African Culture is World Heritage

African Proverb

African Proverb
Distance diminishes the elephant

Upmarket Peanut Butter Okra Stew

<br /> Upmarket Peanut Butter Okra Stew<br />




Let's Make Upmarket Peanut Butter Okra Stew Together.



Okra is a popular vegetable which originated from present-day Ethiopia in Africa. Stewed African Okra Soup is made with peanut butter, tomatoes, corn and spices to create a flavorful filling soup the entire family will love.


Okra originated from present-day Ethiopia in Africa
Get this easy-to-follow Stewed African Peanut Butter Okra side-dish from the African Gourmet. Okra is a popular vegetable which originated from present-day Ethiopia in Africa.

Prep time: 20 min
Cook time: 20
Total time: 40 min

Ingredients
2 cups of fresh or frozen okra
3 ripe tomatoes, chopped
1 cup canned whole kernel corn
1 medium onion, chopped
1 bunch green onions, chopped
2 tablespoons palm oil
½ teaspoon red pepper flake
1 tablespoon peanut butter
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon sugar
2 cups vegetable broth or water

Directions
In a large pot over medium heat, sauté palm oil and onions until the onions become translucent, about 2 minutes. Add green onions and mix well. Add tomatoes and dry seasonings. Cook about 10 minutes. Add okra, corn, peanut butter and broth, cover and simmer on low for about 20 minutes. Serve over rice or as a side dish.

How do you cook okra?

Young okra seed pods are eaten steamed or boiled, as a vegetable or in stews and curries. Seeds from mature pods must be cooked to make them safe to eat, and then pounded into a paste rich in protein. Use okra leaves to flavor stews and soup. The fruit and leaves can be put into stews and soup. Okra can be fried using cornmeal, eggs, fresh okra and spices fried in vegetable oil until golden brown. Okra and tomatoes are in season at the same time and the acidity in tomatoes counteracts the sliminess of okra. Gumbo is a famous New Orleans dish using okra as the main ingredient. Just remember, when preparing, remember that the more it is cut, the slimier it will become.

Are there different varieties of okra?

Okra is also called bhindi, gumbo and lady's finger. Some of its cousins are also food: the cassava-like leaves of a West African variety (A. manihot), the aromatic seeds of another East African variety (A. moschatus), and the succulent fruit and sour leaves of Roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa). Popular okra varieties in the United States are the Clemson variety dark green with angular pods. This okra takes less than two months to mature. Emerald type is dark green, with smooth round pods. Lee is a spineless type known by its deep bright green, very straight angular pods. Annie Oakley is a hybrid, spineless kind of okra with bright green, angular pods. It takes less than two months from seeding to maturity. Chinese okra is dark green in color and reaches 10 to 13 inches in length. These extra-long okra pods are sometimes called ladyfingers. Purple okra a rare variety you may see at peak times. They are all grown in the same way.

Are okra and cotton plants related?

Yes, they are, as a member of the Malvaceae or Mallow family, okra is related to cotton, cocoa, and hibiscus plants. Other related plants are the marshmallow, African-queen, fan leaf, wild hollyhock, checkerbloom and wissadula. Another interesting fact about okra is the ripe seeds of okra are sometimes roasted and ground as a substitute for coffee.


African food recipes are easy to make at home.

Okra originated from present-day Ethiopia in Africa


Read more facts and food recipes about Africa

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Meet Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet.


Being African in America I have grown up learning about different ethnic cultures. My mother is a historian of African culture and history and her influence expanded my activities to several best-selling cookbooks, magazine columns, self-branded products, and a popular African culture and food blog.

Elegant but earthy The African Gourmet and Chic African Culture highlights African culture, food recipes, modern and ancient history.