Curiosity is the key to knowledge.

Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

Popular_Topics

The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Monday, November 19, 2018

Growing Rich at Others Expense

Growing Rich at Others Expense

The Intercontinental Exchange on the New York Stock Exchange soft commodities market could not continue without Africa’s Coffee, Cocoa, and Cotton. However, this profit comes at Africa's economic and environmental expense.



Unroasted coffee is Africa’s leading soft commodities value export, cocoa beans are second and cotton lint is the third. The definition of a soft commodity is a resource that is grown rather than mined such as coffee, cocoa, sugar, maize or corn, cotton, and tea. African agricultural influences are far-reaching in the softs markets especially in the case of cotton, cocoa, and coffee.

Africa’s Top 10 most value exported soft commodities according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations are in order cocoa beans, unroasted coffee, cotton lint, rubber natural dry, unmanufactured tobacco, oranges, tea, refined sugar, maize (corn) and unshelled cashew nuts.
Cotton accounts for $3.3 billion, the majority of the African country of Benin revenue


African Coffee, Cocoa, and Cotton


Ethiopia is the world’s fifth largest coffee producer and Africa’s top producer. Coffee is Ethiopia's principal source of income and the world's demand for quality coffee is increasing steadily. More than 15 million people grow the crop for a living, hundreds of thousands of intermediaries are involved in the collection of the crop from farmers and suppliers to the export and domestic market.

A sizable amount of foreign exchange, accounting up to 30% of the total yearly export income, is derived from coffee. Companies outside of the African continent do the work of roasting, packaging, retailing and other assorted workings in the coffee value chain. Africa does not benefit from the processing and manufacturing portion of the coffee bean, only the agricultural.

Africa produces well over 65% of the world’s cocoa beans. Many African countries now grow cocoa trees, Sierra Leone, Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Togo, Nigeria, Cameroon, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Congo, but the main producers are Ghana, Nigeria, and Cote d'Ivoire.


Cotton accounts for well over $3.5 billion, the majority of the African country of Benin revenue. The economy of Benin is dependent on subsistence agriculture, cotton production, and regional trade. The top export is cotton around 40% of $8.3 billion Gross Domestic Product (GDP) or $3.3 billion.



World growing rich at Africa's expense issues to think about


Digging shallow rough trenches in Ghana Africa
Digging shallow rough trenches in Ghana Africa


Many farming areas throughout Africa continue to experience limited economic gains and competitiveness. Poor infrastructure, lack of productive technologies, lack of access to inputs and weak institutions combine to hamper economic gains and competitive growth. 


Western Africa is projected to have over 23 percent of its agricultural and food processing output value generated from crops in 2050. This heavy reliance on crops for export economic gains will render developing economies more vulnerable to global economic abuses.


Sub-Saharan Africa is rich in fertile farming land. However, barely a fraction of fertile agricultural land is being farmed. There are three main causes of hunger in Africa, harmful economic systems, conflict, and an overexploited environment.


Control over resources and income is based on military, political and economic power that typically ends up in the hands of a minority, who live well, while those at the bottom barely survive. Africa grows food for the world but does not profit. 


Africa faces serious environmental challenges, including erosion, desertification, deforestation, and most importantly drought and water shortages, which have increased poverty and hunger by reducing agricultural production and people’s incomes. Humans have caused many of these challenges; the environment can be said to be overexploited.


Share this page

Sunday, November 18, 2018

Too Tall and Too Fat for Love


Too Tall and Too Fat for Love

Too Tall and Too Fat for Love



African Elephant Love Folklore Story





Too tall and too fat for love African tall tale folklore story explores the evils and pleasures of two tall fat people in Southern African have with dating and love.


African Elephant Love Folklore Story


In Southern Africa among the Zulu clans, there is told the story of a man named Silwa who grew up so tall and fat he was banned from the village because he ate up all the crops from the fields and the clan was starving because of his gluttony. 

Silwa cried and wandered into the wilderness alone for many months until one day he met Mthwakazi, a beautiful woman who was also banished from her clan because no man wanted to marry her because she was too tall and too fat. 

