Skip to main content

All About the Turkana People in the African Ilemi Triangle

About the African Turkana People of Africa


The Turkana people live on the Ilemi Triangle, a disputed land bordering South Sudan, Kenya and Ethiopia. Turkana People live in one of the most hostile places on Earth, where daytime temperatures reach 113 degrees Fahrenheit 45 degrees Celsius.

Turkana People in the Ilemi Triangle


Turkana People in the Ilemi Triangle


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture


The Turkana tribe originally came from the Karamojong region of northeastern Uganda. Turkana oral traditions purport that they arrived in Kenya while pursuing an unruly bull. The land they occupy is harsh and very dry. The Turkanas were, therefore, less affected by colonialism than other tribes because the British saw little value in their land.

Turkana tribe is part of the Nilotic tribes and constitutes the second largest pastoralist community in Kenya after the Maasai. The Turkana maintain their traditional way of life. They are notable as being very adaptable, living in harsh and inhospitable terrain in the Ilemi Triangle.

The Ilemi Triangle, at up to 5,405 square miles in area is larger than some African countries, and is at the point where the frontiers of Ethiopia, Kenya, and the Sudan meet. Its present economic value is as a seasonal grazing area to which five ethnic communities, the Turkana, Didinga, Toposa, Inyangatom and Merille can lay claim.

The Turkana men dye their hair with special colored soil, while the women adorn themselves with traditional jewelry and beaded necklaces. A woman's social status or class determines the quantity and style of jewelry she wears. From the point of view of a Turkana person, one glance at a woman is enough to know her standing in the society.

Some of the most beautifully crafted items from the Turkana are the bracelets and necklaces worn by the women. Turkana artisans also produce many other artistic items, especially weapons such as spears, clubs and knives. The Turkana also manifest special skills in metalwork, woodcarving, and stone carving.

As with all other pastoralist tribes in Kenya, livestock, especially cattle, are at the core of Turkana culture. The Turkana place such a high value on cattle that they often raid other tribes to acquire more animals. This may be seen as theft, but to the Turkana and other pastoralist tribes, it is a traditional custom. Cattle raids are common between Turkanas and their neighboring tribes, especially the Karamoja of Uganda, and the Pokot and Marakwet of Southern Kenya.

The Turkana people live a nomadic life, always moving from one place to another depending on the availability of pasture and water for their animals. Cattle are the main source of livelihood for the Turkana, especially in the rural areas. The livestock provide milk and meat and are also a source of wealth when sold for money. Fishing in Lake Turkana is another important source of income for those living close to the lake.

Polygamy is an acceptable way of life. A Turkana man can marry as many wives as he can afford to pay the bride price. Like the Luo tribe and the Teso, the Turkana tribe does not practice male circumcision. They also do not hold any special initiation rituals to mark the transition to manhood.



Getting to Know more about Africa


African Country Names Your Saying Wrong
What do Waist Beads Symbolize in Africa?
About African Healers and Witchdoctors
Hurricanes are Angry African Ancestors
Highest Temperature and Lowest Temperature in Africa
About African Night Running

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=
Be Social With Us

Our YouTube Page
Our Facebook Page
Our Instagram Page
Our Pinterest Page

Popular posts from this blog

Survival of the Fattest, obese Europeans starving Africa

Survival of the Fattest

Rich get richer Survival of the Fattest, obese Europeans starving Africa
Survival of the Fattest is a sculpture of a small starving African man, carrying Lady Justice, a huge obese European woman who is a symbol of the rich world. Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture
5-12-2016

Survival of the Fattest Meaning
The copper statue Survival of the Fattest by Jens Galschi√łt and Lars Calmar was created in 2002. The fat woman is holding a pair of scales as a symbol of justice however; she is closing her eyes so the justice. Galschiot symbolized the woman as being blind, refusing to see the obvious injustice.
For the rich people of the world the main issue in life is that of overeating while people in the third world are dying every day from hunger. 
The misery of imbalanced wealth distribution is creating floods of refugees. However the rich only want to preserve their privileges and take measures so harsh against the poor, they betray their morals …

South African Beef Curry Recipe

Perfect South African Apricot Beef Curry RecipeSouth African beef curry recipe is a South African food recipe to share around the world while learning about South Africa rainbow nation food history and favorite recipes of Black African, Colored mixed race ancestry, White, and Indian.

South African Beef Curry RecipeWhen it comes to quick and satisfying slow cooker crockpot meals South African Apricot Beef Curry recipe is at the top of the African food dinner recipe list. Use your slow cooker for this simple South African Apricot Beef Curry recipe, it is full of apricot jam, spices and tender beef to serve with rice and grilled bread. How to Make Perfect South African Apricot Beef Curry Recipe
Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture By Chic African Culture
African food recipe

South Africa food is one of the most diverse on the African continent. South African apricot beef curry is an easy delicious slow cooker dinner recipe to make on a weeknight.
South African Apricot Bee…

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa

Charging Cell Phones Rural Africa

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa

The simple task of charging a cell phone is no simple matter in rural African villages far from an electric grid.
With the advent of tiny rooftop solar panels electricity could be accessible to millions.
African governments are struggling to meet to electric needs of the poorest of the poor living in rural areas. 

Living off-grid may be a lifestyle choice to some and a fact of everyday living to the poorest of the poor. However, tiny rooftop solar panels and high-efficiency LED lights across the African continent could provide enough electricity to charge cell phones. 

Cell phones are vital for people in rural areas with no access to banks in order to send and receive money, access medical care and stay in contact with family and friends.
What does Off-Grid Mean? Off the grid (off-grid) means creating your own self-sufficient environment and being able to operate completely independently of all trad…