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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Nkpulu Nigerian Toasted Cashews Recipe

Nkpulu Nigerian Toasted Cashews Recipe


African Recipes by

Nigeria is one of the largest cashew producers on the African continent. Nkpulu Nigerian toasted cashews recipe is an easy to make African recipe. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients
1 cup unsalted cashew nuts
1 tablespoon palm oil or vegetable oil
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon red pepper flakes - optional

Directions

Add oil to heated frying pan and remaining ingredients mix well and lightly toast. Serve as a snack.


African street food vendor selling cashew nuts in Nigeria
Did you know...?
Africa is the center of the cashew world, producing well over 40 percent of the world's cashew nuts.

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Thursday, February 23, 2017

Five I’m That Chick African Proverbs

What are the qualities of a real woman? I'm That Chick African Proverbs teaches us what are the fascinating characteristics of highly desirable women.


5 I’m That Chick African Proverbs

There are many colorful flowers on the path of life, but the prettiest have the sharpest thorns. - African Proverb
I'm That Chick African Proverbs
He who loves the vase loves also what is inside. - African Proverb
I'm That Chick African Proverbs
The words of an intelligent woman do not lock all the doors; they leave the right door open.
I'm That Chick African Proverbs
Eggs cannot teach a hen. - African Proverb
I'm That Chick African Proverbs
If you don't know how deep the river is, don't step in. - African Proverb
I'm That Chick African Proverbs

I'm That Chick African Proverbs


There are many colorful flowers on the path of life, but the prettiest have the sharpest thorns. - African Proverb

He who loves the vase loves also what is inside. - African Proverb

The words of an intelligent woman do not lock all the doors; they leave the right door open. - African Proverb

Eggs cannot teach a hen. - African Proverb

If you don't know how deep the river is, don't step in. - African Proverb

African Proverbs
African Proverbs

Teach us in everyday life African proverbs inspire with ancient words of wisdom.

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Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Bad Sister African Folklore Story

Mushonga the Bad Sister is a popular South African Folklore story of brutal jealousy and obsession that ends in the horrific murders of three innocent brothers.



Bad Sister African Folklore Story


Mushonga was the only daughter of Lightning and Rain. One day, Lightning’s three sons from another marriage came to visit their baby sister for the first time in 15 years.  Mushonga did not know her three brothers though the township people said, "Do not you see they are your brothers?" Mushonga was jealous she was no longer her father’s center of attention and decided to kill her three brothers that very night.

Mushonga the Bad Sister is a popular South African Folklore story of brutal jealousy and obsession that ends in the horrific murders of three innocent brothers.
Poor jealous Mushonga
The three brothers had, however, a Guinea fowl who watched over them their entire journey to their father’s house. Mushonga begged her boyfriend and his four brothers to help her in her murderous plans and they agreed. However, when the men crept near, in order to kill Mushonga’s brothers, the Guinea fowl made loud screeching noises warning of danger.

The murderous men attempted to sneak up on the three brothers a second time but were once again scared off by the Guinea fowl’s loud noises. They gave up their plans but Mushonga would not since she was determined to be the center of her father’s world.

Mushonga then stole again upon them. The Guinea fowl made a noise, but broke the rope by which it had been fastened, and ran into the desert. She then killed her brothers. When the Guinea fowl came near home it wept aloud, "Mushonga has killed her brothers! Alas! She has killed her brothers!"

Rain heard the Guinea fowl crying, and said to her husband—

"Do not you hear what the bird weeps for?

Lightning turned to his wife with tears in his eyes and said, "Come wife and turn yourself into a mighty thunderstorm, and I will become fire." They transformed themselves and when they came near the house where their sons had been killed, they combined and became a thunderstorm of fire and rain, and destroyed Mushonga boyfriend’s house and all his brothers killing everyone inside.


But because of her murderous jealousy, the worst punishment was saved for Mushonga who was cursed with the spell of living forever and was banished from the village forever tormented to wander the desert alone and loveless.

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Saturday, February 18, 2017

Conflict-Minerals Africa

Conflict-Minerals Africa

Conflict-Minerals 3TG
Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank-Act; disclosing the use of the conflict-minerals or 3TG, tantalum, tin, gold and tungsten in Africa.

