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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Voices of Herbalists in Africa, Medicinal African Bush Tea Recipe

Voices of Herbalists in Africa, Medicinal African Bush Tea Recipe

Ancient Knowledge
Herbalism is one of the main methods used to treat various illnesses in traditional African medicine.

Medicinal African Bush Tea Recipe


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




The continent of Africa has a wealth of indigenous herbs and plants such as African bush tea used for herbal treatments.

Therapeutic African Bush Tea


African Recipes by

Therapeutic bush tea has a bitter flavor and is used for medicinal purposes to treat stomach problems.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:


Ingredients:


Desired amount of Rooibos (pronounced roy-bose) bush tea leaves
Boiling water
Honey or sugar optional


Directions:

When making herbal African bush tea use a tea strainer. The tea strainer eliminates the need to strain off leaves later. 

Add your desired amount of bush tea leaves to a tea strainer or teapot. 

Cover with boiling water a let steep for 2-5 minutes or until you have created your perfect cup of tea based on your preference. 


Hyptis suaveolens or bush tea is a wild plant whose leaves are used to make therapeutic herbal tea.


Did you know?
The word rooibos comes from the Afrikaans language meaning red bush.

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Friday, September 29, 2017

6 Reasons To Fear The Female Species in Africa

Aedes mosquito, the female of the species is more deadly than the male

Deadly Female Insects
Just how deadly is the deadliest insect in the world? Of all disease-transmitting insects, the mosquito is the greatest menace, spreading malaria, dengue and yellow fever, which together are responsible for several million deaths and hundreds of millions of cases every year.

A little boy from the Goba tribe receiving a dose of medicine in Lusaka, Zambia


The female Aedes aegypti mosquito is one of the deadliest animals in the world causing major diseases such as the West Nile Virus, Malaria, Yellow Fever, Chikungunya, Zika and Dengue.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Despite the emergence of some 29 new diseases in the last 20 years, there is still a lack of national and international political will and resources to develop and support the systems necessary to detect them and stop their spread. Without doubt, diseases as yet unknown but with the potential to be the malaria of tomorrow, lurk in the shadows.

Deadly Female Insects, Six Reasons To Fear The Female Species in Africa

Mosquitoes are one of the deadliest animals in the world. The Aedes aegypti or Aedes mosquito is jet black, with white spots on the upper torso and white rings on their legs. Aedes ability to carry and spread disease to humans causes millions of deaths every year. Aedes can breed in a teaspoon of water, and their eggs have been found in old tires, tin cans, plastic bottles, cesspools, catch basins, and ponds.

West Nile Virus

West Nile virus is mainly transmitted to people through the bites of infected mosquitoes. West Nile Virus (WNV) was first isolated in a woman in the West Nile district of Uganda in 1937. Human infection is most often the result of bites from infected mosquitoes. Mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds, which circulate the virus in their blood for a few days.

The virus eventually gets into the mosquito's salivary glands. During later blood meals (when mosquitoes bite), the virus may be injected into humans and animals, where it can multiply and possibly cause illness. Infection with WNV is either asymptomatic (no symptoms) in around 80% of infected people, or can lead to West Nile fever or severe West Nile disease. Vaccines are available for use in horses but not yet available for people. About 20% of people who become infected with WNV will develop West Nile fever.

Symptoms include fever, headache, tiredness, and body aches, nausea, vomiting, occasionally with a skin rash (on the trunk of the body) and swollen lymph glands. The symptoms of severe disease (also called neuroinvasive disease, such as West Nile encephalitis or meningitis or West Nile poliomyelitis) include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis. It is estimated that approximately 1 in 150 persons infected with the West Nile virus will develop a more severe form of disease.

Malaria is the third leading cause of death in Africa

Most malaria cases and deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, malaria is a life-threatening disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to people through the bites of infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. Some 13 countries in Africa account for 76% of malaria cases and 75% deaths globally. The people of sub-Saharan Africa can live in remote areas where access to healthcare is challenging due to lack of transportation, natural and physical barriers, and poverty.

