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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

15 Most Popular African Herbal Medicine Ingredients

The 15 most popular herbs used in South African herbal medicine. Herbal medicine is the art and science of using herbs for stimulating health and preventing and treating sickness.


Herbal medicine has been Africa’s primary form of medicine since the beginning of time. South Africa Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) published a listing of the most popular South African Medicinal plants used in African herbalism by the Nyanga, South African herbal medicine specialists.

Most popular herbs used in the South African Herbal medicine discipline.



Aloe
Wild rosemary is one of the 15 most popular herbs used in South African herbal medicine.Leaves have been traditionally used for stomach complaints, arthritis, eczema, conjunctivitis, hypertension, and stress. They are also used to treat skin irritations and bruises.

African Ginger
Fresh roots or rhizomes can be chewed to treat influenza. It can also be used for colds, asthma, to treat malaria and by women during menstruation. The plant has also been traditionally used as an appetite suppressant and sedative.

Wild Rosemary
The leaves are rubbed and smoked for asthma and other infections of the throat and lungs.

Cancer Bush
Leaves have been traditionally used to treat fever, poor appetite, indigestion, gastritis, peptic ulcer, dysentery, cancer, diabetes, colds and flu, cough, asthma, chronic bronchitis, kidney and liver conditions, rheumatism, heart failure, urinary tract infections as well as stress and anxiety.

Devil’s Claw
Tubers have been traditionally used for treating diseases of the liver, kidneys and bladder. It can also be used to stimulate appetite, and for indigestion.

Yellow Star
The tuber has been traditionally used for benign prostate hypertrophy, urinary tract infections, and testicular tumors. They can also be used to treat dizziness, heart weakness, nervous and bladder disorder as well as depression.

Milkweed
Stems are widely used as an appetite suppressant, thirst quencher, mood enhancer and as a cure for severe abdominal cramps, hemorrhoids, tuberculosis, indigestion, hypertension, and diabetes.

Everlasting
Twigs and leaves can be used for colds, coughs, infections, headaches, fevers, menstrual pains and others.

Canna
Wild garlic is one of the 15 most popular herbs used in South African herbal medicine.The leaves can be used for the treatment of anxiety and depression.

Wild Garlic
The rhizomes and leaves are used for the treatment of fever, rheumatism, asthma and constipation. The fresh bulbs are boiled in water, the decoctions are taken orally to clear up coughs, and colds and they can be used as a remedy for pulmonary tuberculosis and to destroy intestinal worms. The leaves are used to treat cancer of the esophagus.

African Wormwood
Traditionally it is used for a wide range of ailments from coughs, colds, fever, and loss of appetite, colic, headache, earache, and intestinal worms to malaria, respiratory tract infections, influenza, sore throats, asthma, pneumonia, gastritis, indigestion, flatulence, constipation, gout and measles. The roots, stems and leaves are taken as enemas for febrile complaints, poultices, infusions, body washes, lotions, smoked, sniffed or drunk as a tea.

Pepper Bark Tree
Medicinally, the pepper-like, bitter stems and root bark are used to cure many ailments. Dried and ground, they make a snuff used to clear the sinuses. Taken orally it is believed to cure spots in the lungs. Powdered and mixed with water, they are believed to cure sores in the mouth. The bark, stems, roots and leaves are used to treat colds and respiratory complaints. It is used as a tonic for all health conditions including fever, malaria, influenza, coughs and as a natural antibiotic for chest infections. It is also used for the treatment of venereal diseases, abdominal pain and constipation, cancer, rheumatism and stomach ulcers.

Herbal medicine has been Africa’s primary form of medicine since the beginning of time. Pineapple Lily
The bulb can be used for backache, to assist in post-operative recovery and to assist in healing fractures. They are traditionally used to treat fever, hangover, urinary complaints, stomachache, colic, flatulence, and syphilis.

Rooi Raba
It is traditionally used for coughs and chest troubles and is effective for bronchitis in children. It can be used for the treatment of infections such as cough, fever, sore throat, as well as fatigue and weakness. Infusions of the tuber are used to treat dysentery and diarrhea.

Horseradish

It is used for medicinal purposes to cure various ailments such as headache, wounds or insect’s bites, bacterial or fungal skin complaints, gastric ulcers, diarrhea and treat liver and spleen problems, pains of the joints and malnutrition.

