Find your true life work in Africa.

Find your true life work in Africa. Africa is home to more unknown history than known. A map of Africa does not begin to show the vastness of people, culture, food, living and ancient history of the African continent. Established 2008 Chic African Culture is a learning tool to meet the demand for better education about the entire continent of Africa.

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Find your true life work in Africa.

A lion that is caged will hate the one that is free. - with love from your ancestors

Thursday, February 27, 2014

Malva Pudding a Traditional South African Dessert

Malva Pudding a Traditional South African Dessert

Malva Pudding is not only a traditional South African dessert but also a sweet warm cake-like dessert that was loved by Nelson Mandela. Malva pudding is scooped into bowl and topped with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. A vegetarian version can be made by replacing eggs with condensed milk.

Malva Pudding 



Malva Pudding a Traditional South African Dessert



Ingredients

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 large eggs
2 tablespoons apricot jam
1 teaspoon baking soda
A small pinch of salt
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 teaspoon vinegar
3/4 cup whole milk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract


Directions

Cream eggs and sugar add jam mix well. Sieve flour, soda, and salt. Add melted butter, vinegar, vanilla and milk to the egg mixture alternately with the flour. Bake in an ovenproof dish at 350°f 45 minutes. Malva pudding is scooped into a bowl and topped with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.


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Tuesday, February 25, 2014

Xenophobia Dangerous Lies and Treacherous Myths

Xenophobia Lies and Myths in South Africa

One person’s truth is another person’s lie; Xenophobia is the unreasoned fear felt to be foreign or bizarre.



Those who suffer from xenophobia in Africa and around the world live a fearful nonexistent life drenched in xenophobia fervent dangerous lies.

Xenophobia is the unreasoned fear felt to be foreign or bizarre.

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




You have the freedom to discover who you are beyond your language, class, gender, and culture. We believe prejudices and stereotypes about other cultures without finding out the truth for ourselves which leads to racism and xenophobic attitudes.

Xenophobia Dangerous Lies and Treacherous Myths

Foreign nationals in South Africa say they are not taking anyone's jobs. They say that they are targeted because they are hard workers, and succeed at making money honestly. Foreign nationals say South Africans are bitter of their successes and should work with them as African brothers in order to learn valuable skills. The South African Government need to offer skills so South Africans can work skilled jobs instead of depending on menial jobs.



Xenophobia Dangerous Lies and Treacherous Myths


Xenophobia has affirmed indifference to people beyond our own shores, embracing legislation that sharply limits legal immigration; entertaining a further choke hold on admitting immigrants; renouncing commitment to humanitarian ideals and rejecting pleas to help the vulnerable escape from war and bloodshed. Xenophobia is morally inexcusable, those whom Xenophobia shuns include children bereft of family, and survivors of rape, torture, and religious persecution. Africa cannot let Xenophobia define the world’s rich love by a poverty of spirit.

Police have been battling looting and violence in Jeppestown, Malvern and surrounding areas of Johannesburg South Africa for two nights in April 2015 in the latest flare-up of xenophobic violence. Police was on high alert in the Johannesburg after two consecutive nights of rubber bullets, looting and violence forcing a shutdown of a major highway, the M2 Highway.

Locals protested into the early hours demanding foreigners leave the area. They tried to barricade the N2-West highway with rocks but police retaliated with rubber bullets. A Malvern business owner says that although police are doing their best to quell the violence, they seem to be overwhelmed. "They're literally destroying what they destroyed the previous night. The police cannot contain the situation; they're using rubber bullets, these people are barricading themselves with pieces of zinc and metal that they're ripping off the shop fronts."

And, as the death toll from xenophobia linked violence has now risen to six, in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), eThekwini Mayor James Nxumalo is planning walkabouts in refugee camps as well as townships, where locals launched attacks on foreign nationals.

Reports of violent attacks on foreigners have dramatically decreased in the province since a peace march held in the City Centre, where KZN Premier Senzo Mchunu and religious leaders appealed for calm and called on Africans to unite. Foreign nationals living in the point area in Durban's inner city say they believe locals have tried to attack them because they are lazy and have warned that if they leave their expertise many jobs will be lost.

The foreigners have refused to leave the area and say people living in refugee camps around the city are struggling, so they would rather remain in their shops to defend what they have. Residents and business owners barricaded parts of the road in a tense standoff with locals from surrounding townships.

