Curiosity is the key to knowledge.

Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Sunday, April 30, 2017

Unmarried pregnant girls sent to die on Punishment Island

Akampene Island on Lake Bunyonyi is better known as Punishment Island was the final stop for ritually humiliated, abandoned unmarried pregnant girls.


Good girls gone bad in the eyes of the African village


Good Girls Gone Bad Akampene Island on Lake Bunyonyi is better known as Punishment Island
Good girls gone bad in the eyes of the African village
The Bakiga tribe "people of the mountains" lived around Punishment Island having arrived from Rwanda in the 17th and 18th centuries. Akampene or Punishment Island is little more than a 100 foot raised muddy platform that sticks out from the lake. Lake Bunyonyi off Uganda's south west coast has 29 Islands, with Akampene Island better known as Punishment Island being the most famous. 

Bakiga tribes people would ritually abandon unmarried pregnant girls on Punishment Island. The tiny island was a wasteland to leave pregnant girls to die since they were no longer of value to the family since an unmarried pregnant girl could not bring the family a bride price and was therefore useless.

The ritually humiliated unmarried pregnant girls would not arrive in a single canoe with their family; there would be a whole flotilla of scornful, taunting villagers to abandon the no longer profitable girl on Punishment Island.
Canoe filled with tears
The ritually humiliated unmarried pregnant girls would not arrive in a single canoe with their family; there would be a whole flotilla of scornful, taunting villagers to abandon the no longer profitable girl on Punishment Island. This ritual was used to ensure that the humiliating spectacle deterrent to other girls that they dare not bring shame and humiliation to the village.

Punishment Island was also used to frighten young girls to show what would happen to them if they became pregnant before marriage however, the most horrific part of being exiled to Punishment Island was not being abandoned with any food or water, it was attempting to swim back to the mainland. Many attempted to swim across Africa’s second deepest lake, Lake Bunyonyi against strong waves and infested waters but died in their attempts.

Akampene Island on Lake Bunyonyi is better known as Punishment Island, a place intended for ritually humiliated, abandoned unmarried pregnant girls.
Punishment Island today

Today, Punishment Island is one of the prominent tourist sites on Lake Bunyonyi because of its torrid history. The Island is being eroded by nature although a section of locals in Kabale District of Uganda believe the spirits of the girls that died there could be the reason for its slow destruction. The practice ended in the mid-twentieth century however; there are still survivors from Punishment Island alive today to tell their stories. 

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Saturday, April 29, 2017

Oyo African Pepper Sauce

Oyo African Pepper Sauce

African Hot Peppers by John Winkelman
African Recipes by

Oyo African Pepper Sauce is an all-purpose hot sauce recipe used to flavor meats, seafood, fritters and vegetable dishes.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:


Oyo African Pepper Sauce

Ingredients:     

2 minced any type of hot pepper     

3/4 cup olive oil

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1/4 cup apple cider vinegar

¼ teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon ground paprika

1 teaspoon ground cayenne

2 teaspoon ground habanero chili powder
 

Directions:

Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan over medium-high heat and cook 5 minutes. Pour sauce into prepared heat proof jars and use on meats, seafood, fritters, vegetable dishes, French fries etc...
African Hot Peppers by John Winkelman

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Thursday, April 27, 2017

Seven Mega Malls of Africa

Seven largest malls in Africa

Shopping in Africa
Despite having the 12th largest mall in the world, traditional markets are still the prevailing choice for shoppers across the African continent. However, seven super structures shatter the mold of what you think about luxury shopping in Africa.

Airport shopping in Johannesburg South Africa

Seven largest malls in Africa


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Seven largest malls in Africa in order are:


Mall of Arabia - Cairo, Egypt

Mega Malls of Africa, the largest mall in Africa is Mall of Arabia located in Cairo, Egypt
Mega Malls of Africa, the largest mall in Africa is
Mall of Arabia located in Cairo, Egypt
Built in the shape of a huge eye, the launch of Africa's largest shopping mall at 9.5 million sq ft, the Mall of Arabia Cairo opened in December of 2010. Mall of Arabia Cairo is located on the outskirts of Cairo featuring a large food court, dancing fountains along with upscale indoor shops and an outdoor market.


Morocco Mall - Casablanca, Morocco

Morocco Mall is the second largest shopping center in at 2.7 million sq ft and is located in Casablanca, Morocco.  Morocco Mall, which opened on December 1, 2011 featuring a 1 million liter aquarium called Aquadream which contains over 40 different species of fish. Visitors can go scuba diving with a professional instructor inside the aquarium.


