Curiosity is the key to knowledge.

Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

Popular_Topics

The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Saturday, June 30, 2018

African Folktale Innocent Monkey and Lying Shark

African Folktale Innocent Monkey and Lying Shark

African Folklore short story of Innocent Monkey and Lying Shark was told to an ancestor whose ancestors told them to them, who had received the African folktale from their ancestors, and so back into African folklore storytelling history.



African folklore with animals offers valuable moral lessons. 


African Folktale Innocent Monkey and Lying Shark

African Folktale Innocent Monkey and Lying Shark



Once upon a time Bahati, the monkey, and, Aza the shark, became great friends.


The monkey lived in an immense mkooyoo tree which grew by the sea shore with half of its branches being over the water and half over the land.


Every morning, when the monkey was eating her breakfast of kooyoo nuts, the shark would put in an appearance under the tree and call out, “Throw me some food, my friend;” which the monkey fulfilled most willingly.


This continued for many months, until one day Aza said, “Bahati, you have done me many kindnesses: I would like you to go with me to my home, that I may repay you.”


“How can I go?” said the monkey; “we land beasts cannot go about in the water.”


“Don’t trouble yourself about that,” replied the shark; “I will carry you. Not a drop of water shall get to you.”


“Oh, all right, then,” said Bahati; “let’s go.”


When they had gone about halfway the shark stopped, and said: “You are my friend. I will tell you the truth.”


“What is there to tell?” asked the monkey, with surprise.


“Well, you see, the fact is that our king is very sick, and we have been told that the only medicine that will do him any good is a monkey’s heart.”

African Folktale Animal Folklore


“Well,” exclaimed Bahati, “you were very foolish not to tell me that before we started!”


“How so?” asked Aza.


But the monkey was busy thinking up some means of saving herself, and made no reply.


“Well?” said the shark, anxiously; “why don’t you speak?”


“Oh, I’ve nothing to say now. It’s too late. But if you had told me this before we started, I might have brought my heart with me.”


“What? Haven’t you your heart here?”


“Huh!” shouted Bahati; “don’t you know about us? When we go out we leave our hearts in the trees, and go about with only our bodies. But I see you don’t believe me. You think I’m scared. Come on; let’s go to your home, where you can kill me and search for my heart in vain.”


The shark did believe her, though, and exclaimed, “Oh, no; let’s go back and get your heart.”


“Indeed, no,” protested Bahati; “let us go on to your home.”


But the shark insisted that they should go back, get the heart, and start afresh.


At last, with great apparent reluctance, the monkey consented, grumbling sulkily at the unnecessary trouble she was being put to.


When they got back to the tree, she climbed up in a great hurry, calling out, “Wait there, Aza, my friend, while I get my heart, and we’ll start off properly next time.”


When she had got well up among the branches, she sat down and kept very still.


After waiting what he considered a reasonable length of time, the shark called, “Come along, Bahati!” But Bahati just kept still and said nothing.


In a little while he called again: “Oh, Bahati! Let’s be going.”


At this the monkey poked her head out from among the upper branches and asked, in great surprise, “Going? Where?”


“To my home, of course.”


“Are you mad?” yelled Bahati.


“Mad? Why, what do you mean?” cried Aza.
“What’s the matter with you?” said the monkey. “Do you take me for a fool?” Get out of there, and go home by yourself. You are not going to get me again, and our friendship is ended. Good-bye, Aza.”

Aza turned away and started swimming home with a heavy heart ashamed of deceiving a good friend who was trusting, generous and kind.


Share this page

Tuesday, June 26, 2018

Incredible Edible Breadfruit

Incredible Edible Breadfruit

Cooking with breadfruit sounds exotic because breadfruit does not look like your typical supermarket fruit. Breadfruit is cooked by baking, steaming, frying, dried and ground into flour.


Eating breadfruit

What is breadfruit


Breadfruits are edible large cantaloupe size fruit yellow green in color with hard starchy white flesh similar to a potato. Skin texture of breadfruit ranges from smooth to rough to spiny. 


It is easy to select breadfruit select a firm to the touch breadfruit creamy white or pale yellow inside. Cooking breadfruit is as easy as baking a potato. Baked breadfruit taste similar to potatoes and when making breadfruit treat breadfruit as you would a potato. 