Varfee Kenneth from Liberia says they have benefitted from South Africa's economy because they do not have the same opportunities at home. "We are here in South Africa as brothers and sisters. We are not here to show that we are so special, no. we are West Africans, we believe in hard. We'll have to work hard and sweat, so when you are not doing nothing I'll take that opportunity and something with it because this is not my country."

Four shops belonging to foreigners were vandalized and looted in Cala near Queenstown on Thursday, after the discovery of the body of a woman who had disappeared in the week. Some foreign nationals are now seeking refuge at a local police station. The police's Khaya Tonjeni says police will do anything in their power to make sure lawlessness is not tolerated. "The South African Police Service will do everything within its powers to ensure the safety of all citizens and foreign nationals, and lawlessness will not be tolerated."



Did you know?
In 2017, Nigeria called on the African Union (AU) to intervene as a matter of urgency to halt xenophobic attacks of other African nationals in South Africa.

There are truths on one side of the world, which are falsehoods on the other - African Proverb

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Saturday, February 22, 2014

Umsila Wenkomo or Oxtail Stew a Slow Cooker Recipe




Umsila Wenkomo or Oxtail Stew a Slow Cooker Recipe Photo by Daniel Panev

Umsila Wenkomo means Oxtail Stew in the Xhosa (Koh-Suh) language. Xhosa is one of the official languages of South Africa. Nelson Mandela was of the Xhosa people and Umsila Wenkomo or Oxtail Stew was one of his favorite meals.


Slow Cooker Oxtail Stew Recipe


Ingredients

4 pounds oxtails
2 cups beef broth or stock
2 cups baby carrots
4 medium potatoes unpeeled and quartered
1 hot pepper
1 tablespoon crushed garlic
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon brown sugar
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Add all ingredients except for meat in a large slow cooker and mix well, add meat and simmer on low for 9-10 hours or high 6-7 hours. Serve with white rice.


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Thursday, February 20, 2014

Three Modern African Fiction Must Reads

Three Modern African Fiction Must Reads

Many times people ask me, what is a good fictional book to read on Africa? 




Walking into a bookstore or browsing online, you are immediately hit with the notion that there are millions of books, what is a truly good read?

The African Gourmet top three modern African fiction must read are Someone Knows My Name by Lawrence Hill, Ghana Must Go by Taiye Selasi and The Memory of Love by Aminatta Forna.


Overall, I happily invest three hours a day reading.  I read to understand things I have never been exposed to by grace. Below is a short list of the books that inspired me to learn, grow, and laugh and to be motivated. Please share books you love in the comments section below.




Someone Knows My Name

by Lawrence Hill


Kidnapped from Africa as a child, Aminata Diallo is enslaved in South Carolina but escapes during the chaos of the Revolutionary War. In Manhattan, she becomes a scribe for the British, recording the names of blacks who have served the King and earned their freedom in Nova Scotia. 


But the hardship and prejudice of the new colony prompt her to follow her heart back to Africa, then on to London, where she bears witness to the injustices of slavery and its toll on her life and a whole people.






Ghana Must Go

by Taiye Selasi


Kweku Sai is dead. A renowned surgeon and failed husband, he succumbs suddenly at dawn outside his home in suburban Accra. The news of Kweku’s death sends a ripple around the world, bringing together the family he abandoned years before. Ghana Must Go is their story.










The Memory of Love

by Aminatta Forna


The Memory of Love takes the reader through the haunting atmosphere of a country at war, delicately intertwining the powerful stories of two generations. In contemporary Freetown, a devastating civil war has left an entire populace with secrets to keep. In the capital hospital Kai, a gifted young surgeon is plagued by demons that are beginning to threaten his livelihood.
 


Elsewhere in the hospital lies Elias Cole, a man who has stories to tell from the country’s turbulent postcolonial years that are far from heroic. As past and present intersect, Kai and Elias are drawn unwittingly closer by Adrian, a British psychiatrist with good intentions, and into the path of one woman at the center of their stories.