Conflict-Minerals Africa


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Conflict-minerals have fueled and continue to help fund and sustain armed violence in Africa. Companies that are required to file a Conflict-Minerals Report must exercise due diligence on the source and chain of custody of their conflict minerals.

What is Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act?


There has been a leak of a proposed executive order from Donald Trump on the temporary 2-year repeal Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act disclosing the use of conflict minerals.


Conflict-Minerals funding war in Africa
Funding war in Africa
In 2010, Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Act, which directs the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to issue rules requiring certain companies to disclose their use of conflict minerals if those minerals are “necessary to the functionality or production of a product” manufactured by those companies. Under the Act, those minerals include tantalum, tin, gold or tungsten.


Congress enacted Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Act because of concerns that the exploitation and trade of conflict minerals by Militia and corrupt businesspersons is helping to finance conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and its neighbors by contributing to war and human misery of millions.

Conflict Minerals Report


Conflict-minerals
Conflict-minerals
Conflict Mineral as defined in the Dodd-Frank Act, Section 1502(e)(4) means: (A) columbite-tantalite (coltan), cassiterite, gold, wolframite, or their derivatives; or (B) any other mineral or its derivatives determined by the Secretary of State to be financing conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo or an adjoining country. 


Under Section 1502, a company that uses conflict minerals is required to conduct a reasonable country of origin inquiry that must be performed in good faith and be reasonably designed to determine whether any of its minerals originated in the covered countries or are from scrap or recycled sources.


Companies that are required to file a Conflict Minerals Report must exercise due diligence on the source and chain of custody of their conflict minerals.


Responsible Sourcing of 3TG


According to Apple's 2015 Conflict Minerals Report released March 2016, Apple has all smelters and refiners in Apple’s supply chain participating in a Third Party Audit program. 


Third Party Audits typically involve an examination of individual purchasing transactions on a sample basis to assess the reasonableness and effectiveness of conflict mineral sourcing practices at the particular smelter or refiner. Apple principally supports the work of the Conflict Free Sourcing Initiative or CFSI.
Materials used to make cell phone have a direct  influence on human rights in Africa
Materials used to make cell phone have a direct
influence on human rights in Africa


Apple states in 2016,” it focused its attention to two key areas: enhancing due diligence in the gold supply chain and helping improve local incident reporting and issue resolution.  


Apple plans to continue to review in detail credible reports of incidents in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and neighboring countries that may potentially connect to Apple’s supply chain and confirm the transparent reporting and resolution of any incidents related to armed groups where these incidents may reasonably relate to its supply chain.”


Additionally, Apple stated it intends to further its efforts to drive smelters and refiners to comply with Third Party Audits, and Apple will continue to remove from its supply chain those smelters or refiners that do not comply, the ultimate objective is protecting human rights in the African Region.



Did you know?
3TG is a sign commonly used for four minerals; 3TG is Tungsten, Tantalum, Tin, and Gold. The 3T's stand for Tungsten, Tantalum, Tin and the “G” stands for gold. 3TG are the most common conflict minerals.

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West African Garri Fritters Recipe

West African Garri Fritters Recipe

Garri Recipe

Garri is a popular West African food made from cassava flour and fried until golden brown served with delicious African soups and stews.


West African Garri Fritters Recipe

West African Garri Fritters Recipe
African recipes by African Gourmet  

Golden brown Garri Fritters are a favorite recipe of Western Africa made with ground cassava flour and spices fried into delicious snacks.

Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
By
African food recipe


West African Garri Fritters Recipe


Ingredients
2 cups cassava flour
1/2 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
1 tablespoon white sugar
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 - 1/3 cups water
1-2 cups oil for frying

Directions
In a large frying pan heat vegetable oil. Add all ingredients, mix well and form small fritters, fry until golden brown about 3 minutes on each side. Sprinkle with extra salt or curry powder before serving.

West African Fritters Recipe

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Thursday, February 16, 2017

Cheap Eats, Good Friend’s and African Happy Hour

Cheap Eats, Good Friend’s and African Happy Hour

Cheap Eats, Good Friend’s African Happy Hour in Nigeria’s capital city of Lagos.


Grilled Chicken Wings at African Happy Hour Suya Joints


African Happy Hour Suya Joints



Suya Spots in Africa three facts
  1. Suya is a street food that defies ethnic and racial boundaries.
  2. Suya sellers create delicious street food from the flames of charcoal grills.
  3. Suya spots are Lagos equivalent to happy hour.


Mai Suya, often referred to as Mallam are people who make their living by selling roasted Suya, a spicy skewered meat that is a popular delicacy among many African ethnic groups. However, Suya is a street food that defies ethnic and racial boundaries, as even non-locals enjoy it as much as locals. 

Nigeria’s capital city of Lagos generates about a quarter of Nigeria's total gross domestic product; this is due to impart of the local entrepreneurs, the Suya seller.
Mai Suya, often referred to as Mallam are people who make their living by selling roasted Suya, a spicy skewered meat that is a popular delicacy among many African ethnic groups.
Cheap eats, good friends African happy hour 

One of the most prominent ethnic groups in Northern Nigeria, the Hausa tribe traditionally prepares Suya. Suya sellers create delicious street food from the flames of charcoal grills. 

The Mai Suya enticing grill smoke along with the smell of spices and cooking meat arouses the taste of Lagos elite class and anyone around. Suya stands are a popular roadside snack for commuters, motorists and passers-by, every evening at open markets and malls.

One reason why Suya spots in Lagos are so popular is after a hard day of work, workers seek out relaxation places such as Suya spots or bars to unwind. Suya spots are Lagos equivalent to happy hour where friends and coworkers relax with drinks and suya.

Suya typically costs around 200 naira or .63 cents US for a stick and can be made with grilled chicken, beef, fish bits of kidney, liver and gizzard, and sometimes goat meat, depending on the demand of the clients in the locality.

Suya is generally made with skewered beef, fish or chicken. The meat is rubbed-in with a dry spice mix containing groundnut powder, cayenne pepper, ginger, paprika and onion powder. It is often served with spices, sliced onions, tomatoes, cabbages and other vegetables.


Homemade African Suya Meat Rub Recipe


Ingredients
Suya typically costs around 200 naira or .63 cents US for a stick and can be made with grilled chicken, beef, fish bits of kidney, liver and gizzard, and sometimes goat meat
Suya
1 cup roasted peanuts
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
2 teaspoons cayenne pepper
1 bouillon cube crushed
¼ teaspoon ginger

Directions
Add all spices to a coffee grinder and grind carefully taking care not to over process the mixture or it will turn into peanut butter. 

The texture should resemble fine breadcrumbs. Rub spice mix on uncooked meat, rest for 15 minutes and grill as usual. Store unused portions in an airtight container or keep in the freezer in a sealable plastic bag.


Did you know?

Lagos is the largest city in Nigeria, as well as on the African continent and is one of the fastest growing cities in the world.


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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Kuli Kuli African Fusion Snack Recipe

Kuli Kuli African Fusion Snack Recipe

High protein
Kuli Kuli African Fusion groundnut snack recipe.

Kuli Kuli is a popular snack of the Hausa people in northern Cameroon, Nigeria and Ghana.

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture


Kuli Kuli is made from roasted groundnuts ground into a rough paste mixed with sweet and savory spices and deep-fried.


Ingredients:
1 cup roasted Bambara groundnuts or peanuts
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground paprika
¼ teaspoon salt
Peanut oil for grinding


Directions:
Grind nuts and spices in a food processor adding enough oil to make a rough paste. Shape the peanut paste into balls. Roll Kuli Kuli in coconut flakes or chocolate chips for an African Fusion twist. Serve as a snack.


Did you know?
Roll Kuli Kuli in coconut flakes or chocolate chips for an African Fusion twist. Serve as a snack.
African fusion kuli kuli
Groundnuts and peanuts are used interchangeably but are not the same. 

The name groundnut generally refers to the peanut even though the Bambara variety was cultivated in West Africa hundreds of years before the peanuts introduction.

Bambara groundnuts taste like chickpeas with a very mild flavor.

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Fear of Losing African Culture

Fear of Losing African Culture

Losing African Cultures

African Cultures are losing traditions and rituals. African rich cultural traditions attract attention worldwide. African Cultures are losing traditions and rituals and this should teach us each African culture is a unique answer to the question of what it means to be human.