Gateway Theatre of Shopping - Durban, South Africa

Gateway Theatre of Shopping in Durban South Africa at 2.4 million sq ft opened in September 2001 and has over 390 stores, 70 places to eat, a helipad, IMAX Theatre , Virgin Active Gym , Wavehouse waterpark , Outdoor Go-Karting , Skatepark , Concert Venue , Hotel and Road Lodge.


Cairo Festival City - New Cairo, Egypt

Cairo Festival City Mall is located in Almaza Al Qahirah Egypt. The Mall extends over 1.7 million sq ft spread on three levels, featuring over 300 shops, 95 restaurants and cafes, anchored by furniture flagship store IKEA, hypermarket Carrefour, and four department stores, Debenhams, H&M, Marks & Spencer and ZARA.
Canal Walk has over 400 stores and its very own television channel, CWTV with 2 giant screens and 32 plasma screens. The mall also has the unique Trading Post and Market Lane, which showcases the work of local retailers and craftsmen as well as views of Table Mountain and Robben Island.
Shopping for gifts


Stars Centre, Citystars Heliopolis - Cairo Egypt

Citystars Heliopolis has a total built up area of 8.1 thousand sq ft in the heart of Cairo and consists of Stars Centre, the largest shopping and entertainment center in Egypt. Citystars Heliopolis has over 750 stores over an area of 151,000 square meters.


Canal Walk - Cape Town, South Africa

Canal Walk has over 400 stores and its very own television channel, CWTV with 2 giant screens and 32 plasma screens. The mall also has the unique Trading Post and Market Lane, which showcases the work of local retailers and craftsmen as well as views of Table Mountain and Robben Island.  Canal Walk opened in 2000 and was built around a canal. It has a total retail area of 1.5 thousand sq ft.


Mall of Africa - South Africa, Midrand

Located in Waterfall City Midrand, Gauteng, Mall of Africa is South Africa's largest shopping Mall ever built in a single phase, with over 1.4 thousand sq ft of retail space, and is home to over 300 shops. Opened in April 2016, Mall of Africa architectural appearance is inspired by Africa’s geological features and iconic landscapes.


Mega Malls of Africa, the 7th largest mall is Stars Centre, Citystars Heliopolis in Cairo Egypt
Stars Centre, Citystars Heliopolis - Cairo Egypt
The Crystal Court is located in the Northern Section of the mall, representing Southern Africa's mineral wealth with sharp geometric patterns. The Great Lakes Court is located the Eastern Section of the mall, representing the Great Lakes mostly of East Africa and has calm and gentle materials used. 

The Desert Court is located in the Southern Section of the mall, representing the Sahara Desert of North Africa and has calm motifs used in traditional Berber carpets. The Oleum Court is located in the Western Section of the mall, representing West Africa's Oil wealth. The Forest Walk Court is in the center of the shopping mall, representing Central Africa and its rain forests.



Did you Know?
Some African currencies are stronger than others. Alongside Nigeria, South Africa boasts one of the continent’s strongest economies.

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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

African Clay Oil Lamp Tutorial

Clay oil lamps in Africa are used for utilitarian, ritualistic, and symbolic purposes.


Some of the earliest lamps were stones with depressions in which animal fats were likely burned as a source of light.
Clay oil lamp
In Africa for millions of years, people captured naturally occurring fire, tended it, and preserved it for long periods. A fire is important not only for warmth and for cooking, but for light. Currently, nearly 662 million Africans lack access to electricity. Throughout Africa, only 43% of urban and rural households have access to reliable electricity.

It is very hard to do anything once the daylight is gone. Some of the earliest lamps were stones with depressions in which animal fats were likely burned as a source of light. Shells, such as conch or oyster, were also used as lamps. Manufactured lamps are not always cost effective and readily available. Many households use simple molds or hand forming techniques to make clay lamps.

Clay Oil Lamp Tutorial


Materials:
• Waterproof air-dry clay, the amount depends on the size of your lamp
• 100% cotton fabric for wick, 4 inches wide, and the length depends on the size of your lamp
• Olive oil enough to fill the lamp
• Scissors

Directions:
Throughout Africa, only 43% of urban and rural households have access to reliable electricity.
Reading by candle light
Olive oil lamps are simple to make and nearly any shape can be used, as long as it holds oil without leaking or spilling and has a spout and a filling hole. Once your lamp is shaped to your liking, follow directions on the clay package to cure and harden it. 

The simplest shape is a saucer lamp. Raised edges hold the oil, and a single depression in the rim forms the wick spout. Cut a piece of cotton cloth 3/4” wide and the exact length depends on the size of your lamp. Braid or twist the cloth in a tightly spiraled wick. Fill the lamp with olive oil.

Insert the wick into the lamp’s spout positioning the wick so it extends from the bottom of the oil lamp to approximately 1/2” above the spout. Trim the excess if any with scissors. Be sure the wick is saturated with oil before lighting. Use your handmade clay lamp under adult supervision only. Oil lamps may set off smoke detectors.

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Sunday, April 23, 2017

Africa Flip Flop Pollution Problem

Flip flops found littered on beaches and in waterways of Kenya are made into works of African art.


Trash into treasure


Flip flops found littered on beaches and in waterways of Kenya are made in to works of African art
Elephant made from broken flip flops
Flip flops are one of the largest marine pollutants in the Indian Ocean and her beaches. Tons of broken and discarded flip flops wash up on East African coast each year. These flip flops were dumped in cities and villages and are carried away by sewage systems, rivers and other waterways into Kenyan coastlines every year. 

The union of ocean currents at the tip of the Lamu Archipelago drags thousands of flip flops washed away from beaches around the world onto the sea turtle nesting grounds. With driftwood and flip flops littering the beaches, female sea turtles struggle to reach nesting sites and hatchlings, already threatened by a variety of predators that lie between the nest site and the water's edge, often fail to reach the safety of the ocean when faced with piles of debris.

"Over three billion people can only afford flip flops," says Erin Smith of Ocean Sole, "They hang on to them, they fix them, they duct tape them, mend them and then usually discard them." "We are actually receivers of pretty much the world's marine pollution, an immense amount of the pollution that appears on East Africa beaches come from thrown away flip flops from Asia, India and China.”

Environmentally friendly way to dispose of flip-flops


Waterways in Africa are greatly polluted because of flip flops. They are one of the largest marine pollutants along Africas' East coast.Ocean Sole has a team of African artisans in Nairobi Kenya to design sculptures from discarded flip flops into crafty works of art and just as important, a source of income. The African artisans clean the rubber sandals and sort them according to their color. Next, they cut, mold and sand them as they turn the old flip-flops into their eye-catching creations.

Importing flip flops from recycling crews from Kenya including Kibera (Key-bear-a), Kenya’s Largest Slum, broken flip flops are made into animal creations such as the famous 18-foot life-sized giraffe. Artists convert the flip flops into sculptures, jewelry, key rings and other small gifts to sell in local tourist markets and to export around the world. These celebrated upcycled flip flop creations have even made their way into the hands of Pope Francis in 2015.
The waterways in Africa are greatly polluted because of flip flops
Collecting flip flops


According to Ocean Sole, "Thousands and thousands of flip flops are washed up onto the East African coast creating an environmental disaster. Discarded flip flops not only spoil the natural beauty of African beaches and oceans, the rubber soles are swallowed and suffocated on by fish and other marine life. Flip flops also obstruct turtle hatchlings from reaching the sea and are a man-made menace to Africa’s fragile ecosystems."

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Saturday, April 22, 2017

African Proverbs About Trust

African proverbs about trust represent the importance of respect and responsibility in relationships. Trust is the greatest and most important of all human virtues.



African Proverbs About Trust


The tracks of a leopard are not made by a dog  - African Proverb


African Proverbs About Trusting People
One who defames another's character, also defames their own -Nigerian Proverb


When you bite indiscriminately, you end up eating your own tail - Zulu Proverb


People may tell little lies small as a thorn but, they will grow to the size of a spear and kill you -Yoruba Proverb


You will know who you love; you cannot truly know who loves you - Nigerian Proverb


Almost doesn't fill a bowl - African Proverb

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Friday, April 21, 2017

African Fetish

Fetish figures throughout Africa are vessels of power that can control and influence things seen and unseen affecting destiny.


African Fetish 


A fetish is an object with perceived supernatural powers used to invoke vigilant and protective spirits to drive away evil spirits, invoke the power to afflict a person with a disease or attempt to control destiny. In Africa and throughout the world these beliefs are manifested in some of the most expressive and magical power figures ever created called fetishes.

Fetish figures throughout Africa are vessels of power that can control and influence things seen and unseen affecting destiny.
 Rafa African Fetish
Common to many tribes in Africa is the belief that the fetishes are powerful through their ritualistic carving and sanctification. Fetishes also are made of different special substances and offered sacrifices depending on the need of the person.

Fetishes are carved with the intention to be held in the hand or set upright in the ground during a ceremony in which songs, dances, invocations, divinations, and gifts are associated with fetish devotion.

The delicacy of feature and expression used in the carved wooden figures of human beings and animals are typical art forms used to make a fetish. Some fetishes have the heads or stomachs hollowed out to hold special materials. Among the materials added to the wood figures are horns, shells, nails, feathers, mirrors, metal, twine, paint, cloth, raffia, fur, beads and herbs; anything thought to add power to the fetish.

The word fetish is a Portuguese word feitiço meaning charm, sorcery. Nowadays fetish is used to denote a wide variety of magical and religious objects for mental or spiritual strength.

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Thursday, April 20, 2017

Kichalundu the Heaven Tree African Folktale

Kichalundu the Heaven Tree is an African Folktale teaching the beauty of life from death.



Kichalundu the Heaven Tree


Kichalundu the Heaven Tree is an African Folktale teaching the beauty of life from death.
 Kichalundu 
Kichalundu went out one day to harvest vegetables from her garden, finding the gourd patch growing very luxuriantly; she stepped on the lushest spot and sank quickly into the soil. Franticly her friends took hold of her hands and tried to pull her out, but in vain; she vanished from their sight.

They heard her crying, "The ghosts have taken me. Go and tell my father and mother," and they ran to call the parents. The whole countryside gathered about the place, and a spiritualist advised the father to sacrifice a cow and a sheep. This was done, and they heard the girl's voice again, but growing fainter and fainter, until at last, it was silent, and they gave her up for lost.


But, after a time a tree grew up on the spot where she had disappeared. It went on growing, until at last it reached the sky. The herd-boys, during, the heat of the day, used to drive their cattle into its shade, and themselves climbed up into the spreading branches. One day two of them ventured higher than the rest, and called out, "Can you see us still?" The others answered, "No! Do come down again!" but the two adventurous boys refused saying, "We are going on into the sky to see Kichalundu in the world above" Those were their last words, for they were never seen again.


Kichalundu the Heaven Tree is an African Folktale teaching the beauty of life from death.
 Kichalundu the Heaven Tree African Folktale


African Folktale

African Folktales three facts

African folktales usually have sly animals and spirits as the main characters.

Anansi is one of the most beloved African folktale characters. He often takes the shape of a spider and is considered to be the spirit of all knowledge of stories.

Reading African folktales will help kids make connections to their cultural heritage.



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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Anti-Vaccine Movement in South Sudan

The anti-vaccine movement in South Sudan, Africa, is by force, not choice. Measles is one of the leading causes of death among young children even though a safe and cost-effective vaccine is available.



Measles in South Sudan


Measles outbreak Africa mothers wait to vaccinate their babies
Measles outbreak Africa
mothers wait to vaccinate their babies
South Sudan is being wracked by severe humanitarian health emergencies. The destruction of health facilities and displacement of health workers have stretched an already vulnerable health system to breaking point. Despite being preventable, measles is still common in many parts of South Sudan Africa.

Measles is an extremely infectious disease caused by the rubeola virus. In 1980, before widespread vaccination, measles caused an estimated 2.6 million deaths each year worldwide. Measles starts with fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and sore throat followed by a rash that spreads over the entire body.

In February 2014, WHO categorized South Sudan’s health crisis as a “Grade 3” – the highest level of humanitarian emergency. More than 3500 cases, and 170 deaths were reported in 2015. Almost all were recorded in displaced people’s camps or refugee camps. Measles is one of the leading causes of death among young children throughout Africa even though a safe and cost-effective vaccine is available.

"South Sudan is a challenging work environment because of insecurity and a limited ability to access some of the country’s most vulnerable people," said Dr Abdulmumini Usman, WHO Representative to South Sudan.

Almost all Measles cases were recorded in displaced people’s camps or refugee camps in South Sudan 2015
Almost all Measles cases were recorded
in displaced people’s camps or refugee camps
in South Sudan 2015.
Most measles-related deaths are caused by complications associated with the disease. Complications are more common in children under the age of 5, or adults over the age of 20. The most serious complications include blindness, encephalitis (an infection that causes brain swelling), severe diarrhea and related dehydration, ear infections, or severe respiratory infections such as pneumonia. 

