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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Spicy West African Goat Egusi Stew

Spicy West African Goat Egusi Stew is a hearty, savory slow cooker stew with potatoes, egusi seeds, tomatoes, herbs and spices.


Spicy West African Goat Egusi Stew is a easy African recipe one-pot meal to make for a family dinner.


Spicy West African Goat Egusi Stew is a hearty, savory slow cooker stew with potatoes, egusi seeds, tomatoes, herbs and spices.

Spicy West African Goat Egusi Stew



African recipes by Chic African Culture

Savory and wholesome egusi seeds are used to season and thicken African soups and stews. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients:

2 large pieces any smoked fish

2 large handfuls sorrel leaves or spinach

1 pound cubed goat meat

½ cup ground egusi seeds

2 large tomatoes, chopped

2 medium white potatoes, diced

1 large onion, chopped

2 cloves garlic, chopped

2 tablespoons palm oil or butter

1 teaspoon curry powder

1 hot pepper, chopped

5 cups vegetable stock or water


Directions:

Heat palm oil over medium heat in a large pot, add onions and garlic. Add remaining ingredients except egusi, fish and sorrel or spinach. Cover and cook for 2 hours, stirring occasionally, until goat is tender. Add egusi and fish stir, simmer 10 minutes longer. Finally add sorrel or spinach simmer 2-3 minutes serve over fufu or rice.

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Thursday, January 26, 2017

Black Coffee Born and Brewed in Ethiopia

Black Coffee Born and Brewed in Ethiopia

Black Coffee
Black coffee and the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange; coffee is Ethiopia most important industry. Coffee was born and brewed in Ethiopia for hundreds of years.

Berries from the Ethiopian Coffea plant

Black Coffee Born and Brewed in Ethiopia


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




You Should Drink Black Coffee

Berries from the Ethiopian Coffea plant and growing Ethiopian coffee


Black coffee and the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange; coffee is Ethiopia's most important industry. Coffee was born and brewed in Ethiopia for hundreds of years.
Black Coffee
The coffee cherry normally contains two beans (its seeds), which are flat on one side and develop in the center of the fruit with the flat sides facing each other. When only one bean is produced in the fruit, it is round and called a peaberry. In rare instances, three beans develop that are roughly triangular in shape.

Once the coffee berries turn bright red on the trees, farmers must pick them within two days or they will dry. After the cherry is picked, it begins losing moisture. If the cherry is sold by weight and it is not delivered quickly, then weight and therefore dollars are lost. The beans are also losing weight due to physiological respiration. The rate of weight loss is greatest during the fermentation process, when from around 4% of the weight of green coffee is lost.

Once plucked, the farmers have 12 hours to get the ripened cherries to a pulpery, or coffee washing station. Farmers in distant villages far from a washing station must sundry the beans themselves, then take off the husks and transport them to market.

Processing Ethiopian coffee


The Ethiopia Commodity Exchange (ECX) is a commodities exchange established April 2008 in Ethiopia
The world loves coffee
There are two distinct processing methods for coffee, dry and wet. The dry method is used in which the coffee beans are dried whole without pulping. The beans are spread evenly over the drying area and turned over periodically. The use of mechanical dryers is becoming increasingly popular. The beans can be placed in the dryer right after washing. Overheating ruins the quality of the coffee.

Coffee is processed only to the parchment-coffee stage on most small Ethiopian coffee farms and plantations. The parchment coffee is then sold to a larger plantation or to a miller who mills the coffee. Large farms frequently do all their processing, including roasting. Coffee is frequently polished to remove all the silver skin and give the coffee a more attractive, smooth, shiny appearance.

The wet method involves the removal of the pulp, fermentation of the thick, gluey material covering the parchment skin, rinsing, and then drying. Most countries producing mild coffee use the wet method. All exported coffee, washed and sun-dried, goes up for sale through the Ethiopian Commodity Exchange.

Ethiopian Coffee Commodity Exchange


The Ethiopia Commodity Exchange (ECX) is a commodities exchange established April 2008 in Ethiopia trading 90% in coffee and sesame seeds. Within a year, it became the main route for coffee exports in the continent’s largest producer of the beans after the state decreed traders must sell to exporters at the stock exchange.

There are two distinct processing methods for coffee, dry and wet.
Coffee beans
ECX creator Gabre-Madhin won the Yara award at the African Green Revolution Forum in Arusha, Tanzania, for her role in transforming Ethiopia's commodity market. Eleni Zaude Gabre-Madhin is an Ethiopian economist and a former Chief Executive Officer of the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange.


Ethiopia is where the coffee plants Coffea Arabica, Canephora and Liberica originates. The African country, Ethiopia manufactures the for the most part the most distinctive and captivating coffees on the plant. Ethiopia is the world's fifth largest producer of coffee, provides employment for nearly 15 million people, and makes up some 28% of the country's yearly exports. Coffee has a long and revered history in Ethiopia and is an important component of Ethiopian culture and society.

Where did Coffee come from?

Legend has it that coffee was accidentally discovered by Kaldi, a goat herder who lived in Ethiopia. One day, Kaldi observed his herd of goats chewing on red cherries from a tree he had never noticed before, after which they became energized. After trying them himself, Kaldi brought the cherries to a local monastery, where the monks tossed them in the fire as they disapproved of the idea of using the strange fruit. Instead of burning the beans, it actually roasted them. Those roasted beans were used to create the first coffee.