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Monday, December 28, 2015

Shimla mirch ki sabzi South African Indian Vegetable Curry Recipe

Shimla mirch ki sabzi is a classic South African Indian recipe of green peppers, tomatoes, onions, potatoes and eight spices. This simple curry recipe is a staple dish in many Durban South African Indian homes.



South African Indian Vegetable Curry Recipe

Shimla mirch ki sabzi is a classic South African Indian recipe of green peppers, tomatoes, onions, potatoes and seven spices.
South African Indian Vegetable Curry Recipe
Ingredients:
3 large green bell peppers, sliced fine
2 large potatoes, cooked and cubed
1 large onion, chopped
1 large tomato, diced
10 fresh coriander leaves
1 tablespoon ginger paste
1 tablespoon garlic paste
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
1 teaspoon red chilli flakes or to taste
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground coriander
1 teaspoon sea salt
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
½ cup water

Directions:
Over medium high heat, add oil into a large frying pan, sauté onions, tomatoes, ginger, coriander leaves and garlic, together with cumin and coriander powders for five minutes. Add remaining ingredients, and cook on medium heat for 15-20 minutes or until potatoes are soft. Serve over rice.

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Sunday, December 27, 2015

Africa Sole Food | Cow Foot Stew Recipe

How do you cook a cow foot? Easy Cow foot stew recipe is a spicy thick delicacy which cow foot is slowly stewed until tender. Cow foot stew may not sound appetizing, but when slowly simmered it is delicious.



Cow foot is quite tough; you may be able to buy calf foot which is more tender. But if you add a tablespoon of vinegar or meat tenderizer to the stew the cow foot will cook faster. Cow foot makes a thick delicious broth that has a lot of collagen and gelatin. Nigerian Cow foot stew is spicy, but there is nothing to stop you from adjusting the heat to suit your taste.


Cow Foot Stew Recipe

Ingredients:
Cow foot stew recipe is a spicy thick delicacy which cow foot is slowly stewed until tender.
1 cow foot cut up into pieces
6 cups water
Juice of one lemon or 1 tablespoon vinegar
2 cups baby carrots or sliced carrots
2 chopped onions
1 teaspoon ground cloves
1 large tomato diced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon red pepper
1 hot pepper sliced
Juice of one lemon or 1 tablespoon vinegar

Directions:
In a large pot add cow foot, water and lemon or vinegar. Simmer together slowly until cow foot is tender 2 1/2 hours.  Add remaining ingredients simmer 1 hour. Serve with rice.

Cow foot stew photo by ro boppy

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Saturday, December 26, 2015

Ginger Spice Hot Buttered Popcorn Recipe

African ginger spice hot buttered popcorn recipe is easy to make and enjoy for your next Netflix and Hulu binge night.


When you say popcorn, most people think of the kind you microwave but popcorn is so much better than that. When popped fresh on the stove, our homemade African ginger spice hot buttered popcorn recipe is as easy to make as boiling water.

African Ginger Spice Hot Buttered Popcorn Recipe

African Ginger Spice Hot Buttered Popcorn Recipe
Ingredients:
1/ 2 cup unpopped popcorn kernels
1/3 cup clarified butter
1 tablespoon coconut oil

Ginger Spice Mix
1 tablespoon powdered ginger
1 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon granulated sugar

Directions:
Over medium-high heat, warm a large heavy pot with a lid and add oils. If your oil starts to smoke, it is too hot. Test the heat of the oil by dropping in two kernels. When the kernel pops or spins in the oil, you are ready to add the remaining popcorn. Pour just enough kernels to cover the bottom of the pan. Shake the pan gently to be certain oil coats each kernel. Cover pot, remove from heat when popping slows or stops. Pour popped corn into a large bowl. Season with ginger spice mix to taste.


Did you know?

Ginger is a tropical warm climate plant herb used in cooking, spice mixes and medicine. Some ginger growing African countries are Uganda, Tanzania, Ethiopia and Nigeria with Nigeria growing ginger on a large scale. 

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Thursday, December 24, 2015

Rich Wife Poor Wife African Folklore

African Folklore story rich wife and poor wife teaches money does not always bring safety and happiness.