Severe measles is more likely among poorly nourished young children, especially those with insufficient vitamin A, or whose immune systems have been weakened by HIV/AIDS or other diseases.

In the U.S., many parents started refusing to vaccinate their children from the measles and decide to raise their children without vaccines. In 2015 officials in 14 states grappled to contain a spreading measles outbreak that began near California’s Disneyland. The anti-vaccine movement can largely be traced to a 1998 report in a medical journal that suggested a link between vaccines and autism but was later proved fraudulent and retracted.

Throughout South Sudan, infectious diseases such as measles pose a major public health challenge and cause significant levels of illness, disability and death for a country also caught in conflict. The country’s weak public health systems aggravate the situation to effectively respond to largely preventable disease outbreaks. Frequent disease outbreaks are driven by multiple factors, including conflict leading to displacement of people and overcrowding and poor environmental conditions.

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Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Egyptian Goddess Sothis Bringer of the Nile Flood

Sothis the goddess was called the bringer of the New Year and the Nile flood. 


Sopdet, or Sothis, for the ancient Egyptians is a very important star that signaled the coming annual inundation of the Nile River that marked the beginning of the new agricultural year.
Nile River
Sopdet, or Sothis, for the ancient Egyptians is a very important star that signaled the coming annual inundation of the Nile River that marked the beginning of the new agricultural year. Its bright appearance in the morning sky announced the annual flooding of the Nile.

Sothis is known as the goddess who is the bringer of the New Year and the Nile flood.  The Nile is the longest river in the world. Its main branch, called the White Nile, flows north from Lake Victoria in east-central Africa 3,470 miles to the Mediterranean Sea on Egypt’s northern border. 

Starting in Ethiopia, another river, called the Blue Nile, joins the White Nile at Khartoum, Sudan, where the rivers merge and flow into Egypt. The Nile is the heart and life of the Egyptians. Although Egypt was enormous, most of the population lived near the banks of the river.

Pyramid Text Utterance 442:822 states, “Your third is Sothis of the pure places, she is your leader by the beautiful ways in heaven, in the Marsh of Reeds.”


Pyramid Text Utterance 477:965 states "It is Sothis, thy daughter, who loves thee, who secures thy livelihood, in this her name, who conducts N., when N. comes to thee."
Sothis daughter of Osiris
It was the Nile River swollen by heavy rains that caused the river to rise and each year the Nile overflowed its banks, depositing fresh, rich topsoil on the flat plains that spread to either side of the river and enabling Egypt to grow an abundance of crops.

Erstwhile ancient civilizations had to rely on their unpredictable rainfall to water crops, and often there was too much or too little. Egypt’s great fortune was to have a river that renewed the topsoil annually and flowed in sufficient volume to water the fields.

Pyramid Text Utterance 442:965 describes Sothis as the daughter of Osiris. Therefore, Sopdet became associated with the prosperity resulting from the fertile silt left by the receding waters. Sothis is almost always shown as a woman wearing a tall crown similar to the White Crown of Upper Egypt but with tall, upswept horns at the sides and surmounted by a star with five points.

Pyramid Text Utterance 477:965 states "It is Sothis, thy daughter, who loves thee, who secures thy livelihood, in this her name, who conducts N., when N. comes to thee."


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Sunday, April 16, 2017

Why Some Souls Are White and Others Black

Black purifies with waters which are fit for sacrifice, pure, and divine. Why Some Souls Are White and Others Black is a West Africa Republic of the Congo African Folktale.



Why Some Souls Are White and Others Black


It was in the beginning, and four men were walking through the woods and came upon two rivers. One river was of water, clear as crystal and of great clarity; the other was murky, frightful, and horrifying to the taste.

In many religious, philosophical and mythological traditions, the soul is the incorporeal essence of a living being.
Black purifies
The four men were puzzled as to which river they should cross; for, whereas the dirty river seemed very difficult to pass, the clear river was easier to cross. 

The men, after some discussion, thought that they should cross the black river, and two of them at once crossed it.

The other two, however, barely touched the black water and returned to the edge of the woods.

The two men that had crossed the river called to their two companions urging them to cross, but in vain. They had already determined to leave their companions, and to cross the clear white river.

However, after they crossed, they were surprised to find that they had become black; the two who had crossed the black river, however, were a white color.

The two parties now travelled in different directions, and this is why some souls are white and some black.


