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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Msir North African Pickled Lemon Seasoning

Msir or pickled lemon is a popular North African recipe. Dry salting is a traditional method for preserving used for pickling many vegetables and fruits including lemons.



Fresh lemons are washed, sliced covered in salt for 24 hours, then drained and mixed with spices to cook in Tajines. Making Msir is easy and adds a unique flavor to meals. Be careful, just a small amount of the seasoning goes a long way.

Lemon Garlic Chicken by jefferyw
Msir North African Pickled Lemon Seasoning


Ingredients
1/2 cup sea salt
4 large lemons
Water


Directions
Cut 4 slits on equal sides into the lemons, but do not slice all the way through. Pack the sea salt into the lemon segments and pack the lemons as tightly as possible into a quart size mason jar. Fill with water and seal jar properly.

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Friday, May 29, 2015

Kebbi African Green Hot Pepper Sauce

Kebbi African Green Hot Pepper Sauce

Kebbi African Green Hot Pepper Sauce with fish and dill photo by avlxyz
African Recipes by

Kebbi African green hot pepper sauce is a spicy African hot sauce recipe used as a topping for vegetables, French fries, beans, meat seafood, and anything that needs an extra kick.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

 
Kebbi African Green Hot Pepper Sauce

 Ingredients:     

2 minced any type of hot green pepper     

3/4 cup olive oil

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1/4 cup white vinegar

¼ teaspoon salt

1 bunch green onions chopped

1 teaspoon green peppercorns

2 teaspoon ground onion powder


Directions:

Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan over medium-high heat and cook 5 minutes. Pour sauce into prepared heat proof jars and use on seafood, meats, vegetable dishes, beans, French fries and anything that needs an extra kick.

Kebbi African Green Hot Pepper Sauce with fish and dill photo by avlxyz

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Thursday, May 28, 2015

Be Careful Who You Trust African Proverbs

Be careful who you trust African proverbs teaches that sweet and sour walk hand in hand and not everyone that smiles at you is reliable, good, and honest. Choose your friends wisely. 




Be Careful Who You Trust African Proverbs




The lion is a beautiful animal, when seen at a distance - Zulu Proverb



Leopard lying in the grass, be careful who you trust African proverbs photo by Tambako The JaguarOne who defames another's character, also defames their own -Nigerian Proverb


People may tell little lies small as a thorn but, they will grow to the size of a spear and kill you -Yoruba Proverb


The skin of the leopard is beautiful, but not his heart  - Democratic Republic of Congo Proverb


Who created thunder does not fear it  - African Proverb


Hunger makes the big fish come out of hiding in the river  - African Proverb


The lizard had the tree in mind before challenging the dog to a fight. - African Proverb


Hyena on the lying in wait, be careful who you trust African proverbsWar has no eyes  - Swahili Proverb


Eggs and metal do not go in the same basket  - Ewe Proverb


When you see a rat running into a fire then you know that what it is running away from is hotter than the fire  - African Proverb


 
No matter how much you feed a lizard it cannot become a crocodile  - African Proverb


The young of a snake is a snake too  - Swahili proverb

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Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Traditional South African Potato Pudding Recipe

Traditional South African Potato Pudding Recipe

Traditional South African Potato Pudding Recipe photo by onnola
African Recipes by

South African recipe for potato pudding tastes amazing when finished. Make and share this sweet traditional South African potato pudding dessert recipe today.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

 
Traditional South African Potato Pudding Recipe

Ingredients

3 high-starch potatoes such as Russets peeled and diced

4 large eggs

¾ cup sugar

1 cup whole milk

½ cup butter

1 teaspoon nutmeg

½ teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons vanilla

 
Directions

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a 1 1/2-quart baking dish.
In a large pot boil the potatoes, then mash. Add milk, butter, sugar and spices. In a separate bowl whisk eggs and add 1 tablespoon of potato mixture, whisk again then add eggs to potato mixture. Transfer to the baking dish, bake until light brown about 35 minutes.

Traditional South African Potato Pudding Recipe photo by onnola

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Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Epic Gas Shortage in Nigeria

Incumbent Nigerian President Buhari faces a major fuel crisis as he prepares to take office.