Arican rich cultural traditions attract attention worldwide

Fear of Losing African Culture


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture


Indigenous African cultures have been disappearing, taking valuable knowledge with them.

Borana People of Ethiopia and Kenya say
Wan oketen inqamne moqan infud’u.
The ladle cannot serve anything if the pot is empty. - English

Meaning - Africa is experiencing a rapid loss of indigenous cultural identity. Elders from across Africa try to teach by example cultural heritage through conversations that are reflective, respectful and constructive problem talk to the youth of Africa.

However, the youth must be receptive to learning. Building an atmosphere of trust and respect is key in establishing a culture of learning in which learning conversations can take place between old and young.

Within a trusting and supportive environment culture as practice is respected. Africa, 79 critically endangered, 66 severely endangered, 44 vulnerable, 51 definitely endangered languages; the current era of globalization has a melting pot effect on traditional African cultures.



African Cultures are losing traditions and rituals


The current era of globalization is having a melting pot influence on indigenous African cultures. While this may promote the integration of societies and has provided millions of people with new opportunities, it also brings with it a loss of uniqueness of indigenous African cultures, which in turn can lead to loss of identity and even self-conflict. This is especially true for traditional African societies, which are exposed to rapid modernization.

Zulu womanLanguage is a part of culture; nearly half of the 7,000 languages spoken in the world are expected to vanish in the next 100 years. In Africa, over 2,000 are spoken on the continent and hundreds are endangered or critically endangered. The extinction of a language results in the irrecoverable loss of unique cultural knowledge embodied in it for centuries. Deep in our hearts, we all understand that the quality of our lives depends, to a great extent, on our being able to take part in, and benefit from our culture. The current era of globalization is having a melting pot influence on indigenous African cultures.


In 2013, Kenya began a campaign toward the Maasai of educating the tribe on the negative connotations of ear stretching and upper cartilage piercing. Some Kenyan officials believe tribalism is hurting Kenya and the more mainstream an individual is the more likely they can absorb into conventional society.

The Samburu are extremely dependent on their animals for survival. On November 11, 2011, thousands of the Samburu livestock were impounded due to a dispute over land ownership with Nature Conservancy and the African Wildlife Foundation who purchased the land and gave it as a gift to Kenya for a national park, to be called Laikipia National Park. The Samburu's legal case was heard in the town of Nyeri December 14, 2011 and the court ruled The Kenya Wildlife Service had secured legal registration of the land.

Did you know?
Dinka tribeCultures are rooted in a time and place they define how people relate to nature and their physical environment, to the earth and to the cosmos, and they express our attitudes to and beliefs in other forms of life, both animal and plant. The losing of African culture also brings with it a loss of uniqueness of indigenous African cultures, which in turn can lead to loss of identity and even self-conflict.

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Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Walk softly on a big stick African folktale story

Walk softly on a big stick African folktale story

Walk softly on a big stick African folktale story


The African folktale is a story passed down verbally from generation to generation. Today African folktales are written down in books, blogs and still shared verbally.



African Folktale; walk softly on a big stick teaches everything was impossible until someone decided otherwise.

 

African Folktale; Walk Softly on the Big stick mongoose teaches everything was impossible until someone decided otherwise.
Walk Softly on a Big stick mongoose 

Walk Softly on a Big Stick African Folktale Story


Once the King of the hippopotamus’ got a stick long enough to reach across the ocean to the big island of Madagascar. 

He placed the stick into the water, and gave notice to all other animals that he who would cross over to Madagascar on that stick and bring back from there a leaf should marry his daughter.

One after another attempted to cross; lions, tigers, wild dogs, baboons, and even monkeys; but none could walk far before the stick would roll over and they fell into the water drowned.


By and by, the mongoose walked softly upon the stick, crossed over to Madagascar, and brought back a leaf, which he gave to the hippopotamus, and he in return gave him his daughter, as was promised.



African Folktale Story


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Sunday, February 12, 2017

African Billionaires

African Billionaires

Africa's Youngest Billionaires


Africa's number of billionaires is increasing.

Two youngest African billionaires are Mohammed Dewji, 41 and Isabel dos Santos, 43.


Africa currently has many African billionaires; Mohammed Dewji is ranked 16th and is the youngest at age 41, his current net worth is 1.4 billion. Isabel dos Santos is ranked 8th with a net worth of 3.2 billion at age 43. 





