African Culture is World Heritage

Love Africa

Love Africa
Love Knowledge Love Africa

South African Freedom Amasi Scones Recipe

Many South Africans grew up drinking sour fermented milk or Amasi; it is regarded as a traditional food.

Amasi is sour tasting, great for baking and can be used as a substitute for buttermilk
Amasi Scones 
In the book Long Walk to Freedom, written by Nelson Mandela he mentions how he hurriedly left his hideout at a white friend’s apartment when he was one the run from the South African Apartheid government after he overheard two Zulu labors comment that it was strange to see milk on the windowsill left out to ferment.

The two labors were referring to amasi or fermented milk, an ancient probiotic drink popular with many South African tribes but especially with the Xhosa, Afrikaans and Zulu. Amasi is sour tasting, great for baking and can be used as a substitute for buttermilk.

African food recipes are easy to make at home.

South African Long Walk To Freedom Amasi Scones Recipe

Ingredients

2 cups cake flour, sifted
½ cup butter, softened
1 cup fresh blueberries
1 large egg
1 cup Amasi
¼ cup cream
3 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon white sugar
1 egg, beaten for glazing

Directions

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Put the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar into a mixing bowl. Rub butter into the flour mixture, using your fingertips, until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs. 

Beat egg and Amasi together. Make a well in the center of the flour and add Amasi mixture. Using a butter knife gently cut into the liquid to form soft dough. Place the dough on a lightly floured surface and gently roll to a thickness of 2 cm. 

Cut out rounds using a cookie-cutter. Place the scones on a greased baking tray. Brush the tops with egg. Bake for 10 - 12 minutes or until puffed up and golden brown.


Making amasi is easy
Take make amasi fermented milk simply leave raw milk to naturally ferment at room temperature in a clay pot until thick curds form this may take 2–3 days. 

 Chic African Culture The African Gourmet Logo

Popular posts from this blog

Nature Holds Many Secrets | Hurricanes, Angry African Ancestors

Survival of the Fattest, obese Europeans starving Africa

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa