Find your true life work in Africa.

Find your true life work in Africa. Africa is home to more unknown history than known. A map of Africa does not begin to show the vastness of people, culture, food, living and ancient history of the African continent. Established 2008 Chic African Culture is a learning tool to meet the demand for better education about the entire continent of Africa.

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Find your true life work in Africa.

A lion that is caged will hate the one that is free. - with love from your ancestors

Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Smartest Person in the Room African Folklore

Smartest Person in the Room African Folklore Story

Crocodile thought himself to be the smartest person in the room but as we shall soon see in this African Folklore, thinking yourself to be the smartest person in the room is usually a big mistake.


Smartest Person in the Room African Folklore



Crocodile and a Gazelle lived together with their wives and families in the same town. One day the Crocodile said, "My good friend Gazelle, let us go and buy some drums in the Oko country."


"All right," replied the Gazelle; but where are we to get the money from?"
"I have the money!” answered the Crocodile.


Crocodile thought himself to be the smartest person in the room
Crocodile thought himself to be the smartest
person in the room
They started out on their shopping trip and when they walked a little way Crocodile snarled, 

"Wait here! I must return to our town, as I have forgotten something." The Crocodile returned to town, went to the Gazelle’s wife, and said, "My friend has sent me for his children."


Mrs. Gazelle gave them to him, and putting them into a bag, he returned to the place where he left the Gazelle.


They started again, and when they had travelled a long distance the Crocodile saw some honey in a hole in one of the trees, whereupon he said to the Gazelle: "Wait for me here while I go to eat the honey, but you must not undo the bag and look inside!"


The Gazelle was left to guard the sack, which he quickly untied and looking in, he exclaimed: "Why, my children, what is going on here!" He put the bag on his back and hurried home, gave his children back to his wife, and went to the Crocodile's house and said, "My friend has sent me for his children." Mrs. Crocodile gave them to him. Gazelle put the children in the bag and returned quickly to the spot where the Crocodile had left him.


Crocodile thought himself to be the smartest person in the room but as we shall soon see in this African Folklore, thinking yourself to be the smartest person in the room is usually a big mistake.
"Wait for me here while I go to eat the honey,
but you must not undo the bag and look inside!"
After a time the Crocodile arrived, licking the honey off his lips, and picking up the bag, away they went again on their shopping journey.


By and by they reached Oko country and picked out two beautiful hand carved drums. When Crocodile went to pay for them, he whispered to the drum maker "Don't undo the bag now, there are some gazelles in it for payment for your drums."


As they were returning home, they tried the drums. The Crocodile beat a tune and sang, "Stupid people go on foolish journeys." For the Crocodile thought, the Gazelle had helped to sell his own children for drums. The Gazelle then beat a tune and sang: "At the place where they ate honey they left their bag of wisdom."


The Crocodile did not know he had exchanged his own children for drums for he thought himself smarter than anyone else. On their way home they played and sang in many towns, and received money and presents for their entertainment.


On reaching their town the Gazelle hurried to his house, and sent off his wife and children to hide in the woods.


Crocodile went to his house and looking round, he asked his wife, "Where are my children?" His wife answered, "Why, you sent the Gazelle for them and now you ask 'Where are the children?'


"The Crocodile went in great rage to the Gazelle's house, but the Gazelle ran away, and as he was escaping, he cried out, "I am the wise Gazelle who outwitted crocodile who thinks himself smarter than everyone else!"


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Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Crime and Punishment African Proverbs

Crime and Punishment African Proverbs

Injustice, crime and punishment are a few of the massive human rights issues affecting billions of people around the world. When governments, companies and private industries are able make a profit off crime, is justice actually blind?







Injustice, crime and punishment are a few of the massive human rights issues affecting billions of people around the world.

Crime and Punishment African Proverbs



Poverty is the companion of injustice.



Crime eats its own children.



A wise man can see more from the bottom of a well than a fool can from a mountaintop.
Crime and Punishment African Proverbs
Crime and Punishment African Proverbs



The greatest crime in a desert is to find water and keep silent about it.



Death is nothing and pain is nothing, but cowardice is crime and disgrace, the greatest punishment.



Shantytowns may generate crime, but mansions profit.



Like rotten mangoes, crime leaves a foul smell.



Corn can't expect justice from a court composed of chickens.


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Saturday, March 26, 2016

Old Fashioned Zomo Rabbit Stew Recipe

Old Fashioned Zomo Rabbit Stew Recipe
Rabbit recipe

Rabbit meat is white meat high in protein and low in fat and cholesterol.




Rabbit Stew Recipe
African rabbits live in more than 25 African countries in West, East, South and Central Africa. Rabbit habitats include meadows, woods, forests, grasslands, deserts and wetlands. There are over 30 different breeds of rabbits; some are good for meat production some for fur production and some for both.

Old Fashioned Zomo Rabbit Stew Recipe

Nigeria's Favorite Rabbit Stew photo by pretty emmy
African Recipes by

Old fashioned Zomo Rabbit Stew recipe is a traditional tasty game meat rabbit stew recipe from South, East, Central and West Africa.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients

1 large rabbit cut into 8 pieces
2 cups sliced carrots
2 chopped onions
1 large tomato diced
1 large bell pepper diced
2 large Irish potatoes diced
1 teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon red pepper
1 hot pepper sliced
2 bay leaves
Juice of one lemon or 1 tablespoon vinegar
4 cups of water


Directions


In a large pot add rabbit, water and lemon or vinegar and bay leaves. Simmer together slowly until rabbit is tender 1 hour.  Add remaining ingredients simmer 30 minutes longer. Serve with rice.


Did you know?
Rabbits are the most productive of domestic livestock animals taking only takes 6 months to grow into adulthood. Their gestation period is only 30 days. Female rabbits can average 30 births per year.

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Friday, March 25, 2016

What is the food like in Africa?

What is the food like in Africa? If you like French, Italian, English, Caribbean, American, Spanish, Dutch, and native foods; you will love African food.



What is the food like in Africa? If you like French, Italian, English, Caribbean, American, Spanish, Dutch and native foods; you will love African food.

What is the food like in Africa



In Africa, you will find dishes influenced by people who lived there for millions as years as well as major influences from cultures that colonized Africa and newly established fast food chain restaurants. 

In addition, with a range of climates and growing conditions, the ingredients for African cuisine are diverse. It is impossible to group African food into one category.

Food recipes of a community are often closely related to where they live as well as the increasing urbanization of African populations. Large well-known American retail and fast food companies see South Africa as a gateway into the growing African market.
African Street Food Fresh Grilled Gingered Corn


Seattle Coffee has been operating in South Africa since 1996, Cinnabon launched in South Africa in 2006 looking to open stores in Egypt, Libya, and Morocco. Krispy Kreme is opened in Johannesburg November 2015 looking to expand to Kenya, Nigeria and Ghana. Dunkin Donuts has also announced plans to set up shop in South Africa in 2016.

Generalizations about African food are not helpful in describing a subject as complex as diets, which depend on many economic, environmental, social and cultural factors.

Fish curry food recipe from Ghana AfricaAfrican food recipes are usually based on a carbohydrate staple served with soups, relishes and sauces, which may or may not be spicy, prepared from a wide variety of other ingredients.


With local influences, colonization and a growing fast food market, there is no way to precisely describe African food except, the food of Africa reflects its history and future.


African food

African food three facts

African food recipes vary from village to village, town to town, city to city and the 54 African countries on the African continent have its own food influences.

African food recipes are usually based on a carbohydrate staple.

It is impossible to group African food into one category.


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Wednesday, March 23, 2016

Eating Contest Between the Chicken and Elephant African Folklore

Eating contest between the chicken and elephant African folklore teaches elephant to never challenge someone thin to an eating contest.


Eating Contest Between the Chicken and Elephant African Folklore


An elephant and a chicken had a disagreement about who could eat the most?"

The chicken said to the elephant, "I can eat more than you," and the elephant said to the chicken, "You, chicken are not a mouthful for me, and will you say, that you can eat more food than I? Stop in and next morning we will go together to the forest, and then we shall see which of us eats the most."

The chicken accepted the elephant's challenge, got ready, and went to the elephants’ house the next day, saying, "Elephant! Get up, and let us go to the forest, to seek food and eat!"

The elephant and the chicken went to the forest, and on their arrival began to eat.

Eating Contest Between the Chicken and Elephant African FolkloreWhatever trees the elephant saw, he broke and ate, and whatever fruit he saw, he plucked and ate.

The chicken scratched the ground, and whatever insects it saw, it took and swallowed.

Both of them looked for food and ate till about noon. 

The belly of the elephant was full so he went, and lay down under a tree, will the chicken whose appetite had not yet been satisfied, scratched the ground and still ate whatever food it scratched on the ground.

About two o'clock in the afternoon the chicken arose and went to the elephant, and finding the elephant lying down, it said to him, "Brother elephant, you said you can beat me eating, but when we began to eat together, and you ate a little food, then you said, 'I have enough,' and let me to lie down in the shade!" 

The elephant was annoyed, as he heard the chicken speak, yet he stood up, and began again to eat. Whatever trees he saw, he broke and ate, and whatever leaves of trees he saw, he pulled down and ate. When it became dark, the elephant's hunger was pacified, and the chicken saw him go and lie down again. The chicken still went on scratching the ground, and seeking and eating food; and when the sun had set, it went back again to the elephant, stood, and said to him,

"You who argued with me, saying, that you could eat more than I, but I had not yet enough. The elephant heard what the chicken said; and having slept, the chicken arose the next morning, and went to the elephant, saying, "Brother Elephant, get ready, that we may go to the forest, to seek food to eat!"

The elephant stood up and said to the chicken, "Today is three days that I have been eating with you, and I have now eaten enough, but you, little thing have never eaten enough; if we live in the same place, you will, by and bye, even eat me up!"

Because of this the elephant and the chicken are no longer friends and the elephant never challenged the chicken to another eating contest.

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Tuesday, March 22, 2016

African Woman Tegla Loroupe Won the New York City Marathon

Tegla Loroupe first African woman to win the New York City Marathon

Tegla C. Loroupe is a Kenyan and the first African woman to win the New York City Marathon. She is also a philanthropist for global peace, and womans education.





What’s wrong with Africa? 


Out of the many challenges facing Africa today, violence and political turmoil dominate the headline news stories. However, there are millions of enlightened people living in Africa who are wise and caring of others but their voices are rarely heard above a whisper.

"Lay down your arms and focus on development and education issues " - Tegla Loroupe


Who is Tegla Loroupe?

African Woman Tegla Loroupe Won the New York City Marathon
African Woman Tegla Loroupe Won the New York City Marathon

In 1994, Tegla Loroupe was the first African woman to win the New York City Marathon. She is currently a global spokesperson for peace, women's rights, and education. Loroupe started the Tegla Loroupe Peace Foundation in 2003 because when she looked back at her Pokot community in Kenya, she could not remember a time when they were not at war with the neighboring Turkana, Karamoja and Marakwet communities over grazing land and cultural demands. Loroupe embarked on a mission to save people afflicted by the war and organized peace races that would unite the fighting communities.



Marathon peace races are an annual event held in cattle farming communities of Eastern Uganda, Northern Kenya, and South Sudan using sports as a tool to bring people together. The focal point is the warriors’ 10km road race where rivaling factions put aside their differences and unite in the spirit of sport.



In addition, the training center is used as a training facility for refugees hoping to participate in the 2016 Rio Olympics as marathon runners. What’s special about the athletes at the center is all are from Kenya’s Dadaab and Kakuma, two of the world's largest refugee camps.

Some African countries still are mired in conflict and peace remains fragile in many others.

“Sport brings people together, irrespective of language or beliefs” - Tegla Loroupe


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Sunday, March 20, 2016

Warrior African Queen Nzinga

Warrior African Queen Nzinga

History of Warrior African Queen Nzinga





Queen Nzinga Mbande was a military strategist and powerful 17th-century female African ruler of the Ndongo and Matamba Kingdoms.






Queen Nzinga is remembered in Angola for her war strategy and political intelligence

Queen Nzinga was one of the most clever women rulers of 17th century Africa fighting against the slave trade. Born in 1583, Queen Nzinga Mbande was the 17th-century queen of the Ndongo Kingdom and the newly established Matamba Kingdom.



In 1617, Mbandi Ngola Kiluanji, king of Ndongo, dies. His son, Ngola Mbandi, takes power and becomes the new king. However, he does not have his father's personality or his sister's military intelligence. Her brother King Ngola Mbande realized the Portuguese established a settlement in the same year invading Mbundu land in order to imprison its people into slavery.


In 1626, Princess Nzinga became Queen of the Mbundu succeeding her brother King Ngola Mbande. European slave traders on the coast of southern Africa upset the political, social, economic and cultural landscape of the kingdom Ndongo and the entire region. In the same year, the Matamba Kingdom was established after Queen Nzinga and her Mbundu citizens were forced from their ancestral lands by raiding Portuguese slave traders.


In the newly established Matamba Kingdom, Queen Nzinga established a Mocambo settlement offering sanctuary to runaway slaves and those who experienced oppression by the Portuguese, Dutch, and other colonial and African powers. Mocambo is a Mbundu word of the Bantu people living in Angola's North-West area; Mocambo means hideout.


A figure of the African resistance to colonialism, Queen Njinga marked the history of 17th century Angola. Outstanding and skilled strategist negotiator, she defended her country relentlessly until her death, in 1663, at the age of 82 years. However, before her death, Queen Nzinga converted to Christianity, adopted the name Dona Anna de Souza, and made the Matamba Kingdom a formidable military state that dealt with the Portuguese traders on an equal footing.




Queen Nzinga became a sensation in Europe following the 1769 publication of Jean Louis Castilhon’s book, Zingha, Reine d’Angola, in Paris. Queen Nzinga is remembered in Angola for her war strategy and political intelligence, a statue of her was placed in Kinaxixi square in the heart of Luanda Angola in Southern Africa in 2002. Queen Nzinga statue was dedicated by President Santos to celebrate the 27th anniversary of Angola’s independence.


Queen Nzinga is remembered in Angola for her political and diplomatic career


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Saturday, March 19, 2016

Fighting for Land, Oil, and People of Western Sahara

Fighting for Land, Oil, and People of Western Sahara

Africa's Western Sahara fight for freedom has been a 40 year battle with no resolution in sight. The disputed territory is on the northwest coast of Africa bordered by Morocco, Mauritania, and Algeria




Fighting for Land, Oil, and People of Western Sahara


Western Sahara has a population of around 554 thousand people. After Spain withdrew from Western Sahara in 1976, Morocco seized the area in 1979, following Mauritania's withdrawal.

War broke out in the same year due to the Frente Polisario people's party contesting Morocco's self-proclaimed rule over the territory. 

Since 1979, the Frente Polisario has been recognized by the United Nations as the representative of the people of Western Sahara. The Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic led by President Mohamed Abdelaziz is in exile in Algeria. About 95,000 Sahrawi refugees continue to be sheltered in camps in Tindouf, Algeria, which has housed Sahrawi refugees since the 1980s.

The United Nations Mission for the Referendum in Western Sahara or MINURSO was initiated in 1985 and established by Security Council resolution 690 on April 29, 1991. 

MINURSO provided for the sole and exclusive responsibility for monitoring ceasefires, verifying the reduction of Moroccan troops in the territory, overseeing exchanges of prisoners of war, identify and register qualified voters.

In August 1994, MINURSO began the process of identifying potential voters in which the people of Western Sahara would choose between independence and integration with Morocco. In May 1996, the Secretary-General suspended the identification process but the military component remained to monitor and verify ceasefires.

[Read Next: 50 Facts about Africa for Kids]


The identification process was finally completed in 1999, however, aspects of the identification process, the appeals process itself, the return of refugees and other crucial aspects of the MINURSO plan remains in dispute by the Frente Polisario people's party and the Government of Morocco. 

Over 20 years later, the United Nations continues talks with the parties to seek a resolution, Western Sahara remains a hotly disputed territory in West Africa for land, oil, and people to this day.


Africa's Western Sahara fight for freedom has been a 40 year battle with no resolution in sight.
Africa’s Western Sahara Disputed Territory



Did you know?
Western Sahara’s former names are Rio de Oro, Saguia el Hamra, and Spanish Sahara. 


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Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Short African Story Have Common Sense Before Acting

Short African Story Have Common Sense Before Acting

Short African Story explains do not believe all you hear. Leopard Boils his Mother's Teeth Short African Story teaches to have common sense before acting. Even very smart people sometimes lack common sense, but in this Short African Story, Leopard has no sense by literally believing everything Gazelle says.


Short African Story Leopard Boils his Mother's Teeth
Leopard had no common sense

Short African Story Have Common Sense Before Acting Why Did Leopard Boils his Mother's Teeth?



So the elders say, one day a Gazelle bought some corn at the market, and while he was boiling them at home, the Leopard paid him a visit and asked him: "Sister Gazelle, what are you cooking on the stove?"

The Gazelle replied, "I am boiling my mother's teeth."

"Really!" exclaimed the Leopard "let me taste them." So the Gazelle gave him some of the cooked corn, and the Leopard thought the food so good that he went home and pulled out all his mother's teeth, and put them to boil on the stove.

The Gazelle, passing the house, called in, and seeing the pot on the fire, asked the Leopard what he was cooking. "I am cooking my mother's teeth, but they don't get soft," answered the Leopard.

The Gazelle laughingly said, "I meant corn, and you have pulled out and are boiling all your mother's teeth!" The Leopard was so angry at what he had foolishly done but before he could chase the Gazelle, it ran away laughing at the Leopard for his foolishness in mistaking corn for teeth.


Leopard Boils his Mother's Teeth African Folklore teaches us to hear and understand what is said and discern jokiness from actuality.

Links to more African Folklore

In everyday life, Short African Stories teach lessons with words of wisdom.


Baboon Shepherd African Folklore

The Bird That Made Milk African Folklore

Why Some Souls Are White and Others Black

Legend of Deepest Darkest Africa

Rabbit Angered Moon African Folktale

Nkasa Tree Test for Witches

Chic African Culture and The African Gourmet=


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Monday, March 14, 2016

Accept Your Body African Proverbs

Many of us go through life feeling less than loving toward our own bodies. We believe we are not attractive enough, flawed in one way or another.



Learning to accept, appreciate, and even love every aspect of our bodies African proverbs teach us we are free to enjoy richer, more intimate relationships when we first love ourselves.

Accept Your Body African Proverbs lesson is similar to the sculpture Bronskvinnorna or The Women of Bronze in Växjö, Sweden
Accept Your Body African Proverbs
lesson is similar
to the sculpture Bronskvinnorna
or The Women of Bronze
in Växjö, Sweden 



Accept Your Body African Proverbs



You will then learn your measure, when you spend a night with yourself.


Look at a person’s deeds, not whether they are tall or short.


One can be kept well by a hundred, not a hundred by one.


Who dies inside has lost.


The load that the mule will not carry, you yourself should not carry.


Although there are many roads, there is only one that is the straightest.


The thorn which is sharp is so from its youth.


A person’s values are not nullified by passing storms.


Who today is humiliated easily, tomorrow will be lost.


Fear and shame are father and son.


Until one dies, others will not be satisfied.


Accept Your Body African Proverbs
Links to more African Proverbs

In everyday life, African proverbs inspire with ancient words of wisdom.

African proverbs bring people together, read and study more proverbs, quotes, and sayings from the African continent.

African Proverbs Are Often Difficult To Understand

Telling African Folklore Stories in East Africa

Proverbs are the official language of the African Nation

Monday Morning African Proverb Quotes

Prepare the Mind for Elevation

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Saturday, March 12, 2016

Ujima Being a Force for Good

Ujima in Swahili means achieved with the help of others

Ujima

Everybody needs somebody to lean on. Ujima creates an understanding that no person is an island and the well-being of ourselves strengthens families which in turn strengthens the community. Ujima is being a force for good.

Ujima Being a Force for Good


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Stress has a major effect on the body. Ujima means organizing friends, family, neighbors, co-workers, business owners and investors to create a supportive community. Ujima means being a force for good.