Your new best cooking friend incredible edible breadfruit is rich in riboflavin, iron, niacin, thiamin, potassium, copper, magnesium, calcium, zinc, manganese, selenium and phosphorus.



Baked Breadfruit Recipe


Ingredients      
1 whole breadfruit, peeled and sliced into 12ths  
Salt, desired amount
¼ cup butter


Directions
Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Lightly oil a large sheet pan. 

Peel the breadfruit; remove the core, cut into 12 even wedges, place on baking sheet and brush with butter and sprinkle with salt. 

Baked 45 minutes or until breadfruit is tender. 

Sprinkle with more salt and brush with extra butter. Serve warm with steak and vegetables. 


Share this page

Thursday, June 21, 2018

African Proverbs for Students


African Proverbs for Students

African Proverbs for Students

Students and kids learn from African proverbs and meanings to smooth out the rough patches in school life. Through the proverbs of Africa quotes from African elders Africa provides the world wisdom.


Six African inspirational proverb quotes for students and kids.


Never give up: The tree does not fall at the first stroke.

Diligence: For the last-comer the bones.

Fearlessness: Not every dog that barks bites.

Friendship: The mouth is responsible for discord among people.

Ask for help: A good swimmer is not safe from drowning.

Inner beauty: A fine cage will not feed the bird.


Six African inspirational proverb quotes for students and kids

More African inspirational proverb quotes for everyone


You will then learn your measure, when you spend a night with yourself.


Look at a person’s deeds, not whether they are tall or short.


One can be kept well by a hundred, not a hundred by one.


Who dies inside has lost.


The load that the mule will not carry, you yourself should not carry.


Keep your head up African inspirational proverb quotes
Keep your head up African inspirational proverb quotes 


Although there are many roads, there is only one that is the straightest.


The thorn which is sharp is so from its youth.


A person’s values are not nullified by passing storms.


Who today is humiliated easily, tomorrow will be lost.


Fear and shame are father and son.


Until one dies, others will not be satisfied.


Share this page

Tuesday, June 19, 2018

African Folklore Short Story of Rice

Estimated read time minute
African Folklore Short Story of Rice

African Folklore Short Story of Rice



Mystifying legend of rice African folklore is a short story with a moral lesson of be happy with what you have. Why One Grain of Rice No Longer Feeds the Village is one of many short African folklore stories from Sierra Leone Africa.


White rice


Why One Grain of Rice No Longer Feeds the Village

Once one grain of rice covered well with water and cooked afforded a good meal for several persons. At that time the Supreme God, the ruler of all, had a wife from the people.


One day her numerous relations come to visit her. She decides that one grain in the pot will not suffice for so many, therefore she puts in plenty rice.


The Supreme God sees the pot boiling, and becomes very angry and says, “One grain would have sufficed to feed all the people but since you have broken my law, hereafter, to get enough to eat, everybody must put plenty rice in the pot."




Did you know?

African rice has been cultivated in Africa for over 3,500 years. Rice is consumed in large quantities and is part of a traditional diet in Sierra Leone.



Share this page

Saturday, June 16, 2018

Simple Couscous with Honey Recipe

Couscous is pasta, not rice. Couscous recipes are eaten throughout North Africa. The best way how to cook couscous is simple with honey and a few spices. When honey and couscous combine the benefit result is a tasty delightful dish of perfect North African couscous origin.



Simple Couscous with Honey Recipe
Simple Couscous with Honey Recipe


Couscous with Honey Recipe


Ingredients
2 cups low fat milk
2 tablespoons honey
3 teaspoons cinnamon
2 cups dry couscous


Directions
In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine the milk, honey and cinnamon. As soon as it comes to a boil, stir in the couscous. Turn off the heat, cover and let stand for 5 minutes. Serve warm.



Did you know?

Honey is the only food source produced by an insect that humans eat.


Honey is the only food source produced by an insect that humans eat.


Share this page

Saturday, June 9, 2018

Coconut Curried Shrimp

Tanzanian Coconut Curried Shrimp

Tanzanian Coconut Curried Shrimp


Best Coconut Curry Shrimp Recipe

Tanzanian coconut curried shrimp recipe is a simple African food dish. Curried coconut shrimp is the favorite African food dish of coastal Tanzania.


