--> Skip to main content

Nature or merchandise the Sexualisation of African Breasts

Nature or merchandise the Sexualisation of African Breasts
Mother feeding breast milk to her child in Ethiopia

Breasts are less sexualized in most African traditional societies where women go topless. In most other societies breasts are exploited in advertising and in pornography.

Nature or merchandise, the Sexualisation of Breasts


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




The Sexualisation of Breasts


One example of the African culture understanding the natural importance of breasts is the Temple of Horus at Edfu built between 237 BC and 57 BC.
Isis breastfeeding young Horus
Female breasts wield amazing power in some societies. Curvy women have leveraged the power of their breasts to manipulate even the most able, self-controlled. Empires have fallen, wills revised, millions of magazines and bras sold, and Super Bowl audiences scandalized.

Breasts in the US are big business, because sex sells. Women’s breasts are everywhere on television, at the movies, in magazines, and on billboards. The addictive and harmful nature of porn is likely another reason why women’s breasts have become sexualized.

According to the National Geographic Society’s official website, one of the magazine’s early milestones came when its publishers decided that from then on out, they would show native peoples as they were, including when photographed nude. 

In the case of November 1896, that month’s issue included a photograph of a topless Zulu bride and groom from South Africa.  The message conveyed is that nudity is not necessarily “pornographic” in nature, but that it has a legitimate, academic place when studying world cultures. One problem is other cultures see bare breasted African women as lacking modesty, that they are closer to animals, that they are loose and want sex all the time. 

The African culture understood, even from ancient times, breastfeeding is the best way to feed baby and breasts are for nourishing life, not giving pleasure.
Breastfeeding African mother
However, in the 18th and 19th centuries, at the same time National Geographic displayed bare breasted African women for scientific cultural purposes, in the Victorian age there were and still are taboos and social stigmas against showing nakedness, including showing your ankles or wearing pants. The images of bare chested African women were disgraceful to say the least and African women were seen as heathens and not real people.


No breach of etiquette elucidates the point more than the Victorian taboo about female toplessness. A taboo persists to the present day. In Africa, women were not taught to be ashamed of their bodies, ashamed of being naked. The African culture understood, even from ancient times, breastfeeding is the best way to feed baby and breasts are for nourishing life, not giving pleasure. 

One example of the African culture understanding the natural importance of breasts is the Temple of Horus at Edfu built between 237 BC and 57 BC. The Temple of Edfu is an ancient Egyptian temple, located on the west bank of the Nile in Edfu, Upper Egypt. Carved on the Edfu Temple walls is Isis breast-feeding young Horus. The child Horus is depicted in the form of naked boy with his hand held up against his mouth or huddle up on his mother Isis' lap who is breastfeeding him.


Did you know

Many boys will start to develop breasts in their teenage years. This can be quite alarming for them, but it is perfectly normal and the breast tissue will disappear later on. Breast growth in boys - usually around the ages of 12-14 - is caused by a lag in the production of testosterone. Background levels of female hormones may cause the breast to grow. As soon as testosterone levels increase, they will swamp the female hormone and the breast growth will disappear. Up to a third of boys experience some breast development on one or both sides. This causes great worry and embarrassment for the affected boy.

More information about Africa and African people


Historical African Country Name
Top 20 Largest Countries in Africa
How many countries does Africa have?

Economic and social structures have been involved in the sexualization of breasts when women's breasts are from nature, advertisers ignore and exploit reproduction.


African Water Spirit Mami Wata
Africa and Hate Have Five Things In Common
Ghost towns and wild horses of the African Namib Desert
Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=

Popular posts from this blog

Survival of the Fattest, obese Europeans starving Africa

Survival of the Fattest

Rich get richer Survival of the Fattest, obese Europeans starving Africa
Survival of the Fattest is a sculpture of a small starving African man, carrying Lady Justice, a huge obese European woman who is a symbol of the rich world. Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture
5-12-2016

Survival of the Fattest Meaning
The copper statue Survival of the Fattest by Jens Galschiøt and Lars Calmar was created in 2002. The fat woman is holding a pair of scales as a symbol of justice however; she is closing her eyes so the justice. Galschiot symbolized the woman as being blind, refusing to see the obvious injustice.
For the rich people of the world the main issue in life is that of overeating while people in the third world are dying every day from hunger. 
The misery of imbalanced wealth distribution is creating floods of refugees. However the rich only want to preserve their privileges and take measures so harsh against the poor, they betray their morals …

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa

Charging Cell Phones Rural Africa

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa

The simple task of charging a cell phone is no simple matter in rural African villages far from an electric grid.
With the advent of tiny rooftop solar panels electricity could be accessible to millions.
African governments are struggling to meet to electric needs of the poorest of the poor living in rural areas. 

Living off-grid may be a lifestyle choice to some and a fact of everyday living to the poorest of the poor. However, tiny rooftop solar panels and high-efficiency LED lights across the African continent could provide enough electricity to charge cell phones. 

Cell phones are vital for people in rural areas with no access to banks in order to send and receive money, access medical care and stay in contact with family and friends.
What does Off-Grid Mean? Off the grid (off-grid) means creating your own self-sufficient environment and being able to operate completely independently of all trad…

South African Beef Curry Recipe

Perfect South African Apricot Beef Curry RecipeSouth African beef curry recipe is a South African food recipe to share around the world while learning about South Africa rainbow nation food history and favorite recipes of Black African, Colored mixed race ancestry, White, and Indian.

South African Beef Curry RecipeWhen it comes to quick and satisfying slow cooker crockpot meals South African Apricot Beef Curry recipe is at the top of the African food dinner recipe list. Use your slow cooker for this simple South African Apricot Beef Curry recipe, it is full of apricot jam, spices and tender beef to serve with rice and grilled bread. How to Make Perfect South African Apricot Beef Curry Recipe
Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture By Chic African Culture
African food recipe

South Africa food is one of the most diverse on the African continent. South African apricot beef curry is an easy delicious slow cooker dinner recipe to make on a weeknight.
South African Apricot Bee…
Peace, Love and Happiness to You Today