Silwa began speaking to Mthwakazi so kindly and affectionately she agreed to stay with him and together they forged for food in the forest and fell in love. Mthwakazi gave birth to four sons, all very tall and strong, who became the ancestors of the mighty Zulu Ndlovu clan.

Did you know?
Ndlovu is a Zulu clan name, meaning elephant. Ndlovu is the most popular surname among African tribes and does not signify a single clan group.

African Elephant Fact or Fiction


Elephants drink water through their trunks like a straw
Although they do use their trunks to drink, the water will not go all the way up. Instead, they will suck the water part way up the trunk and pour it into their mouths.  Elephants drink water through their trunks like a straw is fiction.

Elephants can pick up sounds through their feet
African elephants have excellent hearing; furthermore, African elephants can detect reverberations in the ground with sensory cells in their feet. An elephant will hear these vibrations when they travel to its front feet, up to its legs and shoulder bones and to its middle ear. The elephant will be able to tell where the sound is coming from by comparing the timing of the signals. Elephants can hear with their feet is fact.

Elephants love to eat peanuts
Elephants certainly do not eat peanuts in the wild, and they are not a typical diet for captive animals either. Elephants are the world’s biggest land animals and have to spend 16 to 18 hours a day eating. Elephants love to eat peanuts is fiction.


Share this page

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Breasts in Africa

Breasts in Africa

Sexualisation of Breasts
Breasts in Africa; breasts are less eroticized in some rural African societies where women go topless than in urban societies where breasts are exploited in advertising and in pornography.

Mother breastfeeding her child

Female breasts wield amazing power in Western societies.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Curvy women have leveraged the power of their breasts to manipulate even the most able, self-controlled. Empires have fallen, wills revised, millions of magazines and bras sold, and Super Bowl audiences scandalized.


Breasts in the US are big business, because sex sells. We see women’s breasts everywhere on television, at the movies, in magazines, on billboards. The addictive and harmful nature of porn is likely another reason why women’s breasts have become sexualized.

According to the National Geographic Society’s official website, one of the magazine’s early milestones came when its publishers decided that from then on out, they would show native peoples as they were, including when photographed nude. In the case of November 1896, that month’s issue included a photograph of a topless Zulu bride and groom from South Africa.

The message conveyed is that nudity is not necessarily “pornographic” in nature, but that it has a legitimate, academic place when studying world cultures. The African culture knew breastfeeding is the best way to feed baby and breasts are for nourishing life, not giving pleasure.

Health extension worker Elsebeth Aklilu refers to a family health card while counselling Kedo Abdula, who is holding her 21-month-old daughter, Fenete Abdela, on best nutrition practices, at the health post in the village of Maderia, in Gemechis, a woreda (district) of Oromia Region.

One problem is other cultures see bare breasted African women as lacking modesty, that they are closer to animals, that they are loose and want sex all the time. However, in the 18th and 19th centuries, at the same time National Geographic displayed bare breasted African women for scientific cultural purposes, in the Victorian age there were and still are taboos and social stigmas against showing nakedness, including showing your ankles or wearing pants.

The images of bare chested African women were disgraceful to say the least and African women were seen as heathens and not real people. No breach of etiquette elucidates the point more than the Victorian taboo about female toplessness. A taboo persists to the present day.

In Africa, women were not taught to be ashamed of their bodies, ashamed of being naked. The African culture knew breastfeeding is the best way to feed baby and breasts are for nourishing life, not giving pleasure.


Breasts are less eroticized in most African societies where women go topless than in more industrialized societies where breasts are exploited in advertising and in pornography.
African moms breastfeeding children
Did you know?
The average woman's breasts have increased from a 34B in the 1960s to 36DD today.



Share this page

Tuesday, November 13, 2018

African Hunter Never Returned Folklore

African Hunter Never Returned Folklore

Goes away promising to return but never does

African Hunter Never Returned Folklore


Guluwe was a hunter of great renown, who crossed the Kei on the Wild Coast, in the Eastern Cape, South Africa with Khakhabay, the great grandfather of the late Sandile. No man was ever so skillful and successful in the pursuit of game as Guluwe.

However, when Khakhabay took possession of the Amatolas densely forested mountains, which he purchased from the Zulu chief Kohho, he found them infested by great numbers of Bushmen. One day Guluwe, who had two young men with him, killed an eland, but while he was still shouting his cry of triumph. "Tsi! ha! ha! ha! ha! The weapons of Khakhabay!" he was surprised by a number of these inhuman looking Pygmies.

They said "Look at the sun for the last time; you shall kill no more of our game." Guluwe offered them a large quantity of dacha wild hemp, used for smoking for his ransom. One of the Pygmies was unwilling to spare him, but all the rest agreed. They kept him with them while he pretended to send the two young men for the dacha, but privately he told them not to return.

The Bushmen then commenced to eat the eland. They ate that day, and all that night, never ceasing to watch Guluwe. The next morning they asked him when the young men would be back with the dacha, and he replied that he did not expect them before sunset.

The Pygmies, gorged with meat, then lay down to sleep, all except the one who advised that Guluwe should not be spared. That one watched a while longer, but at length he too was overcome by drowsiness. Guluwe then with his spear put one after another to death, until, forgetting himself, he shouted his cry

"Tsi! ha! ha! ha! ha! Izikali zika Rarabe!"

This awakened the bushman who had advised that he should be killed; he now sprang to his feet and escaped, calling out as he ran with the speed of the wind: "I said this Guluwe of the Khakhabays should be destroyed; you who are dead perished for not following my advice."

Zulu African Proverb
Yimbini yezolo yakwa Gxuluwe
Guluwe's two of yesterday.
This is a saying of anyone who goes away promising to return, and does not do so. It had its origin in an event that happened many generations back.

African folklore is African art history


Share this page

Sunday, November 11, 2018

Women Farmers Today

Help African Women Farmers

Protect Africa’s farmers particularly women against large-scale land purchases, social, cultural and legal barriers.



Around the world, there are distinct roles given to women, farming is still a man’s world. Gender inequalities reflect a mix of social, cultural and legal barriers to women’s participation in the farming financial system. Africa’s vast untapped potential in funding farms for women could become a source of rural prosperity and more balanced economic growth.



Agriculture has always played a fundamental role in the lives of people on the African continent. Whether the food is grown for household consumption or for sale women farmers contribute heavily to Africa’s agriculture. Around the world, there are distinct roles given to women. Women are also traditionally responsible for preparing food for their families. Almost half of the agricultural workers in sub-Saharan Africa are women, however; African women farms are far less productive than their African male counterparts.


Agriculture has always played a fundamental role in the lives of people on the African continent.

Millions of female African farmers face a range of problems, including traditional attitudes of the role of women, denied access to owning land and claiming the land of a dead spouse or relative land not understanding their right under the law, access to credit and productive farm inputs like fertilizers, pesticides and farming tools and problems obtaining loans. 


According to Africa's Progress Panel report in March 2018, only one in five Africans has any form of account at a formal financial institution, with the poor, rural dwellers and women facing the greatest disadvantage. Such financial exclusion undermines opportunities for reducing poverty and boosting growth. The gender gap is particularly marked in Cameroon, Mauritania, Mozambique, and Nigeria, smallholder farmers, and agriculture productivity at the center of national food security and nutrition strategies, with a focus on women farmers.



When women farmers have access to finance – credit, savings, and insurance – they can insure themselves against risks such as drought, and invest more effectively in better seeds, fertilizers, and pest control. With access to decent roads and storage, women farmers can get their harvests to market before they rot in the fields. Trade barriers and inadequate infrastructure are preventing women farmers from competing effectively. The African food system is under needless acute and rising pressure.


Share this page

Saturday, November 10, 2018

Ile-Ife Ancient Yoruba City Southwestern Nigeria

Ile-Ife Ancient Yoruba City Southwestern Nigeria

Ile-Ife
Ile Ife is said to be dated back around 500 B.C. when it was founded and is the oldest Yoruba city.
Ile Ife is said to be dated back around 500 B.C. when it was founded and is the oldest Yoruba city.

