Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture

If you like honey, fear not the bees. -African Proverb

Saturday, July 30, 2016

Clean Eating is a Lifestyle

What is clean eating? Clean eating is not a diet fad; it is a lifestyle of eating food in its most natural state; Tour of Africa has 15 planting a home garden safety tips for clean eating. Follow Africa's clean eating example by choosing natural foods as often as possible, foods grown and eaten from your home garden.



Home gardening has always been an important source of food for African rural and urban individuals and families.

Clean Eating and Home Gardening


Home gardening as well as clean eating is nothing new to Africans; it has always been a way of life growing a traditional home garden of leafy vegetables, tubers and herbs grown in simple containers or small pots. Home gardening has always been an important source of food for African rural and urban individuals and families.

More often than not, when we are clean eating, we eat fresh fruit and vegetables raw so we cannot rely on the heat of cooking to destroy pathogens that might be on our produce, it is important to prepare raw produce with food safety in mind.


15 planting a home garden safety tips for clean eating


Traditional seed storage bin in Africa. It is estimated that 80% of all seed used by farmers in the tropics is derived from stocks held on-farm from previous seasons.
Traditional seed storage bin in Africa. 
1. Locate vegetable gardens away from manure piles, well caps, garbage cans, septic systems and areas where wildlife, farm animals, or the family pets roam.

2. Be very familiar with the quality and safety of the water source you use in your garden.  

3. Do not feed wild animals, even birds, near your garden.

4. Do not use any animal waste, including pet waste, meat scraps or dairy product waste into your compost bin.

5. Use clean gloves that have not been used to stir compost or pull weeds or clean hands when picking produce.

6. Use clean, food-grade containers to collect food. Food-grade containers are made from materials designed specifically to safely hold food. Garbage bags, trash cans, and any containers that originally held chemicals such as household cleaners or pesticides are not food-grade.

Clean Eating and picking beans in Ethiopia, green beans are very easy to grow.
Clean Eating and picking beans in Ethiopia
7. Brush, shake or rub off any excess garden soil or debris before bringing produce into the kitchen.

8. If you choose to wash fruits and vegetables before storing, be sure to dry them thoroughly with a clean paper towel. However, never wash berries until you are ready to eat them.

9. Store unwashed produce in plastic bags or containers.

10. Keep fruit and vegetable bins clean.

11. Rinse fresh fruits and vegetables even if you do not plan to eat the skin or rind.

12. When washing produce fresh from the warm outdoors, the rinse water should not be more than 10 degrees colder than the produce. If you are washing refrigerated produce, use cold water.

Home gardening as well as clean eating is nothing new to Africans; it has always been a way of life
Home gardening as well as clean
eating is nothing new to Africans
13. Never use soap, detergent, or bleach solution to wash fresh fruits or vegetables. These solutions can affect flavor and may not be safe to ingest.

14. Fruits and vegetables needing refrigeration can be stored at 40° F or less.

15. Fruits and vegetables stored at room temperature, onions, potatoes, tomatoes, should be in a cool, dry, pest-free, well-ventilated area separate from household chemicals.




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