Chic African Culture Africa Factbook

France's Utilization of Maps to Exploit Algeria

The French government's exploitation of Algeria through the use of the Delamarche map. Maps were created to justify French colonial rule in Algeria.

The French colonization of Africa began with the invasion and annexation of Algeria by the French government in 1830. The French saw Algeria as a strategic location due to its proximity to France and the Mediterranean Sea, and its natural resources, including wheat, minerals, agriculture, and oil.

In 1840 the French government invaded and annexed Algeria to exploit resources.

Maps were created then used to justify French colonial rule in Algeria by falsely claiming large portions of Algeria were uninhabited.

The French used surveying techniques similar to those used in the Great Trigonometric Survey of India to map and define their territories in Algeria, which helped in the exploitation of its resources and development of infrastructure. 

The survey, known as the Triangulation of Algeria, was completed in 1860 and produced highly accurate and detailed maps known as the Carte topographique de l'Algérie. 

These maps provided essential information for the French government to manage the colony, exploit its natural resources, and develop its economy. The Carte topographique de l'Algérie served as a model for other colonial powers in mapping and defining their territories in Africa and other parts of the world. 

In 1840 the French government invaded and annexed Algeria to exploit resources.

The French colonization of Africa began in 1830, this was before the Scramble for Africa 1884-1885. The French government beginning in 1830 invaded and annexed Algeria.

The French used surveying techniques similar to those used in the Great Trigonometric Survey of India to map and define their territories in Algeria by using The Triangulation of Algeria Survey to exploit the territory's natural resources, including minerals, agriculture, and oil.

Before the French, Algeria was ruled by the Ottoman Empire. France saw Algeria as a strategic location due to its proximity to France and the Mediterranean Sea. Algeria was a source of wheat, which was essential for the French economy, and it was also seen as a potential market for French goods.

The Ottoman Empire was a state founded by Turkish tribes in the late 13th century, which grew to become a powerful empire. At its height, the Ottoman Empire controlled large parts of southeastern Europe, western Asia, and northern Africa, and it was one of the most significant political and military powers in the world.

In 1827, France began to establish a military presence in Algeria, and over the next few decades, it gradually expanded its control over the territory through a series of military campaigns. In 1830, France invaded Algeria and captured the city of Algiers, which became the capital of the new French colony.

The French government justified its colonization of Algeria in terms of civilizing the indigenous population and bringing modernization and development to the region. 

However, the colonization of Algeria was for economic and strategic motivations, as France sought to secure its position in the Mediterranean and to exploit the territory's natural resources, including minerals, agriculture, and oil.

France’s Continued Oppression of Algeria Using the Triangulation of Algeria Survey.

The French government conducted a survey of Algeria, which was then a French colony, in the 1830s and continued until the 1860s. The survey, known as the Triangulation of Algeria, used trigonometric calculations to map the country's terrain and establish its boundaries. The survey was led by French mathematician and geographer Charles-Eugène.

The accurate maps produced by these surveys were essential for colonial administrators to manage their territories, and they also played a key role in the exploitation of natural resources and the development of infrastructure in these regions.

The French government conducted a survey of Algeria

Triangulation involves measuring the angles between prominent landmarks across the country, such as mountains and coastlines, and using trigonometric calculations to determine their distances from each other.

The survey was completed in 1860, and its results were published in a series of maps and documents known as the Carte topographique de l'Algérie. The maps produced by the survey were highly accurate and detailed, and they provided the French government with essential information for managing the colony, and exploiting its natural resources.

The Triangulation of Algeria is considered a significant achievement in the history of cartography and surveying, and it served as a model for other colonial powers who sought to map and define their territories in Africa and other parts of the world.

The Delamarche Map Explained.

The Delamarche map is also known as The Carte topographique de l'Algérie and the Topographic Map of Algeria. The maps were divided into sheets, and each sheet covered a specific region of Algeria. 

The sheets were then assembled into a larger atlas, which included a comprehensive overview of the country's geography, geology, and natural resources.

The maps provided information about the location of towns and cities, roads and railways, rivers and lakes, mountains and valleys, and other prominent landmarks across the country.

Also, the Delamarche map included reports that provided information about the climate, vegetation, minerals, forests, arable land, and natural resources of Algeria. These documents were essential for the French government in exploiting the country's natural resources and developing its economy.

The Delamarche maps showed the location of mineral deposits, such as iron, lead, and zinc, and helped the French government to establish mining operations in these areas. The detailed information about the terrain and topography of Algeria also helped the French government to develop transportation infrastructure, such as roads, railways, and ports, which were essential for the transportation of natural resources to markets in France and other parts of Europe.

The Delamarche map also provided information about the distribution of forests and other vegetation in Algeria, which were essential for the production of timber and other forest products. 

This information was used by the French government to establish forestry operations and to develop policies for the management and exploitation of forest resources.

In addition to natural resources, the Delamarche map also provided information about the location of arable land, which was used by the French government to develop agricultural policies and to establish large-scale farming operations in Algeria.

The French government's exploitation of Algeria through the use of the Delamarche map was wrong because it represented a violation of Algeria's sovereignty and territorial integrity. The map, created in the 19th century, was used to justify French colonial rule in Algeria by claiming that large portions of the country were uninhabited or underpopulated. 

This false narrative allowed the French government to claim ownership and control over Algerian land, resources, and people, leading to widespread economic exploitation and human rights abuses. 

Furthermore, the French government's actions undermined Algeria's independence and self-determination, perpetuating a legacy of colonialism and imperialism that continues to affect Algerians to this day. 

More links to articles you will find thought provoking.

  1. That African Fabric You're Wearing Isn’t AfricanThat African Fabric You're Wearing Isn’t African=
  2. About neck elongation ringsAbout neck elongation rings=
  3. Lighthouses of Egypt and MoroccoLighthouses of Egypt and Morocco=
  4. Mental Illness in Africa TaboosMental Illness in Africa Taboos=
  5. Kente cloth inspired by a spiders web Kente cloth inspired by a spiders web=

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=

Comments

Wise African Proverb

Wise African Proverb

More Articles to Read from Chic African Culture

Show more

Week’s Best Posts and Pages

Chad Steamed Honey Cassava Buns

What is the difference between ugali and fufu

Chura Dance Twerking on the Beach in Africa

The Serenity Prayer translated into the 10 most popular African languages