As the elders say, there were two girls whose father told them "You are now old enough to marry." Their hearts were glad when they received this permission, and soon they found two fine young men. The oldest sister became engaged to a poor man and the younger to a rich one.

One day the older sister paid a visit to her fiancé, and as he was poor, he could only give her fish to eat and a mat to lie on for a bed. But when the younger went to see her rich fiancé he killed a goat for her supper, gave her a fine bed with soft blankets, and in the morning killed a pig for her breakfast.  
 
African Folklore story of rich wife and poor wife
African Folklore story rich wife and poor wife.
The two sisters happened to meet at the crossroads, they asked each other what presents they had received, and when the younger sister saw the poor gift received by the older, she showed her presents with much vanity and laughed at her older sister for having such a poor fiancé. This occurred every time they visited their young men—the
younger sister laughed to scorn the poverty of the elder sister's suitor.

Soon the day of their marriages arrived, and the rich man gave a fat pig for the feast and sent his bride a piece of velvet, a piece of white cloth, and a piece of satin. The poor man could only send some chickens for the feast and give his bride one piece of ordinary cloth.

After the marriage celebrations were over the new wives went to live in the houses of their husbands.

Before many days had passed the younger bride committed a small mistake, and her husband in his anger cut off her ears. In a week, he was angry about some other small matter, he cut off her nose, and the next time she upset him with some small mistake he cut off her head. Thus, she did not live long to enjoy her fine things.


As for the poor husband, he said to his wife "It is not until death comes to me that we shall separate." Riches do not always bring with them happiness and contentment.

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Wednesday, December 23, 2015

Kwanzaa, what the heck is it?

Kwanzaa what the heck is it


What is Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa is a seven day celebration of family, community, and culture. Kwanzaa is not an African Christmas celebration, Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday, nor is it meant to replace Christmas. The colors of Kwanzaa are black, red and green. Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration that begins on December 26 and ends on January 1. You do not have to be black to celebrate Kwanzaa.




Kwanzaa seven principles are known as the Nguzo Saba. Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa is dedicated to one of seven principles




Kwanzaa what the heck is it



Kwanzaa is a seven-day celebration that begins on December 26 and ends on January 1.  The name Kwanzaa is derived from the Swahili term, "matunda ya kwanza", which means first-fruits, Kwanzaa is based on African harvest celebrations. 

Kwanzaa has seven symbols that represent the values reflective of a peaceable world. What are the seven principles? Kwanzaa has seven principles known as the Nguzo Saba (n-GU-zo SAH-bah). The seven principles of Kwanzaa are unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith.

Kwanzaa seven principles are known as the Nguzo Saba
Kwanzaa seven principles are known as the Nguzo Saba

The colors of Kwanzaa are black, red and green; Black for the people, red for their struggle, and green for the future and success that comes from their struggle.



Dr. Maulana Karenga introduced Kwanzaa in 1966 to the Africans of the American diaspora as a ceremonial celebration to welcome the first fruit harvests in the Americas. Dr. Karenga created Kwanzaa “to introduce and reinforce seven basic values of African culture which contribute to the building and reinforcing of family, community, and culture among African American people as well as Africans throughout the world African community”.

What Kwanzaa is not

  • Kwanzaa is not an African Christmas celebration or a black Christmas.
  • Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday, nor is it meant to replace Christmas.
  • Kwanzaa is not African rather honors African heritage and culture.
  • You do not have to be black to celebrate Kwanzaa as the official Kwanzaa website states, “The principles of Kwanzaa and the message of Kwanzaa has a universal message for all people of good will. It is rooted in African culture, and we speak as Africans must speak, not just to ourselves, but to the world.”


What Kwanzaa is

  • People of many faiths, cultures, and ethnic backgrounds celebrate Kwanzaa.
  • Kwanzaa is a time for all communities to gather together to celebrate ancestry, African culture, future, and past endeavors and virtues.
  • Kwanzaa can be used as a positive force in all communities.
  • Kwanzaa pays respect to our beloved ancestors and to our elders for their wisdom, knowledge, honor and fortitude.


Nguzo Saba


What is Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa seven principles are known as the Nguzo Saba. 

Each of the seven days of Kwanzaa is dedicated to one of the following principles:


Umoja (oo-MO-jah) means Unity ~ To strive for and to maintain unity in the family, community, nation, and race.

