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Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Breasts in Africa

Breasts in Africa

Sexualisation of Breasts
Breasts in Africa; breasts are less eroticized in some rural African societies where women go topless than in urban societies where breasts are exploited in advertising and in pornography.

Mother breastfeeding her child

Female breasts wield amazing power in Western societies.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Curvy women have leveraged the power of their breasts to manipulate even the most able, self-controlled. Empires have fallen, wills revised, millions of magazines and bras sold, and Super Bowl audiences scandalized.


Breasts in the US are big business, because sex sells. We see women’s breasts everywhere on television, at the movies, in magazines, on billboards. The addictive and harmful nature of porn is likely another reason why women’s breasts have become sexualized.

According to the National Geographic Society’s official website, one of the magazine’s early milestones came when its publishers decided that from then on out, they would show native peoples as they were, including when photographed nude. In the case of November 1896, that month’s issue included a photograph of a topless Zulu bride and groom from South Africa.

The message conveyed is that nudity is not necessarily “pornographic” in nature, but that it has a legitimate, academic place when studying world cultures. The African culture knew breastfeeding is the best way to feed baby and breasts are for nourishing life, not giving pleasure.

Health extension worker Elsebeth Aklilu refers to a family health card while counselling Kedo Abdula, who is holding her 21-month-old daughter, Fenete Abdela, on best nutrition practices, at the health post in the village of Maderia, in Gemechis, a woreda (district) of Oromia Region.

One problem is other cultures see bare breasted African women as lacking modesty, that they are closer to animals, that they are loose and want sex all the time. However, in the 18th and 19th centuries, at the same time National Geographic displayed bare breasted African women for scientific cultural purposes, in the Victorian age there were and still are taboos and social stigmas against showing nakedness, including showing your ankles or wearing pants.

The images of bare chested African women were disgraceful to say the least and African women were seen as heathens and not real people. No breach of etiquette elucidates the point more than the Victorian taboo about female toplessness. A taboo persists to the present day.

In Africa, women were not taught to be ashamed of their bodies, ashamed of being naked. The African culture knew breastfeeding is the best way to feed baby and breasts are for nourishing life, not giving pleasure.


Breasts are less eroticized in most African societies where women go topless than in more industrialized societies where breasts are exploited in advertising and in pornography.
African moms breastfeeding children
Did you know?
The average woman's breasts have increased from a 34B in the 1960s to 36DD today.



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