Being a force for good, Ujima, in someone's life can help build a lasting community bond. When you help others, you give off positive vibes, which can rub off on your peers and improve your friendships, according to a study by the National Institutes of Health. Both parties will contribute to maintaining a mutually beneficial dynamic.

Whether with a large group of people in a volunteer organization, or just between two friends exchanging words of advice, helping people creates a feeling of community. “Face-to-face activities such as volunteering at a drop-in center can help reduce loneliness and isolation,” according to the Mental Health Foundation.

Kindness is contagious, according to a study by researchers at University of California, Los Angeles, and University of Cambridge and University of Plymouth in the United Kingdom. “When we see someone else help another person it gives us a good feeling,” the study states, “Which in turn causes us to go out and do something altruistic ourselves.”

How do you pronounce Ujima? Ujima is a Swahili healing word pronounced OOO-G-MA. Ujima is collective work and responsibility; to build and maintain our community, while working with others to solve our problems.


Did you know?

Ujima is day three of Kwanzaa celebrated between December 26 and January 1 every year.




You can go fast, if you go alone You can go far, if you go together  African Proverb - Ujima Being a Force for Good


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Wednesday, March 9, 2016

Africa in a Glass | Mstafeli Soursop Milk Drink Recipe

Mstafeli Soursop Milk Drink Recipe

African Mstafeli also known as Soursop fruit can be eaten fresh when fully ripe or mixed with milk to make a delicious exotic fruity shake.


African Mstafeli also known as Soursop fruit can be eaten fresh when fully ripe or mixed with milk to make a delicious exotic fruity shake.


Mstafeli Soursop Milk Drink Recipe



Ingredients

2 very ripe soursop fruits peeled, deseeded and mashed
4 cups cold whole or skim milk
5 ice cubes
Sugar to taste


Directions

In a blender add all ingredients, mix well and enjoy!



Did you know?
The Soursop fruit grows in humid tropical and subtropical areas of 15 African countries; Zanzibar, Benin, Cote d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Liberia, Mauritania, Nigeria, Reunion, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Togo, and Uganda.


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Tuesday, March 8, 2016

DIY African Print Phone Cases That You Can Make

Instead of buying a new phone case for your iPhone consider making a DIY African Kente cloth print of your own.


There are so many ways to rock African design. Here are three African kente cloth designs that you can print for your iPhone 4, 5, or 6 clear cases to coordinate with your outfit.

The African cloth kente is made by the Ashanti people of Ghana

What is Kente cloth

The African cloth kente is made by the Ashanti people of Ghana and the Ewe people of Ghana and Togo. Kente cloth is the most recognizable of all African textiles.

Almost every Ghanaian has a garment of kente cloth. The kente fabric is made of inter-woven silk fabric. Although you might now know the name, the kente cloth is used globally. The kente cloth is made in different styles, colors and patterns.

Meaning of the word Kente

The word kente means basket. The word kente comes from the Akan or Ashanti people. Because of the manner in which the fabric is woven, the pattern of the fabric is similar to a basket, hence kente. While the individual patterns featured in kente cloth design hold certain meanings, the collection of patterns on a single cloth hold a different symbolic meaning.
  • ·        The Golden Stool - The Golden Stool is a symbol of absolute power in Ghana. According to legend, it was sent down from the heavens 800 years ago. Today the king of the Ashanti sits upon it whenever he is in public.
  • ·        Fathia Nkrumah - Fatha Nkrumah was the wife of the first president of Ghana. This design was created in her honor.
  • ·        Baako mmu man - It takes two to council; One man cannot rule a country
  • ·        Nsatea - All fingers are not equal.
  • ·        Nnuatoma - You must measure everything that you do.


Meaning of the colors used in the Kente
  • ·        Black represents Africa
  • ·        Red represents the blood of forefathers
  • ·        Yellow represents gold
  • ·         Green represents the forest


DIY African Kente Cloth Print Phone Cases Templates





Templates for iPhone 4, 5 and 6 DIY African Kente cloth print


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Find your true life work in Africa.

A bird sits on a tree it likes - African Proverb

Chic African Culture Featured Articles

Find your true life work in Africa.


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.