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Sunday, January 22, 2017

Say Yes To African Cape Malay Chicken Curry Supermarket Meal Recipe

Say Yes To African Cape Malay Chicken Curry Supermarket Meal Recipe

African Supermarket Meal, Cape Malay Chicken Curry Recipe
Yes everything you need for Cape Malay Chicken Curry Recipe is found in your local supermarket. Popular among South Africa Malay people are dishes such as chicken curry. Stews, roasts and baked vegetables form part of the Malay cuisine and the food is very spicy.

Among South Africa Cape Malay food recipes, Cape Malay Chicken Curry Recipe is a classic.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Say Yes To African Cape Malay Chicken Curry Supermarket Meal Recipe


In South Africa, the United East India Company, (Vereenigde Oost-Indische Compagnie or VOC) colonized portions of Southeast Asia, mainly Malaysia and Indonesia and practiced slavery in the South African Cape.

Those people that opposed the colonization and occupation of their lands by the Dutch in Asia were taken as political prisoners or shipped to exile at the Cape of Good Hope as slaves. The ex-imprisoned people today are known as Cape Malay.

Cape Malay Chicken Curry Recipe

Ingredients:
6 bone-in chicken thighs
African Supermarket Meal Cape Malay Chicken Curry Recipe
Cape Malay Chicken Curry
2 tablespoons sunflower oil
2 large tomatoes, diced
1 large onion, finely chopped
2 large white potatoes, diced
4 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 tablespoons ground ginger
¼ teaspoon ground cloves
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
1 ground white pepper
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground cardamom
1 cinnamon stick, snapped in half
1 large hot chili pepper, diced
2 tablespoons mango jelly
3 cups water or coconut water


Directions:
Heat the oil in a large, wide pan. Add the onion and fry for five minutes until softened. Stir in spices. Add vegetables, stir then add chicken, cover and cook for 30 to 40 minutes until the chicken is tender. Serve over rice.
Bizmellah a Cape Malay restaurant in South Africa
Bizmellah a Cape Malay
restaurant in South Africa

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Friday, January 20, 2017

List of Largest Ethnic Groups in Africa

List of the largest ethnic group in each African Country.



 An ethnic group is a category of people who belonging to or deriving from the cultural, religious, or linguistic traditions of a people or country. People who identify with each other based on similarities, such as common ancestral, language, social, and cultural experiences.

Some believe belonging to an ethnic group does not come from individual choice but others impose ethnicity. Race is associated with biology, whereas ethnicity is associated with culture. Therefore, ethnic group is a subjective category based on personal feelings, tastes, or opinions of others. 

Race is associated with biology, whereas ethnicity is associated with culture.
Learning at a refugee camp in East Africa

Largest Ethnic Groups in every African Country

2006-2016 CIA census reports




African Country
Largest Ethnic Group
Algeria
Arab-Berber 99%
Angola
Ovimbundu 37%
Benin
Fon and related 38.4%
Botswana
Setswana 79%
Burkina Faso
Mossi 52.5%
Burundi
Hutu 85%
Cameroon
Cameroon Highlanders 31%
Cabo Verde
Creole mulatto 71%
Central African Republic
Baya 33%
Chad
Sara 25.9%
Comoros
Antalote, Cafre, Makoa, Oimatsaha, Sakalava (Comoros’ population is a mixture of Arabs, Persians, Indonesians, Africans, and Indians)
Democratic Republic of the Congo
Over 200 African ethnic groups of which the majority are Bantu; the four largest tribes - Mongo, Luba, Kongo (all Bantu), and the Mangbetu-Azande (Hamitic) make up about 45% of the population
Republic of the Congo
Kongo 48%
Cote d'Ivoire
Akan 32.1%
Djibouti
Somali 60%
Egypt
Egyptian 99.6%
Equatorial Guinea
Fang 85.7%
Eritrea
Tigrinya 55%
Ethiopia
Oromo 34.4%
Gabon
Fang 32%
The Gambia
Mandinka/Jahanka 33.8%
Ghana
Akan 47.5%
Guinea
Fulani (Peul) 33.9%
Guinea-Bissau
Fulani 28.5%
Kenya
Kikuyu 22%
Lesotho
Sotho 99.7%
Liberia
Kpelle 20.3%
Libya
Berber and Arab 97%
Madagascar
Merina 26%
Malawi
Chewa 32.6%
Mali
Bambara 34.1%
Mauritania
Black Moors 40%
Mauritius
Creole 86.5%
Morocco
Arab-Berber 99%
Mozambique
Ethnic groups are not broken down in percentages however, the country is 99.66% African. The main ethnic groups in Mozambique are Makhuwa, Tsonga, Makonde, Shangaan, Shona, Sena, Ndau, and other indigenous groups.
Namibia
Ovambo 50%
Niger
Hausa 53.1%
Nigeria
Hausa and Fulani 29%
Rwanda
Hutu 84%
Sao Tome and Principe
Mestico or mixed-blood, descendants of Portuguese colonists and African slaves figures vary from 33%-68%
Senegal
Wolof 38.7%
Seychelles
Mixed French, African, Indian, Chinese, and Arab. Seychelles has no indigenous population and was first permanently settled by a small group of French planters, African slaves, and South Indians in 1770.
Sierra Leone
Temne 35%
Somalia
Somali 85%
South Africa
Zulu 21 %
South Sudan
Dinka 35.8%
Sudan
Sudanese Arab 70%
Swaziland
Swazi 84.3%
Tanzania
Bantu 95%
Togo
Ewe figures vary from 21%-32%
Tunisia
Arab 98%
Uganda
Baganda 16.5%
Zambia
Bemba 21%
Zimbabwe
Shona 82%


Some believe belonging to an ethnic group does not come from individual choice but others impose ethnicity.



Did you know?
Throughout the world, ethnicity is used as a social measure of differences between groups of people.

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