Deeply-rutted mountainous dirt roads, thick with dust in the dry season and treacherously slippery in the half-yearly rainy season are difficult to navigate not only for people travelling by foot, but also for taxis, bicycles and mopeds with passengers perched precariously on the backs. In areas with high transmission of malaria, children under 5 are particularly susceptible to infection, illness and death; more than 70% of all malaria deaths occur in this age group. Between 2010 and 2015, the under-5 malaria death rate fell by 29% globally. However, malaria remains a major killer of children under five years old, taking the life of a child every two minutes.

The female Aedes aegypti mosquito is one of the deadliest animals in the world causing major diseases such as the West Nile Virus, Malaria, Yellow Fever, Chikungunya, Zika and Dengue.

Yellow Fever

Yellow fever is endemic in Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo in 2016, the first outbreak in 28 years. The last outbreak in the country occurred in 1988 with 37 cases and 14 deaths. Currently, with the blessing of The World Health Organization, most people in the infected areas receive ¼ of the yellow fever vaccine due to a worldwide shortage.

A single dose of yellow fever vaccine provides long-lasting protection and a booster dose of the vaccine is not needed however, ¼ dose of the vaccine provides protection for around 1 year. With yellow fever, after 3-6 days symptoms include fever, muscle pains, backache, headache, shivers, loss of appetite, nausea or vomiting. Roughly 15% of patients enter a second, more toxic phase within 24 hours. Symptoms of this phase may include high fever, jaundice, and abdominal pain with vomiting.

Bleeding can occur from the mouth, nose, eyes or stomach and blood appears in the vomit and feces, and kidney function may deteriorate. Half of the patients who enter the toxic phase die within 10-14 days, the rest recover without significant organ damage. The "yellow" in the name refers to the jaundice that affects some patients. The last yellow fever outbreak in Nigeria occurred 14 years ago, but it took 10 years to control the transmission of the virus in the population.

Chikungunya

Chikungunya is a viral disease transmitted to humans by infected mosquitoes. It causes fever and severe joint pain, muscle pain, headache, nausea, fatigue and rash. Joint pain is often debilitating. Most patients recover fully, but in some cases joint pain may persist. Serious complications are not common, but in older people, the disease can lead to arthritic pains of longer duration and may cause death.

A woman has a blood test at St Michaels Community Hospital, Magawe, Malawi

Zika

Zika Symptoms are usually mild and can include mild fever, skin rash, inflammation of the eyes, muscle and joint pain, melancholy and headache. Zika infection during pregnancy causes microcephaly, babies born with small heads, and other fetal brain malformations. Zika is also a cause of Guillain-Barré Syndrome - a neurological condition that can lead to paralysis and death. Zika virus was first identified in Uganda in 1947 in monkeys through a network that monitored yellow fever. It was later identified in humans in 1952 in Uganda and the United Republic of Tanzania. Outbreaks of Zika virus disease have been recorded in Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific.

Dengue

Dengue is endemic in more than 128 countries, with 3.9 billion people at risk. About half of the world's population is now at risk. Flu-like symptoms occur 4-10 days after the bite of an infected mosquito; high fever accompanied by severe headache, pain behind the eyes, muscle and joint pains, nausea, vomiting, swollen glands or rash. The disease can develop into severe dengue which is a leading cause of serious illness and death among children in some Asian and South American countries.


Did you know?
OX513A, the genetically engineered mosquito was first released into the world's population in 2010 and was celebrated as the answer to eliminating the Aedes mosquito.

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Thursday, September 28, 2017

Whole Nother Level of Understanding African Proverbs

Whole Nother Level of Understanding African Proverbs

Hard to understand
People say they want to read you, to understand you, to see a side of you no one else gets to see; but they never do because you're on a whole nother level of understanding.
Your uniqueness is so awesome!

