Do not find fault with what you do not understand.

How to Barter in Local African Markets

How to Barter in Local African Markets

Bargaining in the local markets of Africa is an ideal way to see local artists at work and get a good insight into the local culture, food, and art.


Bargaining is commonplace throughout Africa

Learn to the art of bartering, bargaining, and haggling in Africa

Bartering, bargaining or haggling is a type of negotiation in which the buyer and seller of goods or services have a difference of opinion on the price which will be paid. 

In many African countries, you can bargain for goods and services such as food, clothes, souvenirs or the assistance of a local tour guide.  

In an African market, your shopping experience where you can bargain and get discounts on almost anything will hone your bargaining skills and directly support the local population. 

Bargaining in the local markets of Africa is an ideal way to see local artists at work and get a good insight into the local culture, food, and art. 

Whether you are immersing yourself in one of Africa’s largest outdoor market Addis Merkato in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, checking out the latest fabrics in Foumban, Cameroon daily outdoor market, or getting souvenirs at a Roque Santeiro Market in Angola, you will love the bargaining experience.

Foumban, Cameroon daily outdoor market

Bargaining is commonplace throughout Africa, first, you should visit many different shops and markets to get a general idea about the average price of what you want to buy. 

Convert the asking price into your own currency then halve the first asking price and start from there but remember to stay polite and have a sense of humor while bargaining, it is supposed to be fun. 

If you are not enjoying the experience, you can always walk away and walking away is a good way to get the price down quickly in some cases. 

If the price is too high or you don't want an item just leave, there will be plenty more opportunities just around the corner. 

Pay with small change; do not show large amounts of money otherwise, the seller may hike the price when it’s discovered that you have lots of cash. 

Sometimes, paying for a local tour guide who knows the local language and the people can be the best way to help you get the perfect price for your hand-carved fetish sculpture.  


Serving local street food photo by dlisbona


Getting to Know more about Africa
African Country Names Your Saying Wrong
What do Waist Beads Symbolize in Africa?
About African Healers and Witchdoctors
Hurricanes are Angry African Ancestors
Highest Temperature and Lowest Temperature in Africa
About African Night Running

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=

This Week’s Best Posts and Pages

Top ten African countries with the most Gold Olympic medals

Using Amen and Ashe or Ase

Percentage of White people living in Africa

Survival of the Fattest, obese Europeans starving Africa

African cultures express, encourage, and communicate energy

Support African History and Culture

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet are dedicated to discovering, collecting and sharing African history and heritage celebrating 14 years of service in 2021. Share and support in the pride of being part of an important cultural and educational resource.



Being African in America I have grown up learning about different ethnic cultures. My father and mother are historians of African culture and history and their influence expanded my activities to several best-selling cookbooks, magazine columns, self-branded products, and a popular African culture and food blog.

Chic African Culture


Be better than average and support African history and culture.