The Ooni of Ife is the traditional head and is highly revered amongst the Yoruba.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



Ile-Ife is the ancestral and spiritual home for all Yorubas.


Yoruba weavers
Yoruba weavers c. 1939

The Yoruba are one of the three largest ethnic groups of Nigeria, also living in Benin and northern Togo. Yoruba have traditionally been among the most skilled and productive artisans of Africa.


The Yoruba city of Ile-Ife has a powerful religious significance as the site of the earth’s creation according to Yoruba mythology.



Interesting facts about Ile-Ife


·        Ile-Ife is one of the oldest towns of the Yoruba people.

·        Ile-Ife is considered by the Yoruba to be a holy city and the legendary birthplace of humankind, it was held to have been founded by a son of the deity Oduduwa.

·        Ile-Ife is the chief religious centre for the Yoruba.

·        King of the Yoruba also known as Oranyan, was a Yoruba king from the kingdom of Ile-Ife.

·        Opa Oranmiyan or Oranmiyan’s Staff in Ile-Ife was constructed by the family of Oranmiyan Omoluabi Odede the Great Prince of Ife and King of the Yorubas as a commemorative monument at the place where he died. This was to be around the year 1300.

·        According to oral traditions, Opa Oranmiyan was used as a walking stick by the giant Oranmiyan.

·        The person in charge of the monument in Ile Ife today is called the Akogun of Ife, Akogun meaning the Brave Warrior.


·        Obafemi Awolowo University (OAU) Ife was founded in 1962 as the University of Ife but christened by the Federal Military Government as Obafemi Awolowo University on May 12, 1987.

Share this page

Tuesday, November 6, 2018

African Pink Rice Island

African Pink Rice Island
Madagascar Pink Rice
Madagascar Pink Rice is produced near Madagascar’s large inland lake, Lake Alaotra.

History of Madagascar Pink Rice is extensive on the African island of Madagascar.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Rice forms the staple of most meals in Madagascar however, Madagascar rice economy is very fragile due to too much rain or not enough rain.

African Pink Rice Island


Madagascar’s economy is very fragile; the country imports significant amounts of rice from international markets for everyday consumption, around 51 percent.
Planting rice in Madagascar 

What is Madagascar pink rice?


All rice starts as a whole grain, which means that the germ and bran layer is intact. When these are removed, you have white rice. The most common bran layer for rice is brown. However, there are also red and black grains of rice. Some kinds of rice are partially milled, so some of the bran layers are left on. These grains of rice tend to be light tan, pink or even a striated color. Lotus Foods Madagascar Pink Rice is rice that is partially milled retaining 66% of its bran layer retaining a high level of nutrition, but cooks faster and has a texture that is closer to white rice.



Since the year 2007, the US rice-importing company Lotus Foods has been working with the Coopérative Koloharena Ivolamiarina Besarety, Amparafaravolato market special pink rice, called Varini Dista, named after the farmer who popularized the rice. The Koloharena Ivolamiarina is part of the Confederation Nationale Sahavanona Koloharena, established in 1999, as the national office for 29 Koloharena farmer cooperatives including 950 village-based associations are committed to increasing small-farm income using environmentally sound farming methods. The cooperatives are concentrated along the threatened, humid forest in eastern Madagascar.


The rice production technologies used in Madagascar are still largely traditional, rice production is still largely highly labor intensive. Rice cultivation is found almost everywhere in Madagascar. Lowland rice production structures are well developed and rice terraces are regularly found along the roads between the capital and largest city in Madagascar Antananarivo and the third largest city in Madagascar Antsirabe.

Madagascar’s economy is very fragile; the country imports significant amounts of rice from international markets for everyday consumption, around 51 percent. Madagascar rice growers know that rice production is all about water and timing. The rice grain needs a lot of water at first, but if torrential rains fall at harvest time, they can destroy the crop. 


Rice is a hugely important part of life on the island nation off the southeastern coast of Africa. At times, it shows up for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. In much of the country, it dominates the landscape, planted in small plots across millions of acres of land.
  