Kujichagulia (koo-jee-chah-GOO-lee-ah) means Self-Determination ~ To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves, and speak for ourselves.

Ujima (oo-jah-MAH-ah) means Collective Work and Responsibility ~ To build and maintain our community together and make our brothers' and sisters' problems our problems, and to solve them together.

Ujamaa (koo-OOM-bah) means Cooperative Economics ~ To build and maintain our own stores, shops, and other businesses and to profit from them together.

Nia (NEE-ah) means Purpose ~To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

Kuumba (koo-OOM-bah) means Creativity ~ To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

Imani (ee-MAH-nee) means Faith ~ To believe with all our hearts in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders, and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.

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Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Apricot Chickpea Cake Recipe

High in protein Chickpeas, also known as garbanzo beans are large light brown air friendly beans with a very mild flavor. The major chickpea growing country in Africa is Ethiopia.


Chickpeas are a versatile bean used in many recipes. Apricot Chickpea Cake is an easy unique recipe using canned chickpeas and popular African spices.

Apricot Chickpea Cake Recipe

Apricot Chickpea Cake Recipe
Apricot Chickpea Cake Recipe

Ingredients:
2/3 cup cake flour
1 cup granulated sugar
2 large eggs
2 cups canned chickpeas
¼ cup lemon juice
¼ cup vegetable oil
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon cardamom
1 teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon nutmeg
½ teaspoon salt

Topping:
2 cups apricot preserves
1 cup powdered sugar

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. In a large mixing bowl cream sugar and eggs. Drain the liquid from chickpeas, rinse and pour into a food processor, pulverize the chickpeas, lemon juice, and oil. Add the chickpea mixture to the creamed mixture and mix well. In a separate bowl, mix dry ingredients. Add wet ingredients to dry and mix well. Grease and lightly flour eight inch round cake pan. Bake 30-35 minutes. When cakes cool completely, evenly spread apricots on the top of both cakes then place one cake on top of the other and dust with powdered sugar.

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Sunday, December 20, 2015

African DNA: Mapping Africa Through Genetics

Dr. Sarah Tishkoff is a professor of Genetics and Biology at the University of Pennsylvania studying Africa's genetics. Dr. Tishkoff and her team studied 121 African populations of hunter-gatherers, pastoralists, and farmers. 


There is an extensive amount of ethnic diversity in Africa and genetic evidence is at the moment pointing to East Africa as the cradle of humanity. There is an extensive amount of ethnic diversity in Africa and genetic evidence is at the moment pointing to East Africa as the cradle of humanity. In 1924 the Taung child a fossilized skull of a young child who lived about 2.8 million years ago in Taung, South Africa was discovered. Lucy at 3.2 million years old in November 1974 in the Afar region of Ethiopia was unearthed. 

In 1987, three scientists announced in the journal Nature that they had found a common ancestor to us all, African Eve was a woman who lived in Africa 150,000 years ago. The theory is all people alive today can trace some of their genetic heritage through their mothers back to this one woman. In 2008 another species of Australopithecus, A. sediba was discovered in South Africa, it lived around 2 million years ago.

In 1987, three scientists announced in the journal Nature that they had found a common ancestor to us all, African Eve was a woman who lived in Africa 150,000 years ago.Dr. Sarah Tishkoff is a professor of Genetics and Biology at the University of Pennsylvania studying genetic material variations, human evolution, and disease risk in global populations. 

Since 2001 Dr. Tishkoff studies observable characteristics of ethnically diverse Africans, such as shape, stature, size, color, and behavior that results from the interaction of its genic makeup with the environment. Her studies hope to reveal African history and how genetic variation can show for example why humans have different susceptibility to disease. 

Dr. Tishkoff genetic diversity research can shed light on modern-day diseases, such as diabetes and obesity. Africa also has a high prevalence of several infectious diseases including HIV, malaria, and TB, resulting in millions of deaths per year. DNA samples from around 9,000 geographically and ethnically diverse Africans with distinct diets such as hunter-gatherers, pastoralists, and farmers were collected.  Dr. Tishkoff and her team studied 121 African populations, four African American populations, and 60 non-African populations.
The Khoisan people of Southern Africa was previously thought to possess the oldest DNA lineages, but those of the Sandawe tribe of central Tanzania are older.


