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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Throwing Mud African Proverb

People Like To Remind You of Your Mistakes

When someone uses your past against you and enjoys reminding you of your past mistakes, all trust is lost and you cannot tell anything personal to anyone because you feel they will throw it all back in your face.



What happened in the past is used to gain power and control over you by blaming and shaming you. Throwing Mud African Igbo Proverb teaches you cannot throw mud and stay clean.




He who will hold another down in the mud must stay in the mud to keep him down - African Igbo Proverb



Let go of the past and people who remind you of your past



Every day grants a chance to create ourselves afresh to shake off the past, open up to the present moment without being reminded of the past to create an extraordinary future. Accept your history and remember that it does not define you. 

Acceptance is the first step to letting go and setting yourself free.  Believe in yourself. Believe in your purpose.  Understand. Take time to reflect on your own history as a third party looking in without judgment: simply observe. Understand that you are not your past. 

Understand that situations and patterns in your life created your experiences they did not create you. Consciously and actively, work at letting go of your story; your judgments and ideals.




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Sunday, May 29, 2016

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa

Charging Cell Phones Rural Africa

Charging Cell Phones in Rural Africa

The simple task of charging a cell phone is no simple matter in rural African villages far from an electric grid.


With the advent of tiny rooftop solar panels electricity could be accessible to millions.
The simple task of charging a cell phone is no simple matter in rural African villages far from an electric grid.
Mobile phone charging business in Uganda Africa

African governments are struggling to meet to electric needs of the poorest of the poor living in rural areas. 

Living off-grid may be a lifestyle choice to some and a fact of everyday living to the poorest of the poor. However, tiny rooftop solar panels and high-efficiency LED lights across the African continent could provide enough electricity to charge cell phones. 

Cell phones are vital for people in rural areas with no access to banks in order to send and receive money, access medical care and stay in contact with family and friends.

What does Off-Grid Mean? Off the grid (off-grid) means creating your own self-sufficient environment and being able to operate completely independently of all traditional utility services. 

Many African countries believe expanding the electric grid is not cost-effective into rural communities. Therefore, a simple task of charging a cell phone is no simple matter in rural farming villages far from an electric grid. 

People walk miles to the nearest town with electricity, dropped off their cell phone at a store that recharges phones for 30 cents or more and may wait up to three days since demand is so high. Charging a cell phone is expensive considering most Africans living in rural villages live on US $1.25 to $2.50 per day.

Tiny rooftop solar panels and high-efficiency LED lights across the African continent could provide enough electricity to charge cell phones.
Cell phone charging, selling and repair business in South Africa
Rural regions of many African countries lack banks; the cellphone has been embraced as a tool for commercial transactions as well as personal communications.  

More than 69 percent of the population of sub-Saharan Africa has no access to electricity. In the rural areas, the number of people without access to electricity rises to more than 85%. 

In other words, that is over 600 million people in the 49 countries of sub-Saharan Africa lacking access to electricity. To put 600 million people into perspective, the United States has a total population of 314 million people.


Off-grid tiny rooftop solar panel systems have proved their worth, the lack of an effective distribution network or a reliable way of financing the start-up costs has prevented them from becoming more widespread. Another issue is only about 8% of solar panels are manufactured to produce electricity that does not feed into the grid.

Conflict minerals Africa

Conflict minerals three facts

Conflict minerals extracted in conflict zones are sold to spread and fund warfare throughout mineral rich Africa.

The four most commonly mined conflict minerals known, as 3TGs are Tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold.

Pick any household electronic at random such as a cell phone, a remote control, or a laptop and it probably contains minerals mined in Africa.


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Saturday, May 28, 2016

The Sahara Desert is Alive with Volcanoes

Mount Koussi, also called Emi Koussi, located in northern Chad is the highest peak of Africa’s largest driest desert, the Sahara. 


The Sahara desert is not just miles and miles of sand 



Emi Koussi volcano at 2.1 miles above sea level is the highest peak of Africa’s largest driest desert, the Sahara.
African Desert volcano Emi Koussi 
In the Sahara desert, there are lots of sand dunes, with some of them as high as 500 feet high, that’s a little more than one and a half football fields and is taller than the Statue of Liberty. The Sahara is the largest desert on the African continent and is Earth's largest hot desert. 