Black purifies the body, mind and soul
African Folktale moral of the story


African Folktale

African Folktales three facts

African folktales usually have sly animals and spirits as the main characters.

Anansi is one of the most beloved African folktale characters. He often takes the shape of a spider and is considered to be the spirit of all knowledge of stories.

Reading African folktales will help kids make connections to their cultural heritage.



Share this page

Saturday, April 15, 2017

Ȯ dị otó It was delicious | African Street Food

African Street Food

Ȯ dị otó translates to it was delicious in the African Igbo language. Street food is an important part of the culture and economy throughout the African continent.

Town market in Dosso, Niger.

An estimated 2.5 billion people worldwide consume street food each day many of whom are poor and cannot afford food from retail stores depend on food that street vendors provide. 

Street food vending employs, on average, more than 42 percent of the labor force and contributes about 41 percent of the total GNP in Africa. Street food vendors in Africa are commonly family or one-person businesses and the majority work without licensing.

Some people want a sit down meal, but most are street vendors wandering through food markets weaving in and out of traffic. Street food vendors can be found near offices, factories, schools, markets, construction sites, beaches, truck, train, plane and bus stations, business centers and along almost every street in Africa. 

Setting up a street food business needs little investment and requires no special training other than the domestic experience in preparing food.



Selection of fruits at the Park market in NigeriaIn Accra, Ghana, it is estimated that food vendors employ around 70,000 people and has an annual turnover of US$105 million, with annual profits in the order of US$26 million. With the rise of urban businesses and growing urban populations demand for ready to eat affordable food is increasing. 

In many large cities ready to eat food is a necessity for many as they have little time for food preparation while at work or do not have the time to travel back home for their meals. Buyers most often see street and snack food as home cooked food.

Micro-gardener food vendor Accra, Ghana. Small scale farmers and micro-gardeners especially women in Africa, find making street foods from crops harvested in their gardens to be an excellent way to increase income. Women commonly cultivate and look after home gardens. 

These gardens not only provide a source of food for their families, but also can be made in larger quantities and marketed to the public. Home gardeners can also furnish street food vendors directly to city dwellers as well as supply ingredients generated from farm produce to other street and snack vendors. 

Certain snacks like bean cakes, roasted cassava and groundnuts, oilseeds and grain legumes are commonly sold as snack foods in Africa.


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Thursday, April 13, 2017

Southern Africa Mushroom Dombolo Dumplings Recipe

Mushroom harvesting occurs in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands and Mpumalanga, the fresh mushrooms collected are being served at the best restaurants around Southern Africa.



In Southern Africa, the white button and brown mushrooms are mainly grown. Africans prefer their mushrooms fresh rather than being processed into canned product. Mushroom Dombolo or Mushroom Dumplings is a favorite Southern African recipe using fresh white button mushrooms.


Southern Africa Mushroom Dombolo Dumplings Recipe


Ingredients:
Southern Africa Mushroom Dombolo Dumplings Recipe
Southern Africa Mushroom Dombolo Dumplings Recipe
Filling
5 cups chopped button mushrooms
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 small onion, minced
Salt and ground black pepper to taste
Dough
1 large egg yolk
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
3 ¼ cups all-purpose flour, more as needed

Directions:
Mushroom filling
In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring often, until golden but not brown, about 5 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring, until mushrooms have released their liquid, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle with salt and pepper and drain liquid. In a food processor, pulse mushroom mixture until finely ground.

Dombolo dough
In a small bowl, combine egg yolk, oil and 1 1/2 cups lukewarm water and whisk 1 minute. Place flour in a large bowl and make a well in center. Add a third of the egg mixture and lightly mix in with fingers or a fork. Repeat 2 more times. Using hands, fold dough together until soft: if crumbly, gently work in more water; if sticky, add flour. Transfer to a lightly floured board and knead 3 minutes. Form into a ball, transfer to a bowl and refrigerate 45 minutes.

Lightly flour a work surface and a pan or board for the finished dumplings. Divide dough into 3 sections. Using a well-floured rolling pin, roll each section out until very thin and in a rough rectangle. Use pastry cutter to cut circles.


Drain any excess liquid from mushroom filling. Place 1/2 teaspoon filling in center of each circle, seal by pinching the two sides together. Repeat with remaining dough and filling. In a large pot of salted boiling water, cook dumplings until they float, 2 to 4 minutes. Drain and serve in your favorite soup or stew.

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Chic African Culture Featured Articles

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.
Be the good

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

Wise Words


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.