The Khoisan people of Southern Africa was previously thought to possess the oldest DNA lineages, but those of the Sandawe tribe of central Tanzania are older. This suggests southern Khoisan originated in East Africa, according to Dr Tishkoff. Modern humans originated in Africa around 200,000 years ago and then spread across the rest of the globe within the past 100,000 years. 

Modern humans have existed continuously in Africa longer than in any other geographic region and have maintained relatively large effective population sizes, resulting in high levels of within-population genetic diversity.

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Saturday, December 19, 2015

Heart Healthy Moroccan Vegetable Tagine Stew Recipe

Heart Healthy Moroccan Vegetable Tagine Stew Recipe

Heart Healthy Moroccan Vegetable Tagine Stew Recipe



One-third of deaths in the United States are caused by forms heart disease according to the American Heart Association. Good nutrition is one way to reduce your risk of developing heart disease and stroke. Making healthy African Moroccan Vegetable Tagine Stew can help you take care of your heart by eating healthy vegetables.


Tagines are primarily used to slow cook stews and vegetable dishes. Because the domed or cone-shaped lid of the tagine traps steam and returns the condensed liquid to the pot, a minimal amount of water is needed when cooking.

Heart Healthy Moroccan Vegetable Tagine Stew Recipe



Heart Healthy Moroccan Vegetable Tagine Stew Recipe

Ingredients:
1 cup fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth
2 large red bell peppers, chopped 
2 large tomatoes, diced 
1 small onion, chopped
2 large carrots, peeled and cut into 1/4" thick planks
1 large potatoes, cut into 1/2" slices or wedges
Handful of red or green olives, rinsed
2 medium garlic cloves, minced
1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
2 teaspoons olive oil


Directions
In a large bowl mix all ingredients by hand omitting the olive oil and broth. Pour enough of the olive oil into the tagine to coat the bottom. Layer the vegetable at the bottom of the tagine, and arrange by cooking times, vegetables that need longer cooking are placed at the bottom of the tagine. Add broth to the tagine, and place over medium heat. 

Use a diffuser if you like, but as long as the heat is kept low, a traditional tagine should be safe on a burner. 

Cover the tagine, and bring the dish to a simmer. Adjust the heat to medium-low or low, checking occasionally to be sure that you can still hear the tagine simmering. Tagine is done when potatoes are fork tender, about 10 minutes. 

You can use a stew pot instead of a tagine; just add an extra 1 cup of broth to the recipe. Serve over cooked rice or couscous.

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Friday, December 18, 2015

Plantain Gingerbread Cake Recipe

Old fashioned gingerbread recipe gets an upgrade thanks to ripe plantains. Plantain Gingerbread is an easy loaf cake recipe made with honey, buttermilk, and five spices.


Honey Plantain Gingerbread Cake Recipe


Honey Plantain Gingerbread Cake Recipe
Honey Plantain Gingerbread Cake Recipe
Ingredients:
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 large eggs
1 stick unsalted butter
1 cup honey
1 cup buttermilk
2 large very ripe plantains
1 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons ground ginger
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground allspice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Combine all ingredients except flour in a large bowl, mix well. Add flour to wet mixture ½ cup at a time mix after each addition. Grease and flour a bread loaf pan. Pour mixture into pan. Bake 50 minutes to an hour, or until toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean. Optional, drizzle with warm honey before serving.

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Wednesday, December 16, 2015

Good and Bad is the Same Proverb

Good and bad is the same proverb from Ghana is one of the valuable traditions that build the fabric of life in Ashanti culture. 



What is bad luck for one man is good luck for another. ~ Ghana proverb

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Tuesday, December 15, 2015

Metaphysical African Amethyst Crystals

Zambia in southern Africa has the highest annual production of amethyst crystallized quartz.  Amethyst has been highly valued by ancient Egyptians for its beauty and strength against the metaphysical seen and unseen world.



Metaphysical African Amethyst Crystals


Powerful African Amethyst CrystalsAmethyst is a bright to dark or dull purple-colored variety of crystallized quartz and a semi-precious stone. Quartz is a crystal that contains very high vibrations through the rock and is therefore one of the most popular crystals that are chosen by people trying to increase their psychic ability. 