The average household income in Madagascar is less than $1.25 making Madagascar an extremely low-income African country according to the World Bank Standards. 
As prices increase for rice as well as other major staples of cassava and maize, most small farmers benefit little or not at all from price increases. Other major agricultural products in Madagascar are coffee, vanilla, sugarcane, cloves, cocoa, manioc, tapioca, beans, bananas, peanuts, and livestock products.


How to cook Madagascar pink rice


Combine 1 ¾ cups of water, 1 cup rice and a pinch of salt. Bring to a boil over high heat. Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat. Let stand covered for a few minutes. Fluff and serve. A rice cooker may be used with the same water-to-rice ratio.


Did you know?
Madagascar was one of the last major landmasses on earth to be colonized by humans. Madagascar’s population consists of 18 main ethnic groups, all of whom speak the same Malagasy language. Most Malagasy are multi-ethnic, however, reflecting the island’s diversity of settlers and historical contacts.

Share this page

Saturday, November 3, 2018

African Chicken Stew

Make an African Chicken Groundnut Stew Recipe You Can Be Proud Of

West African food
African stew recipe that is easy to make and can be made vegan, vegetarian or with chicken.
Make an African Chicken Groundnut Stew Recipe You Can Be Proud Of

Best Ever African Chicken Groundnut Stew


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




African groundnut stew with chicken is a hearty traditional African stew recipe


African groundnut stew with chicken is a hearty traditional African stew recipe

Best Ever African Chicken Groundnut Stew


Prep time: 20 min Cook time: 20 min Total time: 40 min

Ingredients
2 large chicken breasts, chopped
1 medium sliced onion
1 medium chopped green pepper
1 cup smooth peanut butter
3 cups chicken broth
2 cups baby carrots
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon red pepper flake
1 tablespoon tomato paste
Salt to taste

Directions
Boil chicken in 2 1/2 cups of chicken broth in a large pot for 10 minutes. Add onion, chopped pepper, carrots, tomato paste, salt, and cayenne pepper to chicken broth. Cook for 10 minutes. Add remaining broth to peanut butter and mix well. Add peanut butter to remaining ingredients and simmer for 10 minutes. Serve over rice or with Injera bread.


Share this page

Saturday, October 27, 2018

Angry African Proverbs

Angry words are like a fist African Proverbs

Zulu wise words

Angry words are like a fist but the tongue of the wise brings healing.

Postpone today's anger until tomorrow.

We must always be mindful of the words that we say to one another.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Watch what you say, you may not realize sharp, angry words create lasting damage.



Words are like fruit; once they fall down, they cannot return up. – Zulu Proverb


African Proverbs About Anger


Angry words are like a fist but the tongue of the wise brings healing.

The fool starts in his blood.

Fire in the heart sends smoke into the head.

Fire in the heart sends smoke into the head.

Excess perforates the drum.

Postpone today's anger until tomorrow.

Postpone today's anger until tomorrow.

Curse has no cure.

You do not bite the back of the person carrying you.

You do not bite the back of the person carrying you.

The angry person screams to air.

Share this page

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Sesame Seed in Africa


Sesame Seed Varieties and Info in Africa

Sesame Seed in Africa


Like many plants, sesame seeds were brought to the United States from Africa during the late 16th early 17th century during the slave trade.


Sesame seeds were one of the first crops processed for oil.


The black sesame plant is an important plant in Sierra Leone, the seeds are often used to facilitate childbirth, heal sprains and make, and excellent seasoning called ogiri. The leaves of the sesame plant are also used as laxative and as topical remedy to heal stings of scorpions.


Sierra Leone is extremely poor and nearly half of the working-age population engages in subsistence agriculture. The sesame plant is native to west and central Africa and cultivated before written history. This plant grows wild in savanna and other habitat types. It is also grows abandoned in fields and farms and can grow on poor, rocky soils and it flowers even through drought conditions.


Sesame seeds were one of the first crops processed for oil. Adding sesame seeds to baked goods can be traced back to ancient Egyptian times from an ancient tomb painting that depicts a baker adding the seeds to bread dough.