Major fuel crisis in Nigeria 2015The companies that import fuel say they haven't been paid by the Nigerian government. Nigeria is about to install a new president on Friday May 29th, in March 2015, former military leader Muhammadu Buhari defeated incumbent Goodluck Jonathan. Buhari’s All Progressives Congress accused outgoing President Goodluck Jonathan of sabotaging the new administration by creating a fuel shortage.  Major fuel marketing companies allege they’re still owed $1 billion in outstanding payments by the outgoing government of President Goodluck Jonathan. Nigeria does not have the capacity to refine enough of its own oil to meet the needs of its nearly 150.5 people.

“Never in the history of our country has any government handed over to another a more distressed country. No electricity, no fuel, workers are on strike, billions are owed to state and federal workers, $60 billion are owed in national debt, and the economy is virtually grounded,” APC spokesman Lai Mohammed, said in a statement Sunday. “The whole scenario reeks of sabotage.”


Nigerian President Buhari Nigeria is Africa’s second largest economy and one of Africa's largest oil producers however, Nigeria depends on fuel imports to meet more than 70 percent of its domestic needs and pays importers to guarantee cheaper local prices. The fuel crisis in Nigeria has grounded airplanes, shut down banks and threatens businesses. South Africa-based multinational mobile telecommunications company, MTN is Africa’s biggest mobile phone company with 61 million customers in Nigeria. MTN stated its running low on fuel reserves and its phone network will be significantly degraded if it doesn’t receive fuel supplies. Fuel in Nigeria is used not just to run cars and transport for goods and services, but also to power generators for homes and businesses; most Nigerians get only a few hours of electricity a day. Nigerians are no strangers to fuel shortages; the country went through similar fuel shortages in 2012.

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Sunday, May 24, 2015

Seafood Green Banana Chutney

Seafood Green Banana Chutney

Seafood Green Banana Chutney
African Recipes by

Chutney is made from a variety of herbs, fruits, vegetables and spices and is part of  Southern African food culture. Green bananas are grown and used all over the African continent; seafood green banana chutney is a unique popular recipe.

 Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Seafood Green Banana Chutney

Ingredients
2 large green bananas
¼ cup balsamic vinegar
1 cup sugar
½ cup grated coconut
6 dates, chopped
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 large tomato, chopped
2 scallions, finely chopped
¼ teaspoon ground cloves
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 cup water

Directions

Chop green bananas, add all ingredients together, stir well and simmer 15 minutes, stirring constantly. Slowly pour chutney into canning jars, cool on counter top. Perfect on seafood.

Seafood Green Banana Chutney


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Saturday, May 23, 2015

Burundi Elections History of Fragile Peace

Many Hutu and Tutsi Burundians are refugees in neighboring countries due to Burundi's Presidential elections protests and demonstrations, coups and fear of another civil war.



Hundreds of thousands of people of Burundi are internally displaced Burundi is located in Central Africa east of Democratic Republic of the Congo and Lake Tanganyika, south of Rwanda, and west and south of Tanzania. In 1959 Tutsi refugees from Rwanda migrate into Ruanda-Urundi however in 1962 Urundi is separated from Ruanda-Urundi and becomes independent kingdom of Burundi. From 1963 to 1994 Tutsis to fled to Burundi due to some of the worst atrocities and lingering resentments leading to massacres of Tutsis throughout Rwanda. By the end of the 1980's some 480,000 Rwandans had become refugees, primarily in Burundi, Uganda, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Tanzania. 

On April 6, 1994, the deaths of the Presidents of Burundi and Rwanda in a plane crash caused by a rocket attack, ignited 100 days of extreme and systematic massacres. The Rwandan genocides, led by the Hutu majority left in its wake at least 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus dead during a 100-day period between April and June 1994. The Rwandan government began the genocide trials at the end of 1996 and continues to this day.
Traveling in Gitega, Burundi photo by Dave ProfferBurundi's first democratically elected president Melchior Ndadaye Frodebu was assassinated in October 1993 after only 100 days in office, triggering widespread ethnic violence between Hutu and Tutsi factions. More than a million Hutu, Tutsi and Burundians perished during the conflict that spanned over 30 years in Burundi. Hundreds of thousands of Burundians were internally displaced or became refugees in neighboring countries. In 2000 the Burundian Government and three Tutsi groups signed a ceasefire agreement, but two main Hutu groups refuse to acknowledge the agreement. In 2004, United Nations forces take over peacekeeping duties from African Union troops.