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music"


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




The reason that you can sometimes be hard to understand is that we are all unique creatures.



Whole Nother Level of Understanding African Proverbs

We are not all the same and that is a good thing. Uniqueness, is self-evident, when you are different from everything else, your uniqueness obliterates all other cookie cutter personalities around you. Many people are bullied or harassed in life because of their uniqueness. The leader is always different, always first, always first place in the world of status quo panicky people and this makes them stand out because they are putting their thoughts on the line and opening to criticism and ridicule but being different means, you make a difference.


Conakry is the capital of Guinea, a country in West Africa and the Keita Fodeba Centre for Acrobatic Arts in Conakry, Guinea produces some of Africa's most talented acrobats and contortionists. 

Whole Nother Level of Understanding African Proverbs

We are not obliged to answer a village message.

The hen cannot lay eggs of crocodiles, and crocodiles cannot lay eggs of hens.

One who is bound to stray follows a defined path.

Eggs and stones should not dance with one another.

No matter how much a person changes goats will never lay eggs.

You should not sleep outside just because someone else did it and was lucky.

There is no king who is not gossiped about.

The lion does not turn around when a small dog barks.


Conakry is the capital of Guinea, a country in West Africa and the Keita Fodeba Centre for Acrobatic Arts in Conakry, Guinea produces some of Africa's most talented acrobats and contortionists. Did you know?
Conakry is the capital of Guinea, a country in West Africa and the Keita Fodeba Centre for Acrobatic Arts in Conakry, Guinea produces some of Africa's most talented acrobats and contortionists.

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Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Best Traditional African Herbal Medicines for People Living With HIV AIDS

Best Traditional African Herbal Medicines for People Living With HIV AIDS

Herbs can improve digestion, stimulate appetite, preserve foods.
Traditional African herbal medicines may help to treat many of the symptoms of opportunistic infections that are part of HIV AIDS.

Best Traditional African Herbal Medicines for People Living With HIV AIDS


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




A list of herbs and the beneficial effects by people living with HIV AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa are given in the table below.


HIV AIDS is not a traditional African illness and so far, there is no hard evidence to believe that traditional African medicines can treat HIV and cure AIDS. The effects may not be the same for all people. People can try these herbs and spices in moderation and decide for themselves whether they are helpful.

Remember that all herbs should be used in moderate amounts. Exceeding these amounts may cause problems and have a toxic effect; moreover, the function of the herbs and spices will not be increased if you take more than required. 

