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Red African Roses Growing in Kenya

Red African Roses Growing in Kenya.

The production of a diverse range of rose cultivars in Kenya has contributed to its position as the largest exporter of roses in the world.

Kenya is the world's largest exporter of roses, and the country produces a wide variety of rose cultivars such as Hybrid tea roses, these roses are known for their large, full blooms and their long vase life. They are a popular choice for cut flowers. 

The rose industry in Kenya has been booming

Floribunda roses are known for their clusters of small, colorful blooms. They are a popular choice for landscaping and for cut flowers. Grandiflora roses are a cross between hybrid tea roses and floribunda roses. They have the large blooms of hybrid tea roses and the abundance of blooms of floribunda roses. Polyantha roses are known for their small, bushy growth habit and their clusters of small, colorful blooms. They are a popular choice for landscaping and for cut flowers. Miniature roses are small, compact plants that produce clusters of small, colorful blooms. They are a popular choice for container gardening and for cut flowers.

The rose industry in Kenya has been booming in recent years, making it the largest producers and exporters of roses in the world. This industry has become a crucial source of income for the country, providing employment opportunities for thousands of people and contributing significantly to the country's GDP. The story of the Kenyan rose industry began in the late 1980s, when a group of Dutch entrepreneurs started to experiment with rose cultivation in Kenya's fertile highlands. 

They found that the cool temperatures and abundant sunlight were ideal for growing roses, and soon established a thriving industry. Today, Kenya exports over 70% of its roses to the European Union, with the rest going to other markets in the Middle East and Asia. The rose industry in Kenya is concentrated in the Naivasha area, located about 90 km northwest of Nairobi. The region has an altitude of around 2,000 meters above sea level, which makes it ideal for growing roses. 

The climate is cool and humid, with an average temperature of 18-22 degrees Celsius. The area is also near Lake Naivasha, which provides a reliable source of water for irrigation. One of the main advantages of the Kenyan rose industry is the availability of cheap labor. Most of the workers are women, who are paid a minimum wage of around $2.50 per day. These workers are responsible for tasks such as planting, pruning, harvesting, and packing the roses for export. 

Red Rose from Kenya

The industry has also created jobs in related sectors such as transport, logistics, and packaging. The process of growing roses in Kenya involves several stages. It starts with the preparation of the land, which includes tilling, leveling, and applying fertilizers. The roses are then planted in greenhouses, where they are carefully monitored for pests and diseases. The plants are fed with a special nutrient mix, and the temperature and humidity levels are controlled to ensure optimal growth. After about four months, the roses are ready for harvesting. 

This is done manually, with workers carefully cutting the stems and placing them in buckets of water. The roses are then taken to the packing area, where they are sorted by color, size, and quality. The stems are trimmed, and the roses are placed in boxes lined with special wax paper to protect them during transportation. The Kenyan rose industry faces several challenges, including competition from other rose-producing countries such as Ecuador and Colombia, and the high cost of energy and transportation. 

However, the industry has been able to overcome these challenges through innovation and technology. For example, some growers have invested in solar panels to generate electricity for their greenhouses, while others have adopted new packaging techniques to reduce the risk of damage during transportation. In conclusion, the Kenyan rose industry has become an important source of income and employment for the country, providing thousands of jobs and contributing significantly to the economy.

The industry has faced challenges but has been able to overcome them through innovation and technology. With its favorable climate and abundant labor supply, the Kenyan rose industry is likely to continue thriving in the coming years, making Kenya one of the world's top producers and exporters of roses.

The main production areas for Kenya’s floriculture are around Lake Naivasha, Mt. Kenya, Nairobi, Thika, Kiambu, Athi River, Kitale, Nakuru, Kericho, Nyandarua, Trans Nzoia, Uasin Gichu and Eastern Kenya.  Since the start of February 2018, 5.22 million rose stems had been imported from Kenya, up by nearly 850,000 roses in the same period last year.

Special varieties of Kenyan roses are the Akito rose which is a large, white rose with a classic, elegant shape. It is known for its strong stem and long vase life, making it a popular choice for wedding bouquets and other special occasions. Red Naomi is a deep red rose with a velvety texture and a large bloom. It is prized for its intense color and strong fragrance. High Society is a pink rose with a ruffled edge and a delicate fragrance. It is a popular choice for Valentine's Day and other romantic occasions. Sorbet is a bi-colored rose with pink and cream petals. It has a sweet fragrance and a unique, eye-catching appearance. Grand Gala is a bright red rose with a large, full bloom. It is a classic choice for romantic occasions and is often used in floral arrangements.

Every rose may have a thorn, but it also has a meaning. Sought-after through the ages for it’s simple beauty and intoxicating fragrance, whether imported from Kenya or grown in your backyard, rose colors have very different symbolic meanings.

Lavender is a rare color for the rose.

Rose Color Meanings Growing in Kenyan Gardens

Dark Red Roses.

Similar to the common red rose, the dark red means a deep unconscious beauty. You might consider sending to someone who does not know just how special he or she really is to you.

Green Roses.  

The green rose, although rare, is a symbol for fertility. Abundance in not just the material things that life offers but of the intangible things such as newly formed friendships, good health of loved ones among others. Green roses are best given to those whom you wish happiness and many blessings.

Lavender Roses.     

Lavender is a rare color for the rose. It incites fantasies and imagination for many. Lavender roses are the perfect choice for those who want to enchant or charm someone. Tradition has it, too, that a lavender rose is used to show feelings of love at first sight.

Orange Roses.