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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

What is coming does not beat a drum

What is coming does not beat a drum

What is coming does not beat a drum


African Proverb


What is coming does not beat a drum - Malawi Proverb




What is coming does not beat a drum means danger doesn't announce itself with trumpets. This African Proverb is meant to warn that dangerous situations are not announced publicly in advance. By engaging in selfish behavior such as corruption, politicians are effectively subjecting themselves and their country to an ill-fated future. In Malawi, the country’s economic performance has historically been constrained by policy inconsistency, poor infrastructure, and rampant corruption.

About Malawi the warm heart of Africa




 In 1891, present day Malawi was sectioned off and became the British protectorate of Nyasaland.
Malawi


1.         In the year 1480, Bantu tribes unite several smaller political states to form the Maravi Confederacy that at its height includes large parts of present-day Zambia and Mozambique plus the modern state of Malawi.

2.         In 1891, present day Malawi was sectioned off and became the British protectorate of Nyasaland.

3.         Malawi celebrates independence day on July 6, 1964 from the British.

4.         Malawi is named for the East African Maravi kingdom of the 16th century; the word "maravi" means "fire flames".

5.         Christian population of Malawi is around 83%.

6.         Malawi ranks among the world's most densely populated and least developed countries.

7.         Malawi is one of the world's poorest countries with a GDP of around $230.

8.         In 2015, about half of Malawi’s 29 districts were hit by floods, destroying agricultural livelihoods, leaving more than 1,150,000 people affected and 336,000 displaced.

9.         English and Chichewa are both the official languages of Malawi.

10.      The median age of Malawi is 16.5 years old.

Malawi is one of the world's hardest hit by HIV-Aids and home to more than one million children orphaned by the disease.
Malawi

11.      Malawi is one of the world's hardest hit by HIV-Aids and home to more than one million children orphaned by the disease.

12.      Lilongwe is the largest and capital city of Malawi named after the Lilongwe River.

13.      Zomba was the capital of Nyasaland before the establishment of Malawi in 1964.

14.      Malawi is the 38th largest country in Africa.

15.      Malawi is 100th largest country in the world.

16.      Malawi is landlocked and has no coastline.

17.      Malawi is surrounded by Mozambique, Zambia, and Tanzania.

18.      Lake Nyasa, some 580 km long, is the country's most prominent physical feature; it contains more fish species than any other lake on earth.

19.      Lowest point is the junction of the Shire River.

20.      Highest point is Sapitwa (Mount Mlanje) at 3,002 m.

Malawi's economy is predominately agricultural with about 80% of the population living in rural areas.
Malawi

21.      Malawi's flag is three equal horizontal bands of black (top), red, and green with a radiant, rising, red sun centered on the black band; black represents the native peoples, red the bloodshed in their struggle for freedom, and green the color of nature; the rising sun represents the hope of freedom for the continent of Africa

22.      Malawi's economy is predominately agricultural with about 80% of the population living in rural areas.

23.      Population enjoys electricity access, 9%, urban areas 32% and rural areas 4%.

24.      Malawi’s internet users total around 9%.

25.      Currency of Malawi is the kwacha.

26.      Agriculture accounts for about one-third of GDP and 90% of export revenues.

27.      Tobacco accounts for more than half of Malawi’s exports.

28.      The government faces many challenges, including developing a market economy, improving educational facilities, addressing environmental problems, dealing with HIV/AIDS, and satisfying foreign donors on anti-corruption efforts.

29.      Malawi’s national symbol is a lion.

30.      National anthem "Mulungu dalitsa Malawi" (Oh God Bless Our Land of Malawi)

Did you know?
Malawi is known as the warm heart of Africa established in 1891; the British territory of Nyasaland became the independent nation of Malawi in 1964.

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Monday, February 17, 2014

Nelson Mandela Sweet Chicken Recipe

Nelson Mandela Sweet Chicken Recipe
Sweet Chicken was one of Nelson Mandela's favorite dishes.

Sweet Chicken was one of Nelson Mandela's favorite dishes. 

Nelson Mandela's personal chef says he was not a picky eater, he liked traditional down-home food. One of Nelson Mandela's favorite meals was Sweet Chicken. Cooking easy meals like Sweet Chicken satisfied Nelson Mandela and will satisfy the entire family at dinner time.


Xoliswa Ndoyiya in her new book Ukutya Kwasekhaya: Tastes from Nelson Mandela's Kitchen says Sweet Chicken was one of President Nelson Mandela's favorite meals. Xoliswa Ndoyiya started cooking for him two years before he became president, which is over 22 years of cooking meals like Sweet Chicken. Below is our take on one of Nelson Mandela's beloved dishes, Sweet Chicken.