The world's largest deposits of amethysts on the African continent are found in Namibia, Zambia, and Morocco. Zambia in southern Africa has the highest annual production of amethyst crystallized quartz. The best, highest quality amethyst is considered the amethyst from Russia. The deeper and more intense is the purple color of the amethyst, the higher is the price and Russian amethyst has the deepest color on earth.

Amethyst is believed to develop spiritual powers as well as having the ability to cleanse the aura and purify your soul. The crystal also guards against drunkenness creating a sober mind. The ancient Egyptians used amethyst as a cut stone to make jewelry for protection against poisonous elements and against the metaphysical seen and unseen world.


Amethyst NecklaceAmethyst is the birthstone for people born in the month of February. Luckily, you do not need to travel to Africa to reap the benefits of African amethyst. You can find African amethyst in most new age bookstores, metaphysical gift shops, as well as online at eBay and Etsy

African amethyst can be placed under your pillow, placed on your fireplace mantel, your living room table or office bookcase. You can also simply carry African amethyst in your pocket, purse, or worn as jewelry to reap the power of the crystal throughout the day. 

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Chocolate Twice Baked African Tea Biscuit Recipe

South African rusks or Karringmelk beskuits are little dried bread squares slightly sweet served with morning tea or coffee in South Africa. South African rusks are typically dunked in coffee or tea before being eaten.



Chocolate Twice Baked African Tea Biscuit RecipeChocolate Karringmelk Beskuits are a yummy twice baked African tea biscuit recipe


Ingredients:
2 cups bread flour
1/3 cup white sugar
2 large eggs
1/2 cup unsweet chocolate chips
3/4 cup buttermilk
1 stick unsalted butter
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Combine the dry ingredients together into a large bowl. Combine all wet ingredients, and add to the dry. You will get a dough that is very like biscuit dough. Roll dough until it is about a half inch thick. Bake on a greased cookie sheet for about 35 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool on cookie sheet 15 minutes. Cut crosswise into 1/2-inch slices. Turn slices cut sides down on cookie sheet. Bake about 15 minutes longer or until crisp and light brown. Remove from cookie sheet to wire rack to cool rusks.

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Monday, December 14, 2015

Why Cat and Rat Hate Each Other African Folklore

African folklore is traditional art and literature passed on through oral communication.  Why the cat and the rat hate each other African Folklore explains why the cat and rat are enemies. 




Why Cat and Rat Hate each other African Folklore
Why Cat and Rat Hate each other African Folklore
As the elders say, one day the Cat, the Rat, the Hawk, and the Eagle arranged to take a journey together, but before starting, they agreed not to argue with each other in any matter.

They had not gone very far when the Eagle saw a bunch of unripe palm-nuts, and said, "When these palm-nuts are ripe, and I have eaten them, then we will proceed on our way."

They waited many days until the palm-nuts ripened and eaten by the Eagle, then they started again, and by and by, the Hawk saw a large savannah, and said, "When the bush in this savannah is burnt, and I have eaten the locusts, then we will go."

Therefore, they waited while the bush dried, and was burnt, and the Hawk ate his locusts. They were ready to start again; but when the Rat saw the bush was burnt, he said, "We remain here until the grass and canes have grown again so that I may eat the young canes, for remember we agreed not to argue or oppose each other on this journey."

They waited there some months until the canes grew again, and the Rat had eaten them. Once more, they started on their travels, and on reaching a large forest the Cat said: "Now I will dry my paws."

His companions answered: "All right, we will go for firewood."

The Rat and the Hawk fetched the wood, and the Eagle went for the fire. The Cat put his paws near the fire, but every time it dried he made it wet again by licking it. They remained a long time in the forest, but the Cat's paws never became properly dry: it was an endless job. His companions became annoyed, and the Hawk and the Eagle flew away, leaving the Rat and the Cat alone. The Cat could not catch the Hawk and Eagle and went back to the fire to dry his paws.


At last the patience of the Rat was exhausted, and he, too, ran away; but the Cat chased him to kill him, and this is the reason why the Cat and the Rat hate each other, he would not wait until the Cat's paws were dry.

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Chic African Culture Featured Articles

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.
Be the good

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

Wise Words


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.