Herb
Benefits found by some people living with HIV AIDS
How to use
Aloe
Helps to relieve constipation
Use as extract; boil and drink the concentrated water. To be used in limited amounts; stop immediately if it causes cramps or diarrhea
Basil
Helps to relieve nausea and aid digestion; has an antiseptic function for mouth sores
Add to food to treat nausea and digestive problems. Use as gargle for mouth sores
Calendula
Flower heads have antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and healing function. Helps with infections of the upper digestive tract
Use as a compress to treat infected wounds. Prepare as tea to help digestion
Cardamom
Helps with digestive problems, pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting and loss of appetite
Add to food during cooking or prepare as tea
Cayenne
Stimulates appetite, helps fight infection, heals ulcers and intestinal inflammation
Add a pinch to cooked or raw foods. For an energizing drink add to fruit juice or water
Chamomile
Helps digestion and provides relief for nausea
Prepare tea from the leaves and flowers and drink several cups throughout the day
Cinnamon
Good for colds and for weakness after colds or flu. Also used when feeling cold, for diarrhea and nausea. Stimulates appetite. Gently stimulates digestive juices, encouraging bowel movements
Either add to meals or in tea, particularly ginger cinnamon tea for chesty colds or tuberculosis
Cloves
Stimulate appetite, help weak digestion, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting
Use in soups, stews, warmed fruit juice and tea
Coriander
Helps to increase appetite and reduce flatulence. Controls bacteria and fungi
Add herb to meals
Eucalyptus
Has an antibacterial function, particularly for lungs and during bronchitis. Eucalyptus oil from leaves increases the blood flow and reduces the symptoms of inflammation
Prepare tea from the leaves or extract
Fennel
Helps to increase appetite, combat flatulence and expel gas
Add as spice to foods or prepare tea from the seeds. Use in limited amounts
Garlic
Has antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal function, particularly in the gut, intestines, lungs and vagina. Helps digestion and feeling of weakness. Also good for thrush, throat infections, herpes and diarrhea
Prepare tea or energy drink , or use in food
Ginger
Improves digestion, energizes, relieves diarrhea and stimulates appetite. Used for treating common colds, flu and nausea
Use either as a spice in meals or prepare a ginger tea
Lemon
Is antibacterial and helps digestion
Add lemon juice to food or drinks
Lemon grass
Has a calming effect as well as soothing digestion and alleviating stress
Use as tea
Mint
Has an anti-inflammatory effect and helps digestion
Use as tea or gargle for mouth sores. Chew mint leaves to aid digestion
Neem
Brings down fever
Cut a fresh twig, remove the leaves and boil the bark in water; drink as tea. The bark can also be chewed
Parsley
Reduces intestinal colic. Stimulates stomach secretions and activities and produces a feeling of hunger. The seed is used to remove excess water from the body
Add raw or cooked to food
Peppermint
May help nausea. Reduces colic (abdominal pain and cramps), helps to control diarrhea and stop vomiting. Used for relieving tension and sleeplessness
Prepare as tea, by boiling the leaves for about ten minutes. Add to food. (Peppermint can easily be grown in the garden and or in a pot near the house)
Thyme
Has antiseptic and antifungal function. Relaxes nervous coughing and increases mucosal secretions. (particularly effective in the gut) Stimulates digestion and the growth of the good intestinal flora in the gut
Use as gargle or mouthwash,  or as tea
Turmeric
Digestive aid, antiseptic and antioxidant
Use powdered in rice, cereals, etc.
Aloe is cultivated for medicinal uses by African herbalists.

Aloe is cultivated for medicinal uses by African herbalists.


Did you know?
In Africa, 25.6 million people were living with HIV in 2016 and Africa also accounted for almost two thirds of the global total of new HIV infections.

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Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Brief History of Lesotho Seven Military Coups Since 1991

Lesotho political crisis of Military coups in History

Lesotho military coups
Since 1991, the African kingdom of Lesotho has been in political crisis withstanding seven military coups.
Since 1991, the African kingdom of Lesotho has been in political crisis with standing seven military coups.

Lesotho seven military coups from 1991-2017


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Military coups in Lesotho History.



January 15, 1986, General Justin Lekhanya, the Head of the Lesotho Army, ousted Lesotho Prime Minister Chief Leabua Jonathan in a military coup. Jonathan had been prime minister since 1966 and gained executive political control over Lesotho when the king's power was limited in 1970. Sixty members of the African National Congress (ANC) were deported from Lesotho to Zambia after the coup.

February 1990, a power struggle had developed between Lekhanya and King Moshoeshoe II and the king was forced to go into exile in the United Kingdom.

In April 1991, Lekhanya was removed from power in a military coup led by Colonel Elias Tutsoane Ramaema. Ramaema announced a schedule for Lesotho's return to democracy. All political parties were soon allowed to operate in the country and Moshoeshoe returned from exile in July 1992, though not as monarch, but as a tribal chief. Democracy was restored in 1993.

Lesotho soldier
Lesotho soldiers 
After weeks of unrest caused by allegations of fraud during general elections in May 1998, violent protests and a military mutiny following a contentious election prompted South African soldiers to operate on a shoot-to-kill policy to suppress continuing violent protests. South African President Nelson Mandela publicly endorsed the military intervention in Lesotho, saying it had been essential to end "chaos and anarchy".