Nelson Mandela Sweet Chicken Recipe



Ingredients



2 skinless chicken breasts

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 cup chicken broth

2 tablespoons curry powder

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 chicken bouillon cube spice

1 cup any sweet marmalade or jam

1 cup nonfat Greek yogurt

Salt and pepper to taste



Directions


Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Season chicken with the spices and add chicken to the pot. Add broth and let sit for about 10 minutes or until juice runs clear. Meanwhile in a large bowl mix yogurt and jam well. Add yogurt mixture to chicken and over low heat cook an additional 5 minutes. Serve with rice.



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Sunday, February 16, 2014

Fatherly Love African Proverbs

Fatherly Love African Proverbs

Fatherly Love African Proverbs; Fatherly love is the greatest gift given to a child.

When you follow in the path of your father, you learn to walk like him. ∽ African Proverb


Fatherly Love African Proverbs



African proverbs, fatherly love is the greatest gift given to a child. Fatherly love African proverbs teach us love holds a child tight, supports the soul and teaches how to love the world in return. African proverbs on the importance of fathers in a child’s emotional and social development set the stage for the path followed by the child later in life.



I love daddy

When you follow in the path of your father, you learn to walk like him. ∽ African Proverb


Hold a child with both hands. ∽ African Proverb


Hold a child with both hands. ∽ African Proverb


Father with his baby in the village of Ngon, Ebolowa District, Cameroon.

Learning expands great souls. ∽ African Proverb


Ethiopia father and son

If a child washes his hands he could eat with kings. ∽ African Proverb


Imvepi Refugee Settlement in Arua District, Northern Uganda

Sticks in a bundle are unbreakable. ∽ African Proverb


A father and his children in Mukono Uganda.


Nobody is born wise. ∽ African proverb





A person is a person because of other persons ∽ African Proverb

Thanks for my child


More information about Africa and African people


Historical African Country Name
Top 20 Largest Countries in Africa
How many countries does Africa have?

Fathers love with eternal bottomless love.


African Water Spirit Mami Wata
Africa and Hate Have Five Things In Common
Ghost towns and wild horses of the African Namib Desert
Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=
Fathers love with eternal bottomless love.

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Friday, February 14, 2014

Nakupenda means Love in Swahili

In the Swahili language, the word Nakupenda means you are in love. Nakupenda is pronounced just as its spelled Na-ku-pen-da.


Swahili is a relatively simple language to learn, mostly because words are pronounced as they are written. Hakuna matata is the most popular quote and means no worries. The phrase gained international recognition after it was used in the animated movie The Lion King.

Nakupenda means Love in Swahili
   

We Love You


Learn the Swahili language of love


Swahili Language Of Love
English Language
Swahili Language
Desire
Hamu
Want
Unataka
Passion
Shauku
I’m Sorry
Samahani
I Love You
Ninakupenda
Appreciation
Shukrani
Devotion
Ibada
Emotion
Hisia
Fondness
Upendo
Friendship
Urafiki
Infatuation
Kupendeza
Lust
Tamaa
Passion
Shauku
Respect
Heshima
Tenderness
Huruma
Yearning
Unataka
Adulation
Adulation
Amity
Uaminifu
Amorousness
Kupendeza
Ardor
Shauku
Attachment
Kiambatisho
Cherishing
Kutamani
Crush
Kuponda
Delight
Furaha
Devotedness
Kujitolea
Enchantment
Uchawi
Enjoyment
Furaha
Fervor
Fervor
Fidelity
Uaminifu
Flame
Moto
Hankering
Kukimbia
Involvement
Ushiriki
Like
Kama
Partiality
Upendeleo
Piety
Uungu
Rapture
Kunyakuliwa
Regard
Tazama
Relish
Furaha
Sentiment
Hisia
Weakness
Udhaifu
Worship
Ibada
Zeal
Bidii
Ardency
Ujasiri
Mad For
Wazimu
Soft Spot
Doa Laini


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Find your true life work in Africa.

A bird sits on a tree it likes - African Proverb

Chic African Culture Featured Articles

Find your true life work in Africa.


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.