Types of Sesame Seeds

Sesame Seed Bagle


Black sesame seeds, Brown sesame seeds and White sesame seeds

The darker the seed the stronger the flavor.

Black sesame seeds are used for their medicinal properties, as their aroma and flavor are quite strong. Since black sesame, seeds have a strong aroma and rich flavor, use them for stews, marinades and some sweets.


Brown sesame seeds are popularly used for oil extraction purpose. These are non-hulled seeds, and are widely used in cereals, candies, granola, and bakery items.


White sesame seeds are used in making bakery products and are the most widely used seeds in the market



Two traditional sesame seed recipes in Sierra Leone

Brown sesame seeds


In Sierra Leone sesame seeds are traditionally prepared in two ways:


1.   Toasted and ground into a powder, which is mixed with rice flour and water to obtain benni mix, a nutritious children’s food.



2.   Boiled for a long time and left to ferment in closed jute sacks to obtain a powder, which is wrapped in banana leaves and smoked. The resulting product, ogiri, is one of the most common seasonings in Sierra Leone, used to flavor soups and other dishes. It must be used with caution, as the pungent smell can become offensive if used in large quantities. It should also be cooked for at least 10-15 minutes to minimize its strong odor.




Did you know…


Tanzania in East Africa is the world’s largest producer of sesame seeds.

Sesame has one of the highest oil contents of any seed.

Sesame seeds are an excellent source of copper, a very good source of manganese, and a good source of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, iron, zinc, molybdenum, vitamin B1, selenium and dietary fiber.


Share this page

Saturday, October 20, 2018

Hair DIY African Shea Butter and Honey

Hair DIY African Shea Butter and Honey Unisex Natural Deep Conditioner

Thick healthy hair, the natural way

Ingredients for hair conditioner are found at local markets and mixing the ingredients is easy. Add easy hair DIY African Shea Butter and Honey All-Natural Hair Conditioner for men and women to your hair regimen for thick healthy hair.

Unisex Natural Deep Conditioner for Healthy Natural Hair


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




One walk down the hair care aisle of the drugstore and you will see dozens of different conditioners and styling products for men and women.

Conditioner does as its name suggests rather than cleansing strands, it conditions the hair follicle and the effects are immediate. Using a conditioner is especially important if your hair is dry or thin. Conditioners contain ingredients that coat individual hairs so they look thicker and do not tangle as easily. No need for his and hers hair conditioner products, there is little difference between the sexes when it comes to hair.

What is shea butter?


African shea butter is cream-colored oil extracted from the nut of the African shea tree. Shea butter is made from the oil of the shea tree and has earned the name woman's gold in Africa because of its economic value to African women.

Types of shea butter


1.   Raw shea butter is butter is shea butter which has not been filtered or molded into shapes.

2.   Unrefined shea butter is filtered and sometimes molded.

3.   Refined shea butter has undergone processing to remove its odor.

4.   Ultra-Refined Shea Butter has been significantly filtered and processed, which almost always loses the natural goodness of the shea nut.

*Both raw and unrefined shea butter have a distinctive odor, if you add a few drops of high grade essential oil this will improve the scent.

No need for his and hers hair conditioner products, there is little difference between the sexes when it comes to hair. Add easy DIY African Shea Butter and Honey All-Natural Hair Conditioner to your homemade recipe hair files for thick healthy hair.

Shea Butter and Honey All-Natural Hair Conditioner


Ingredients:
2 cups Greek yogurt
3 tablespoons raw shea butter
1 very, very ripe banana
2 tablespoons raw honey

Directions:

Thoroughly stir the honey, banana and shea butter together in a small saucepan over medium heat. Remove from heat cool, then add yogurt. Apply evenly to sectioned hair.  Cover hair with a shower cap for 30 minutes.  Rinse with warm water. 



Did you know?

It takes approximately 20 years for a tree to bear fruit and produce nuts used in making shea butter.


Share this page

Chic African Culture Featured Articles

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.
Be the good

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

Wise Words


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.