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Saturday, July 4, 2015

Mampoer South African Moonshine

South African Home Distilled Fruit Liquor Mampoer, the South African water of life or South African Moonshine is served wrapped  barbered wire bottles. The ideal alcohol content of mampoer is around 64%.



Mampoer South African MoonshineThe intense tasting home-distilled fruit liquor mampoer comes wrapped in barbered wire and is usually around 55-64% proof. Mampoer can be made from apricots, cherries, figs, oranges, pears, yellow peaches, plums and just about any fruit. The ideal alcohol content is around 64%; only 6-10% of the fermented juice is eventually mampoer. It was illegal to make mampoer however, since 2007, it became possible to create the brew only if made for personal use and not sold.

Legend has it that Mampuru chief of the Pedi people murdered his brother Sekhukuni, chased by the authorities, and gave himself sanctuary under a friend’s tribe who he knew could not refuse to help him due to South African tribal laws. Because of this Mampuru and the chief who was forced to help him, Chief Niabela, were both hung by the authorities and Chief Niabela land divided among Boer bywoners or poor white tenet framers.

Bottle of Mampoer
Bottle of Mampoer
The Boer bywoners had little to no experience with farming however; they did show a skill for making moonshine. The Boer bywoners named their powerful fruit brandy moonshine mampoer after the Mampuru because of his strength and maybe because the Boer bywonders learned the distilling process from the people of Chief Mampuru. The legend of how the popular drink mampour got its name is unclear however, what is clear is the Boer bywonders are known for their homemade brewing skills of fruit brandy, a skill that is celebrated to this very day.


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