Tanzanian Coconut Curried Shrimp

Tanzanian Coconut Curried Shrimp
Tanzanian Coconut Curried Shrimp


Ingredients
1 pound cleaned shrimp
2 tablespoons good quality curry powder
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 yellow onion chopped finely
2 tablespoons of salted butter
2 medium white potatoes, finely diced
1/2 teaspoon ground paprika
1/2 tablespoon ground cumin
1 hot pepper, chopped
Salt to taste
2 cups coconut milk
1 cup vegetable stock


Directions
In a large saucepan brown over medium, heat butter, curry, onions, garlic, cumin and paprika. Add remaining ingredients except shrimp, cover tightly, and simmer until potatoes are soft 15 minutes. Add shrimp, cover simmer 5 minutes. 


Share this page

Thursday, June 7, 2018

Read Write English African Adult-Literacy Rates

Read and Write in English African Adult Literacy Rate

Read and Write in English


You are considered literite if you can read and write in English in Africa





African Adult-Literacy Rates


In this article, you will learn that the power is in the definition. October 2015 African adult literacy rates is calculated using African country populations aged 15 to 24 years who can both read and write in English with understanding a short simple statement about everyday life. Around 38% of African adults are illiterate; two-thirds of these are women by the read and write in American English literacy standard but this must be taken in context.


Keep in mind there are no universal definitions and standards of literacy therefore literacy rates in Africa are subjective. In addition, Africa is the second most populous continent with about 1.1 billion people or 16% of the world’s population. Mexico, China, Eastern and Western Europe, India, the USA and Japan can all fit into Africa's total land area very comfortably. 


Lastly, most importantly, over 25% all languages are spoken only in Africa with over 2,000 languages spoken on the continent. With such diversity in language, a person is counted as literate by the World Bank if you are aged 15 to 24 years who can both read and write in English with understanding a short simple statement about everyday life. Generally, literacy exams also encompass numeracy, the ability to make simple arithmetic calculations. Many African cannot read and write is a subjective statement since African adult literacy rates are skewed figures since literacy means you can read and write in American English in Africa. Literacy standard in Africa must be taken in context



Read Write English


African Adult Literacy Rate
Note:  Data is calculated using African country populations aged 15 to 24 years who can both read and write in American English with understanding a short simple statement about everyday life.
African Countries
Total %
read and write in English
Male %
read and write in English
Female %
read and write in English
Algeria
73
81
64
Angola
71
82
60
Benin
29
41
18
Botswana
87
87
88
Burkina Faso
29
37
22
Burundi
87
89
85
Cabo Verde
85
90
80
Cameroon
71
78
65
Central African Republic
37
51
24
Chad
38
47
29
Congo
79
86
73
Côte d'Ivoire
41
52
30
Democratic Republic of the Congo
75
88
63
Djibouti
-
-
-
Egypt
72
80
64
Equatorial Guinea
95
97
92
Eritrea
72
81
63
Ethiopia
39
49
29
Gabon
82
85
80
The Gambia
53
62
45
Ghana
71
78
65
Guinea
25
37
12
Guinea-Bissau
58
70
45
Guyana
85
82
87
Kenya
72
78
67
Lesotho
76
66
85
Liberia
43
61
27
Libya
90
96
84
Madagascar
64
67
62
Malawi
61
72
51
Mali
31
43
20
Mauritania
46
57
35
Mauritius
89
92
87
Morocco
67
76
58
Mozambique
51
67
36
Namibia
76
74
78
Niger
15
23
9
Nigeria
51
61
41
Rwanda
66
71
62
Sao Tome and Principe
70
80
60
Senegal
52
66
40
Seychelles
94
93
94
Sierra Leone
46
57
35
Somalia
-
-
-
South Africa
93
94
92
South Sudan
27
35
19
Sudan
74
82
66
Swaziland
83
84
82
Togo
60
74
48
Tunisia
79
87
71
Uganda
73
83
65
United Republic of Tanzania
68
75
61
Zambia
61
72
52
Zimbabwe
84
88
80


Read Write English


Share this page

Chic African Culture Featured Articles

Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

Wise Words


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.