There are also volcanoes in the world’s largest hot desert, Emi KoussiThe Emi Koussi volcano at 2.1 miles above sea level is the highest peak of Africa’s largest driest desert, the Sahara. 
 
African Desert volcano, Emi Koussi is located in northern Chad, at the southeastern end of the Tibesti Mountain Range in the Sahara desert. Chad is largest of Africa's 16 landlocked countries with 1.284 million sq km or about 4.9 million sq miles of total land area. 

The Tibesti are a mountain range in the central Sahara desert, mainly located in northern Chad and a small portion in southern Libya. 


Africa's Emi Koussi volcano formation



The Tibesti are a mountain range in the central Sahara desert, mainly located in northern Chad and a small portion in southern Libya.
Tibesti Mountains
Emi Koussi volcano was formed from lava flows that were not very thick; the lava flowed more like thin gravy than very thick gravy. Emi Koussi is a typical class of volcano composed of layers of hardened lava, tephra or fragmental material, and volcanic ash.

According to NASA, the summit of Emi Koussi includes three calderas formed by powerful eruptions. A caldera is a large, usually circular depression at the summit of a volcano formed when magma is withdrawn or erupted from a shallow underground magma reservoir. 

Two older and overlapping calderas form a large depression surrounded by a distinctive rim. The youngest and smallest caldera, Era Kohor, formed because of eruptive activity within the past 2 million years. 

Young volcanic features of the Emi Koussi, including lava flows and scoria cones are also thought to be less than 2 million years old. There are no historical records of eruptions at Emi Koussi, but there is an active thermal area on the southern side of the volcano.

Climbing and exploring Emi Koussi




The Tibesti Mountains are one of the most significant and perhaps least studied intra continental volcanic regions of the world. Political instability and the harsh Saharan climate have limited field access to the area. 

The best time to climb the Emi Koussi is November to March.  It does not present any particular difficulty as the climbing, the main obstacles being access, logistics and insecurity. Emi Koussi was first ascended in 1938 by Wilfred Thesiger.

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Thursday, May 26, 2016

Potjiekos Chicken and Plantain Stew

Potjiekos (Pot = potjie and Food =kos) is a traditional Southern African Afrikaner stew cooked in a cast iron pot over an open fire. Our version of Potjiekos Chicken and Plantain Stew is made on the stovetop and served with love.


Potjiekos Chicken and Plantain Stew


Ingredients:
Potjiekos (Pot = potjie and Food =kos) is a traditional Southern African Afrikaner stew cooked in a cast iron pot over an open fire.
Potjiekos Chicken and Plantain Stew
4 chicken thighs with skin
2 medium onions, finely sliced
2 ripe plantains, sliced
2 medium carrots, cut into strips
2 medium potatoes, diced
1 large tomato, sliced
2 sprigs chopped parsley
1 sprig thyme
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 hot pepper, finely chopped
1 teaspoon ground cloves
2 teaspoons curry powder
1 tablespoon any flavor chutney
2 dried bay leaves
4 cups water
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Add all ingredients to a large lidded stew pot, simmer for 1 hour. Serve over rice or with soft bread.

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Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Stubborn Mule African Proverb

When you receive advice that you refuse to follow, do not be surprised at the results.


When you receive advice that you refuse to follow, do not be surprised at the results.

You roll your eyes and say I know…I know but, in the end a tree falls on you and you die ~ African Proverb



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Monday, May 23, 2016

Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Yesterday, today and tomorrow, children are our future teach them well and let them lead the way.



Yesterday, today and tomorrow, children are our future teach them well and let them lead the way.

Today’s seedlings are tomorrow's flowers – African Proverb

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Sunday, May 22, 2016

Beauty and Blemishes of Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone in the beginning, its Civil War, Blood Diamonds, Ebola and Illegal Fishing Issue, Sierra Leone’s beauty and blemishes make this African country what she is today, resilient.



Sierra Leone in the beginning


Sierra Leone’s beauty and blemishes make this African country what she is today, resilient.The British set up a trading post near present day Freetown in the 17th century. Originally, the trade involved timber and ivory, but later it expanded into slaves. 