In 2012, competitive elections involving 18 parties saw Prime Minister Motsoahae Thomas Thabane form a coalition government that ousted the 14-year incumbent, Pakalitha Mosisili.

An attempted military coup took place September 2013, Prime Minister Thomas Thabane said in an interview "In my political life, it was not the first time that I saw this kind of activity by the Lesotho army," Thabane said. A lot of effort has been made to reform the military and to "make it a normal army that is subject to the civilian authority." The Prime Minister said that since the Lesotho military was looking for him, he decided "to get out of the way," and fled to an unknown location.

Mosisili returned to power in February 2015 after the collapse of Thabane’s coalition government and an alleged attempted military coup.

On September 5, 2017, the head of Lesotho's army, Lt Gen Khoantle Motso-Motso, and two other senior officers were killed in a shootout at a barracks in the capital, Maseru when soldiers who were fired by Motso-Motso attempted to forcefully enter his office.
On September 5, 2017, the head of Lesotho's army, Lt Gen Khoantle Motso-Motso was killed
Lt Gen Khoantle Motso-Motso
These were the words of Deputy Prime Minister, Mr. Monyane Moleleki when describing the death of Commander, Lieutenant General Khoantle Motso-Motso,“Lesotho's flag has fallen as its bearer hits the ground with his knees, succumbing to his death, a betrayal by those closest to him, and the nation coming before God with bowed heads and heavy hearts.”

Mr. Moleleki said he wished for Motso-Motso death to be Lesotho's peace sacrifice but admitted that it looks like the Commander's death was planned well ahead of time, calling for all to accept that what is done is done. The Late Lieutenant General, Motso-Motso will be buried on Thursday at Ha Lesaoana in the Butha-Buthe district.


Did you know?
Military coup or coup d'état in French is when a group of people seize power in a country.

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Monday, September 25, 2017

Lies the Maiden Told African Folktale

Lies and Damn Lies the Maiden Told African Folktale

True friends never lie
If a friend can't trust you, if someone doesn't trust you, that means they are truly untrustworthy.
Women fish sellers in Fayoum, Egypt

Lies the Maiden Told African Folktale

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



What's it like to be friends with someone you know you can't trust?



Five maidens one day took their baskets and went to the river to fish. One of their numbers caught many fishes, while the other four caught none at all. And they said to their more fortunate friend: "Let us have a few of your fishes; you have so many, and we have none at all."

"No!" said she, "what I have caught I keep for myself.

And they all started for home.

They had gone quite a distance when the maiden who had caught the many fishes discovered, that she had lost her arm-ring charm.

And she asked her companions to go along back with her and help her find it.
"No!" said they. "Ask your fishes to go along with you. You know that we are your friends, yet you would not let us have a few fishes when we asked you!"

So the maiden went alone to the river.

There she met a Python. On seeing him, she became charmed by him and was unable to move from the spot. And the Python killed and devoured her.

Thus, this selfish maiden because of her lies not only lost all of her fishes, but her life as well.


The Maiden showed true selfishness being concerned only for herself regardless of her friends and she paid for her deceit with her life.


Five African Proverbs About Deceit and Selfishness













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Sunday, September 24, 2017

Apartheid Mass Murders And The White Apathy Effect

Apartheid Mass Murders And The White Apathy Effect

Queenstown South Africa, Apartheid killer rampage
Black South Africans were not allowed to live but only to work in the all white South African town of Queenstown and if you were lucky, you would not be murdered by a serial killer hired by the town to protect white life and white property.


Apartheid Mass Murders And The White Apathy Effect

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



Apartheid; blacks do not want equality, they want to be on top and that is unacceptable.



Queenstown is a town in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa. The town lies in an upper valley of the Great Kei River. It has a distinctive hexagonal shape, designed by its founder, Sir George Cathcart, as a precaution against attack. Queenstown was founded in 1853 intended to be a military outpost designed to protect the British subjects from attack during the time of the Frontier wars. The town was laid out around a central hexagon, which was to be the lager to which the citizens would flee in time of trouble.
 
