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Sunday, December 4, 2016

No Good Deed Goes Unpunished African Folklore Story

The African folktale story, Kodo and the Snake teaches us that no good deed goes unpunished. Helpful deeds are often unappreciated.


African Folklore Story

Kodo and the Snake, No Good Deed Goes Unpunished



Kodo was walking by himself, and saw a Snake lying under a large stone. The Snake implored his help; but when she had become free, she said, "Now I shall kill you."
No Good Deed Goes Unpunished African Folklore
No Good Deed Goes Unpunished African Folklore Story

Kodo answered, "That is not right. Let us first go to the Hare."

When the Hare had heard the affair, he said, "It is right."

"No," said Kodo, "let us ask the Hyena."

The Hyena declared the same, saying, "It is right."

"Now let us at last ask the Jackal," said Kodo in his despair.

The Jackal answered very slowly and considerately, doubting the whole affair, and demanding to see first the place, and whether Kodo was able to lift the stone.

The Snake lay down, and Kodo, to prove the truth of his account, put the stone again over her.

When she was pinned under the stone once more, the Jackal said to Kodo, "Now let her stay there."


African Folktale

African Folktales three facts

African folktales usually have sly animals and spirits as the main characters.

Anansi is one of the most beloved African folktale characters. He often takes the shape of a spider and is considered to be the spirit of all knowledge of stories.

Reading African folktales will help kids make connections to their cultural heritage.

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