Following the American Revolution, a colony was established in 1787 and Sierra Leone became a destination for resettling black loyalists who had originally been resettled in Nova Scotia. The capital, Freetown, was founded as a home for repatriated former slaves in 1787.

After the abolition of the slave trade in 1807, British crews delivered thousands of Africans liberated from illegal slave ships to Sierra Leone, particularly Freetown. The colony which already included native ethnic groups of Temne, Mende, Limba, Kono, Mandingo, and Loko. The Kriole ethnic groups are descendants of freed Jamaican slaves.



Sierra Leone Civil War, Blood Diamonds and Ebola

Independence was attained in 1961. Democracy is slowly being reestablished after the civil war from 1991-2002 that resulted in tens of thousands of deaths and the displacement of more than 2 million people, about one third of the population.

During its civil war, it is estimated that Sierra Leone conflict diamonds represented about 4% of the world's diamond production. Conflict diamonds or blood diamonds are diamonds that originate from areas controlled by forces opposed to legitimate and internationally recognized governments, and are used to fund military action arming rebel groups and terrorizing civilians.During its civil war, it is estimated that Sierra Leone conflict diamonds represented about 4% of the world's diamond production. 

Conflict diamonds or blood diamonds are diamonds that originate from areas controlled by forces opposed to legitimate and internationally recognized governments, and are used to fund military action arming rebel groups and terrorizing civilians. Diamonds fuel Africa's civil war conflicts.

In March 2014, the closure of the UN Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Sierra Leone marked the end of more than 15 years of peacekeeping and political operations in Sierra Leone. The government stated its priorities are furthering development including recovering from the Ebola epidemic, creating jobs, and stamping out endemic corruption.

From 2014 to current, Sierra Leone declared a state of emergency to attack the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa that continues into 2016, killing more than 11,000 people in the region. 

The World Health Organization confirmed a second case of Ebola in the Tonkolili District of Sierra Leone on January 20, 2016. The patient was a relative of the person whose death from Ebola was confirmed on January 15, 2016. Sierra Leone was previously declared Ebola transmission free on November 7, 2015.
Following the American Revolution, a colony was established in 1787 and Sierra Leone became a destination for resettling black loyalists who had originally been resettled in Nova Scotia.
The Ebola epidemic, which began in Guinea in December 2013, infected more than 28,000 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Before Ebola, the countries were three of the poorest in the world.

Sierra Leone Ebola epidemic threatened to stop the progress of the country’s economic and social growth. The challenges of endemic corruption, high youth unemployment (more than 40% of Sierra Leone's population is under 15 years old), inadequate services, and widespread poverty are still critical barriers to progress.

Sierra Leone Illegal Fishing Issue


Opportunities for aqua farming are plentiful in Sierra Leone's marine environment and the inland water bodies. Sierra Leone’s industrial fisheries are significantly export-oriented and the fleet ownership is foreign based. According to Environmental Justice Foundation (EJF) website has developed partnerships with local communities, the Government of Sierra Leone and local and international organizations working to combat pirate fishing.

Eight Interesting Facts About Sierra Leone


·        Official Name: Republic of Sierra Leone
·        Capital: Freetown
·        Population:  6.1 million
·        Size: 71,740 sq km or 27,699 sq miles
·        Languages Spoken:  English, Krio (Creole language derived from English) and a range of African languages
·        Major religions: Islam and Christianity
·        Life expectancy: 48 years for men, 49 years for women
·        Average age: 19 years old

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Saturday, May 21, 2016

Black Rhino Therapeutic Oil Recipe

Black Rhino Therapeutic Oil Recipe

Black Rhino
South African herbalists therapeutic oil recipe
Madame Aziamadi Massan, 70, is the neighborhood herbalist. At her stand in the streets of Bè-Ablogamé, a neighborhood in the port district of Lomé, Togo’s capital, she sells cures for malaria, high blood pressure, anemia, eye problems, sexual impotence and anything else that ails you.

South African herbalists or Inyanga have thousands of years of herbal knowledge

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture


Treating ailments using plants growing in the garden and in the wild. Still to this day, many South Africans have faith in the healing powers of the Inyanga.

