nigeria's location to establish a thriving trade network that would connect them with other countries in Africa and beyond. He began to develop the idea in the 1860s and worked on it for several years, promoting it throughout the United States and attempting to raise funds to support the project. 

The Free Blacks from America to Nigeria self-determination and resettlement plan was a freedom project Martin Delaney labored on throughout his life. Martin Delaney's interest in resettling Free and Freed Black peoples in Africa dates back to the 1850s. At that time, he became involved in the American Colonization Society, a group that sought to resettle free blacks in Liberia and Sierra Leone. 

But, Delaney did not support the American Colonization Society's efforts to resettle free blacks in Liberia and Sierra Leone therefore he chose to carve a new path to Nigeria for three major reasons; current resettlement plans did not empower Black people but was an extension of the slave trade, Sierra Leone and Liberia in his eyes were not an authentic African culture but a colony ruled by European powers and finally the climate and well established traditions and the culture and history of Nigeria was more suitable to free blacks in the United States. 

Nigeria was more suitable to free blacks in the United States

He believed that the colonization society's approach was patronizing and did not empower African Americans to create their own independent communities. He saw the society's efforts as an extension of the slave trade, as it sought to remove free blacks from the United States and resettle them in Africa without giving them a voice over their own lives.

Delaney saw Liberia and Sierra Leone as countries that had been founded by American and European settlers, rather than by Africans themselves. He felt that these countries did not represent an authentic African culture and that they had been tainted by the legacy of colonialism and slavery. 

Also he believed that the tropical climate and terrain of West Africa would be better suited to African Americans than the more inhospitable climate of Liberia and Sierra Leone. He saw Nigeria, in particular, as a promising destination for resettlement, as it had a large and diverse population, a strong agricultural base, and a rich cultural history that he believed could provide a foundation for a new Free Black community. 

Therefore Delaney began developing his own plan for resettling Free and Freed Black peoples in Nigeria. He believed that by creating a new community in Nigeria, Free Blacks could establish a new and independent lived for themselves, free from the overt violence, oppression and racism faced in the United States. 

He envisioned that the new Nigerian resettlement community would include farmers, artisans, and skilled workers, who would be able to build a new life for themselves and their families in Nigeria. In the 1860s, Delaney began to develop his plan for resettling Free and Freed Black people in Nigeria. 

Delaney and his numerous anti-slavery and abolitionist volunteers traveled extensively throughout the United States to promote the Nigerian resettlement plan and encourage African Americans to sign up. They organized rallies, speeches, and meetings, and worked to build support for the idea of emigrating to Nigeria.

Resettling Free Blacks in Nigeria. Black Independence

Three major challenges Delaney faced in his plan for resettling Free and Freed Black people in Nigeria; transportation, cost and organizational difficulties.

One of the biggest challenges that Delaney faced was how to transport a significant number of Free and Freed Blacks from the United States to Nigeria. At the time, there were limited transportation options available, and it was difficult to find a reliable and affordable way to transport large numbers of people across the ocean. Another concern for Delaney were about the health and safety of the passengers, as well as the logistics of feeding and caring for them during the journey. 

Another major obstacle that Delaney faced was the cost of the resettlement plan. Building a new community in Nigeria would require significant resources, including funds to purchase land, build homes and infrastructure, and establish agricultural operations. Delaney attempted to raise money for the project by soliciting donations from wealthy Free and Freed Blacks and white philanthropists, but he struggled to raise enough funds to make the plan a reality. 

Delaney also faced challenges in organizing the resettlement effort. He had to coordinate the efforts of a large number of people, including those who would be emigrating to Nigeria, those who would be left behind in the United States, and those who would be involved in establishing the new community in Nigeria. There were also logistical challenges involved in procuring supplies, hiring workers, and ensuring that the community would be sustainable over the long

Who was Martin Delaney.

Martin Delaney was born into slavery, his true birth name is not clear, but it is believed that he was born around 1812 in Charles Town, Virginia to his mother and father who were both slaves. 

Delaney's owner was tobacco plantation owner named Patrick Delaney, who was a slaveholder in Virginia. Delaney earned his freedom through self-purchase and after earning his freedom, Martin Delaney became active in the abolitionist movement and worked to help other enslaved individuals escape from the slavers bondage. 

He also served as a recruiter for the Union Army during the American Civil War, helping to recruit African American soldiers to fight for their freedom and the end of slavery. In 1861, the American Civil War broke out, which disrupted Delaney's plans to resettle African Americans in Nigeria. 

Mr. Martin Robison Delany

Many of the settlers who had already relocated to Nigeria chose to return to the United States to fight in the war for the Union. Delaney believed that Free and Freed Blacks could learn a great deal from Nigerian culture and history, and that they could draw upon these resources to establish a vibrant and successful community. 

Martin Delaney's plan to resettle Free and Freed Blacks in Nigeria was an important endeavor, even if it did not succeed. It represented a vision for a better future and inspired others to continue the fight for African and Black American liberation and equality. It also provided valuable lessons for future generations about the challenges and opportunities of building a successful and sustainable community. 

Martin Robison Delany was born on May 6, 1812, and he died on January 24, 1885. He was an important figure in the abolitionist movement in the United States, and he also played a significant role in the history of Pan-Africanism.

Delany worked as a journalist, physician's assistant, and military officer, and he was also a prolific writer, publishing several books on race relations and black nationalism. He is often credited with popularizing the Pan-African slogan Africa for Africans, which advocated for the unification and liberation of African peoples.

Delany authored several books and essays throughout his lifetime. The Condition, Elevation, Emigration, and Destiny of the Colored People of the United States published in 1852, is a treatise on the status of African Americans in the United States and argues for their emigration to Africa as a means of escaping racial oppression. The Huts of America publishefd in 1861, this novel depicts an unsuccessful slave revolt and explores themes of black nationalism and self-determination. The Negro in Politics published in 1869 discusses the role of African Americans in politics during the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. The book explores the challenges faced by African Americans as they sought to participate in the political process and gain equal rights and representation.

Comments

Wise African Proverb

Wise African Proverb

More Articles to Read from Chic African Culture

Show more

Week’s Best Posts and Pages

How to Cure Meat

Chura Dance Twerking on the Beach in Africa

He is a good father who at the table serves his children first

Hibiscus Flower Bloom Tea Recipe