African Billionaire Mohammed Dewji


African billionaire Tanzania’s richest man and Africa’s 31st richest man Mohammed "Mo" Gulamabbas Dewji

African billionaire Tanzania’s richest man and Africa’s 31st richest man


Name: Mohammed "Mo" Gulamabbas Dewji

Net Worth: $1.4 Billion

Age: 41

Source of Wealth: Diversified

Residence: Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Citizenship: Tanzania

Marital Status: Married

Children: 3

Most Memorable Quote: “Every good and bad experience in life will teach you something. Choosing how to learn from your past shapes who you are today”

Tanzania's only African billionaire Mohammed "Mo" Gulamabbas Dewji is a Tanzanian businessperson, humanitarian, and former politician. Dewji retired from Tanzania's parliament in early 2015 after completing two terms. He is the CEO of METL, a Tanzanian conglomerate founded by his father in the 1970s.  METL span's 31 industries in 11 countries, including businesses in agriculture, manufacturing, consumer goods, finance, mobile telephony, real estate, oil and logistics.

Coca-Cola has been in Africa for 88 years, "We're taking on Coca Cola with our own brand called Mo Cola. We're fighting Red Bull with Mo Energy Drink, and like they have Fanta - we have our own brands," said Dewji in an interview with CNNMoney March 2016. 

Dewji won the 2014 African Philanthropist of the Year award.


African Billionaire Isabel dos Santos

Africa's richest woman African billionaire Isabel dos Santos.

African billionaire and Africa's richest woman


Name: Isabel dos Santos

Net Worth: 3.1 Billion

Age: 43

Source of Wealth: Investments

Residence: Luanda, Angola

Citizenship: Angola

Marital Status: Married

Children: 3

Most Memorable Quote:  “I work all the time. Seven days a week”

Isabel Dos Santos is Africa's only female African billionaire. She is the oldest daughter of Angola's longtime president. President Jose Eduardo dos Santos has been in power since 1979, and is Africa's second-longest serving head of state after Equatorial Guinea's Teodoro Obiang.

Isabel dos Santos owns a 25% stake in Unitel, Angola’s first private mobile phone operator, 42% of a bank, Banco BIC and is a major shareholder in several other large companies in Angola and Portugal. In October 2015, four members of the European Parliament publicly called for an investigation into her investments in Portugal.

Angola is Africa’s top oil producer; June 2016, her father appointed her the head of Sonangol, Angola's state oil firm. Despite the scandal of nepotism, African billionaire dos Santos in December 2016 stated her intention to remain with Sonangol oil even after her father retires as Angola’s President after the 37-year rule in 2018.


Isabel dos Santos says Sonangol will be split into three separate units; exploration and production, logistics and a division that handles Sonangol’s concessions to international oil companies. In November 2015, the BBC named Isabel dos Santos as one of the 100 most influential women in the world.


A billionaire is someone who has more than a billion dollars $1,000,000,000 in the form of property, possessions, or dollars, pounds, or other monetary units.

Did you know

A billionaire is someone who has more than a billion dollars $1,000,000,000 in the form of property, possessions, or dollars, pounds, or other monetary units.

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Saturday, February 11, 2017

How to Prepare Chicken Feet

How to prepare chicken feet

How to prepare chicken feet


Chicken Feet Recipe

How to eat chicken feet 

Sauteed Chicken Feet​ Recipe

Lesotho Sepaile Sauteed Chicken Feet With Wild Mustard Greens

Injera Bread
African recipes by African Gourmet


How to prepare chicken feet the best way is African food recipe Lesotho Sepaile. Wild mustard leaves have a unique flavor of sharp mustard greens and sauteed with chicken feet simmered into a delicious and easy chicken feet African food recipe.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:
   


Ingredients

4 cleaned and prepared chicken feet cut in two

4 handfuls chopped mustard greens

1 medium onion, chopped

1 tomato, chopped

1 teaspoon salt

¼ cup water

1 teaspoon olive oil


Directions
Add chicken feet, water and onions to a large pan with oil and cook 20 minutes over medium heat. Add remaining ingredients and sauté chicken feet 10 minutes longer. Serve warm over rice.


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Chic African Culture Featured Articles

Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

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A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.