Black Rhino Therapeutic Oil Recipe


Ingredients:
Black Rhino Therapeutic Oil Recipe, many South Africans have faith in the healing powers of the Inyanga or South African herbalists.
Black Rhino Therapeutic Oil Recipe
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
2 teaspoons ground black caraway seeds
1/2 teaspoon black sea salt or basic sea salt
½ cup olive oil

Directions:
In a small saucepan add all ingredients carefully heat the oil up to body temperature or approximately 98 degrees Fahrenheit; if you accidentally allow the oil to get too hot, let it to cool to the proper temperature. Caution, do not overheat mixture or you will cause severe burns, only use mixture lukewarm which is 98 degrees F or 36 degrees Celsius.


Uses:
Variations of Black Rhino Therapeutic Oil recipe has been used for centuries by natural healers. Apply the lukewarm oil mixture externally as a heat rub used to relax muscles easing stiffness.

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Thursday, May 19, 2016

Why Frogs Croak African Folklore

It is a common belief male frogs croaks are love serenades meant to attract a lover. However, the true reason frogs croak is explained in the ancient African Folklore Why Frogs Croak.



Why Frogs Croak African Folklore


The true reason frogs croak is explained in the ancient African Folklore Why Frogs Croak.The animals arrange a wrestling match between frog and elephant. It is agreed that at the beginning of the match, at the signal each contestant will rush forward into the wrestling match and begin the contest. 

However, elephant comes so fast, that he stumbles and falls over on his back, frog jumps through elephant's legs, pins him and wins the match. All Frog's relatives began to croak, and to this day, they crock to each other celebrating the victory over elephant.

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Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Kibera Kenya Profitable Slum Tours

Kibera Kenya Profitable Slum Tours

Kibera Kenya, Kibera Slum Tours
Generations have lived in Kenya’s largest slum of Kibera, one of Africa’s largest squatters settlements. Kibera slum is well for its crime, overcrowding, poverty, lack of proper sanitation and of course tourism.
Kibera Kenya

Kibera Slum in Kenya is a little smaller than New York’s Central Park and receives just as many tourists.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Kibera (Key-bear-a) is a Nubian word meaning Forest or Jungle. Slum tourism is alive and well in Africa and Kenya Kibera is no exception. Selling guided trips through Kibera, a short drive from the luxury hotels that serve most foreign visitors in Nairobi is not unusual.


About Kibera


Over 100 years ago, Nubian soldiers and their families who worked for the British colonial army were the original settlers of Kibera. It is situated three miles from Kenya’s capital city of Nairobi.

Kibera is one of Africa’s largest squatters’ settlements. Fifteen densely populated villages make up this slum. Residents of Kibera are officially squatters and do not own, rent or otherwise have lawful permission to use the land, the land belongs to the government of Kenya. However, this does not stop slumlords from charging rent when families move into vacated shacks. 

Generations have lived in Kenya’s largest slum of Kibera, one of Africa’s largest squatters’ settlements.
Kibera (Key-bear-a) is a Nubian word meaning Forest or Jungle.
Life in Kibera is characterized by extreme poverty, high unemployment, lack of access to basic services, and high HIV/AIDS rates. Kibera is the largest slum in Nairobi, and the second largest urban slum in Africa. The population of Kibera is very young; around 40% of the population is under the age of 20 due to high mortality rates from AIDS.

The population estimates for Kibera range from 100,000 to 1 million. The discrepancy in population numbers is because Kibera is what is known as a squatters housing settlements meaning most of the houses are temporary, and the population is hard to calculate. However, the most recent census places the population around 200,000.

Many Kibera residents resent the fact that so many NGO's in their community but there is little change.
Life in Kibera
Kibera size is 617 acres or 2.5 square kilometers, a little smaller than New York’s Central Park. Only about 20% of Kibera has electricity and 10% of the Kiberans have access to clean water, there is currently no sewage system in Kibera. Food, water and basic housing costs money, however, currently there is little to no work for residents, 50% are unemployed.