Ezibeleni is the largest township in the Queenstown area. Its original name was Queensdale, named after Queenstown. Ezibeleni was a town established near Queenstown in the 1960s, the majority of the Black population was moved east to the township of Ezibeleni, as part of the removal of Africans to Bantustans, or homelands.
 
Ezibeleni was officially recognized in 1974, when as a part of Apartheid, black South Africans were not allowed to live, but only to work, in the white-dominated Queenstown. In order to pursue the policy of separate development, the apartheid-era government of the time dictated that, due to its location on the map and the predominant Xhosa ethnicity of its people, Ezibeleni would belong to Transkei, one of ten fragmented Bantustans, or homelands, scattered across South Africa. It was incorporated into Queenstown after 1984.

Queenstown resident Louis van Schoor is an Apartheid killer cop and hired to protect white-owned businesses in the 1980s, he is thought to have shot 101 people, killing 39, in a three-year killing spree of black Africans. It is believed some were burglars; others were passers-by dragged in from the street. All were black or colored, the term for those of mixed race.
 
The bench is empty but this young black woman in a Johannesburg railway station would be breaking the law if she sat on it.
South Africa 1982

Van Schoor’s Apartheid killer rampage was made possible by a white establishment that remained silent as his black victims piled up, many of them impoverished children such as Liefie Peters, 13, gunned down while hiding in the toilet. In 2004, van Schoor was released on parole after serving 12 years of his 20-year sentence in the East London, South African prison.

Apartheid in South Africa caused the lives of millions of black Africans to turn upside down inside out and they were subjected to unspeakable hardships. White Africans privileged by their white skins could lead comfortable lives by ignoring what was happening around them. The layer of unawareness was most noticeable in rural Afrikaans towns.

Van Schoor said, "I was doing my job - I was paid to protect property. Van Schoor was convicted of seven murders and two attempted murders. Upon his release in 2004, Van Schoor said he had found God and, when prompted, expressed sorrow to his victims' relatives. "I never apologized for what I did. I apologized for any hurt or pain that I caused through my actions during the course of my work."
On October 15, 2002, Van Schoor 23-year-old daughter, Sabrina Van Schoor began her own 25 year prison sentence for hiring a hitman Feza Mdutshane, to murder her mother, Beverly.

Until October 29, 2004, when her father was released from prison, they were serving time together in the coed Fort Glamorgan prison in East London South Africa. South Africa's worst mass murderer of black Africans Louis van Schoor, after his release attempted to gain custody his only grandchild, a mixed race baby conceived by Sabrina and a colored man.

The assassination attempts had twice failed on her mother until Van Schoor herself had stepped in and taken the assassin in her car to the home she shared with her mother. She had let him in, fetched her baby girl from her mother's bedroom and directed the assassin to "do his dirty business".

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Saturday, September 23, 2017

How To Turn Your African Potato Cake From Blah Into Fantastic

How To Turn Your African Potato Cake From Blah Into Fantastic

South African food
This is a traditional South African Apricot Potato Cake made from russet potatoes, mixed with fresh apricots and a mixture of spices.

Apricot South African Potato Cake


Apricot South African Potato Cake
African Recipes by

Apricot South African Potato Cake is a delicious rich cake that gets its moist texture from Irish potatoes, cream and butter. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients
4 large russet potatoes
1 cup fresh apricots, chopped
2 cups whole milk
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 cup cream
6 large eggs
1 cup sugar
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
4 cups plain bread crumbs

Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Peel and boil the potatoes then mash. Add cream, milk, salt and vanilla. Whip eggs with the sugar and blend slowly and uniformly into the potato mixture, add apricots. Butter an 8x8 baking dish, add 2 cups of breadcrumbs evenly and then add potato mixture. Cover with remaining bread crumbs and bake for 20 minutes.

Apricot South African Potato Cake


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Chic African Culture Featured Articles

Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

Wise Words


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.