The color orange, with the vivid color seemingly emanating a blazing energy, is often associated with desire, enthusiasm and interest. Like the red rose, the orange rose is also taken as a symbol for passion and excitement, an expression of zealous romance. A bouquet of this variety sends a powerful and meaningful message to the recipient. An orange rose tells someone you are interested in knowing them. The color orange, with the vivid color seemingly emanating a blazing energy, is often associated with desire, enthusiasm and interest.

Peach Roses.   

Similar to a warm yellow rose that sends out feelings of warm friendship and companionship, a peach rose is said to symbolize appreciation. It expresses gratitude as well, and at times, sympathy. A bouquet of bright colored - peach roses could make any person happy especially when they are at the lowest times of their lives.

Pink Roses.     

The color pink is the symbol for grace and elegance. Often, the pink rose is given to others as a way of saying how much one appreciates the recipient of the rose. Pink roses also convey feelings of gratitude, appreciation and happiness. A bouquet of dark pink roses may be a way of saying how much you appreciate the presence of that loved one in your life. The lighter shade of pink in roses may be a roundabout way of saying you admire the recipient for her grace, gentleness, sweetness and even the joy she brings to you life.

Red Roses.      

Fiery red is the color that depicts love, fire or heat and passion. Hence, a red rose being given to a lover is like saying ‘I love you” out loud. Apart from love, passion, heat, and even fire, a red rose can also symbolize beauty and perfection.

Roses Red and White in Color.     

Given in conjunction with each other, these two roses combine in one flower bouquet to mean unity and as one.

White Roses.    

The reason why the white rose is so often used for weddings, is that a white rose symbolizes happy love. This flower is great to send when you are not apologizing, but merely celebrating your love, hence its use in weddings.

Yellow Roses.  

Yellow evokes feelings of friendship or companionship and happiness. A yellow rose is often given to friends to represent joy and friendship. A yellow rose may also bring about the message of starting a new---the promise of a new beginning. Therefore, if you want to be friends with someone, let her know by giving her a yellow rose.

The use of flowers as symbols dates back to ancient civilizations

Every flower blossom holds a unique significance and interpretation.

The use of flowers as symbols dates back to ancient civilizations, and each flower has a meaning associated with it. The list includes some common flowers such as roses, daisies, and lilies, as well as some less familiar ones like hellebore and hemlock.

For instance, the rose is often associated with love and beauty, while the daisy represents innocence and candor. The lily symbolizes purity and majesty, and the violet represents modesty. The acacia flower is linked to pure and platonic love, while the amaranth signifies fidelity and constancy.

Each flower has its own distinct symbolism and meaning, which can be used to express feelings, emotions, and ideas in various contexts. This ancient floral vocabulary is still relevant today and continues to be used in literature, art, and other forms of expression.

Flower Name

Ancient Floral Vocabulary

Absinth

The Bitterness and Torments of Love

Acacia

Love, pure and platonic

Acanthus

Love of Fine Arts

Althea

Exquisite Sweetness

Amaranth

Fidelity and Constancy

Anemone

Abandonment

Angelica

Gentle Melancholy

Argentine

Ingenuity

Aster

Elegance

Balsam

Impatience

Basil

Poverty

Betony

Emotion and Surprise

Bindweed

Coquetry

Bluet

Clearness and Light

Box

Firmness and Stoicism

Bramble

Injustice and Envy

Burdock

Importunity

Buttercup

Sarcasm

Calendula

Anxiety

Camellia

Constancy and Steadfastness

Carrot

Good Character

Cinquefoil

Maternal Love

Colchicum

Bad Character

Cypress

Mourning and Grief

Dahlia

Sterile Abundance

Daisy (Easter)

Candor and Innocence

Dandelion

Oracle

Darnel

Vice

Digitalis

Work

Dittany

Discretion

Elder

Humility

Ephemeris

Transient Happiness

Everlasting

Constancy

Fennel

Merit

Fern

Confidence

Forget-me-not

Faithful Remembrance

Foxglove

Adulation

Fuchsia

Amiability

Fumitory

Hatred

Geranium

Folly

Hawthorn

Sweet Hope

Heliotrope

Eternal Love

Hellebore

Wit

Hemlock

Perfidy

Holly

Defense

Honeysuckle

Bond of Affection

Hyacinth

Amenity

Hydrangea

Coldness

Iris

Indifference

Ivy

Attachment

Jasmine

Amiability

Jonquil

Amorous Languor

Jujube-tree

Relief

Larkspur

Open Heart

Laurel

Victory and Glory

Lavender

Silence

Lilac

First Troubles of Love

Lily

Purity and Majesty

Maidenhair

Bond of Love

Marjoram

Consolation

Marvel of Peru

Flame of Love

Mallow

Maternal Tenderness

Mint

Wisdom and Virtue

Milfoil

Cure and Recovery

Moonwort

Bad Payment

Myrtle

Love

Narcissus

Self-esteem and Fatuity

Nettle

Cruelty

Olive

Peace

Orange-tree

Virginity, Generosity

Peony

Shame

Periwinkle

Unalterable Friendship

Pineapple

Perfection

Pink

Pure and Ardent Love

Poppy

Sleep

Privet

Youth

Rose

Beauty and Love

Rosemary

Power of Re-kindling extinct Energy

Rue

Fecundity of Fields

Sage

Esteem

Sensitive-plant

Modesty

Solanum

Prodigality

Spindle-tree

Ineffaceable Memory

Strawberry

Intoxication, Delight

Thyme

Spontaneous Emotion

Trefoil

Uncertainty

Tulip

Grandeur

Valerian

Readiness

Vervain

Pure Affection

Viburnum

Coolness

Violet

Modesty

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