Kibera Kenya Profitable Slum Tours


Kibera is overrun with NGO’s or Non-Governmental Organizations. It is popularly believed some NGO’s are actually helpful to some degree, but given the sheer number of organizations in Kibera, there are hardly any improvements of the situation making residents wonder or even become cynical is “real” help available. 

Many Kibera residents resent the fact that so many NGO's in their community and there is little change. In fact, private companies are making a profit from the poverty in Kibera by offering "friendly slum tours" to foreigners visiting Kenya charging 2,500 Kenyan Shillings or $24 US dollars per person.

Time Magazine boasts as number four on their list of the best places to visit in Kenya is the slum of Kibera. On their website Time Magazine states "A visit to the world's biggest slum might not sound like a good time, but a few hours in Kibera is always educational and its residents' resilience can be inspiring. Unescorted visits are not advised, but several agencies run tours of this million-strong township, which might include a visit to an orphanage, a bead factory or even a solar-power project.

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Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Dressed Up Trash Can African Proverbs

Dressed Up Trash Can African Proverbs

Rotting from the inside out
Beautiful on the outside, but rotten on the inside, dressed up trash can African Proverbs teaches people who do not respect themselves can never respect anyone else.

Pray

Dressed Up Trash Can African Proverbs


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Seven Dressed Up Trash Can African Proverbs

Beautiful on the outside, but rotten on the inside, dressed up trash can African Proverbs
Dressed Up Trash Can African Proverbs
The tail of a goat cleans where it is seated.


Do not scratch the cockroach's scars.


It is the feathers that make a chicken big.


A liar is like heap of straw that covers other things while its own roots are wet.


He who has not clapped what neighbor is success that means he has a baboon's heart.


Once swallowed it is not sweet anymore.



Manhood is beneath the clothing.


Omo Valley Ethiopia Hammer Woman

O dabi iru eefin kan, ti o dara julọ ti o si jẹ ọlọla sibẹ ti o buru ju. -Yoruba 


She was like a volcano, beautiful and majestic yet utterly deadly. - English


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Sunday, May 15, 2016

Ostrich Vegetable Stew Recipe

What does Ostrich meat taste like? Ostrich meat tastes like beef.



Ostrich Meat is a red meat low in fat and is used in any recipe using red meat. Ostrich meat is naturally low in fat and is used for frying, stewing, sautéing or in any of dish as a substitute for beef.

Ostrich Vegetable Stew Recipe


Ostrich Meat is a red meat low in fat and is used in any recipe using red meat.Ingredients:
1 ½ pounds cleaned ostrich
4 cloves garlic crushed
2 diced medium sized tomatoes
1 medium onion, sliced
1 cup baby carrots
2 cups peeled diced yucca 
3 cups green beans
1 teaspoon lemon juice
2 teaspoons coriander
1 hot pepper chopped
2 cups vegetable stock
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
In a large pot on medium heat, add oil then sauté garlic one minute. Add remaining ingredients. Simmer covered for 30 minutes.

Did you know…Ostrich Meat is a red meat low in fat and is used in any recipe using red meat.


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Saturday, May 14, 2016

Easy Plantain Cassava Foufou Recipe

Plantain Cassava Foufou is a staple African food recipe made throughout the African continent. 


How to eat Foufou


Simply tear off a small piece of Foufou hold it with your fingers making a slight indentation to hold the food and scoop up a small portion bringing the food and tasty Foufou into your mouth and savoring the homemade taste.

Plantain Cassava Foufou African recipe is indispensable to any meal to scoop up delicious food and soak up every bit of flavor. 


African Plantain Cassava Foufou Recipe


Ingredients:
Plantain Cassava Foufou African recipe is indispensable to any meal to scoop up delicious food and soak up every bit of flavor.
Pounded Foufou
3 green or yellow plantains
1 medium cassava 
1 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
Water for boiling

Directions:
In a large pot place the peeled and evenly cut plantains and cassava and cover with water. 

Boil until soft about 20 minutes. 

Place the salt, flour, plantains and cassava in a mixer and knead until the consistency of soft dough is achieved. 

Foufou should be much stiffer than mashed potatoes in texture. Foufou is used to scoop up sauce, soups and stews. Foufou can be prepared in advance and reheated.

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Chic African Culture Featured Articles

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The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

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A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.