In 2005 the 12 year civil war officially ended and a new Burundi constitution was instated electing a majority Hutu government. President Pierre Nkurunziza, who was reelected in 2010 and is running for a controversial third term on June 26, 2015 stands firm on his decision amid protests, demonstrations, coups and thousands of people fleeing  Burundi for fear of a second civil war.

The ethnic groups in Burundi are Hutu 85%, Tutsi 14%, and Twa and other 1%.
Burundi's parliamentary election was not free, fair, transparent or credible and violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms were committed, the United Nations said on Thursday July 2, 2015. The United Nations Electoral Observation Mission in Burundi (MENUB) officially started its operations in Burundi on January 1, 2015, as mandated in Security Council resolution 2137 of 2014. The Mission was set up at the request of the Government of Burundi and will report on the electoral process in the country which will organize five polls in a four-month period between May and September. The first MENUB observation of Burundi was found to be “not free, fair, transparent or credible and violations of human rights and fundamental freedoms were committed”, on Thursday July 2, 2015.

The majority of Burundi’s 10.5 million people are Hutu, who are traditionally farmers. The Tutsi historically controlled the army and the economy. The ethnic groups in Burundi are Hutu 85 percent, Tutsi 14 percent, and Twa and other 1 percent.

Over 45 percent of the population is under the age of 14, the median age is 17; Burundi is the 2nd poorest country in the world and around 81 percent live below the poverty line. The main cash crop of Burundi is coffee, which accounts for over 80 percent of exports.

At about 206 persons per sq. km, Burundi has the 2nd largest population density in Sub-Saharan Africa. Nearly 70 percent of Burundi’s population lives in its capital city Bujumbura, Tutsis generally occupied the higher strata in the social system and the Hutus the lower. Thousands of Burundian refugees at various times have crossed into Rwanda, Tanzania, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Uganda.

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Thursday, May 21, 2015

Chadian Steamed Honey Cassava Buns

Chadian Steamed Honey Cassava Buns

Chadian Steamed Honey Cassava Buns
African Recipes by

Chadian steamed honey cassava bun recipe has as many variations as to the fillings and the preparations. Our recipe offers a tasty filling of sweet honey to compliment the delicate soft steamed buns.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:


Ingredients

2 cups cassava flour

½ cup water

¼ cup honey

½ teaspoon salt

Honey for drizzling


Directions
Mix together cassava flour, water and salt. Knead until dough is formed then divide into 10 equal balls. Using your thumb make a deep indication in the center of each ball, fill with honey and smooth the dough back over the filling. Place squares of parchment paper under each ball so the dough does not stick to the steamer, steam in a bamboo steamer for 25 minutes. Drizzle with honey and serve warm as a snack, appetizer or with meals.

Chadian Steamed Honey Cassava Buns Recipe

Chad Food Recipes

Chad iconic steamed cassava buns are a traditional food recipe made throughout Chad homes. Cassava also known as manioc and tapioca is a major crop for food and moneymaking produce for the rural community of the Southern of Chad.
Chadian Steamed Honey Cassava Buns
Did you know?
The many ethnic groups of Chad are the Sara (Ngambaye/Sara/Madjingaye/Mbaye) 29.9 percent, Kanembu/Bornu/Buduma 9.7 percent, Arab 9.6 percent, Wadai/Maba/Masalit/Mimi 7.5 percent, Gorane 5.8 percent, Masa/Musseye/Musgum 4.9 percent, Marba/Lele/Mesme 3.7 percent, Bulala/Medogo/Kuka 3.6 percent, Bidiyo/Migaama/Kenga/Dangleat 2.6 percent, Dadjo/Kibet/Muro 2.5 percent, Mundang 2.5 percent, Tupuri/Kera 2.1 percent, Gabri/Kabalaye/Nanchere/Somrai 2 percent, Fulani/Fulbe/Bodore 1.9 percent, Karo/Zime/Peve 1.3 percent, Zaghawa/Bideyat/Kobe 1.1 percent, Tama/Assongori/Mararit 1.1 percent, Baguirmi/Barma 1.1 percent, Mesmedje/Massalat/Kadjakse 0.8 percent, other Chadian ethnicities 3.2 percent, Chadians of foreign ethnicities 0.9 percent, foreign nationals 0.4 percent, unspecified 1.7 percent.

Cooking in Chad

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Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Prosecuting Criminals for the 1994 Rwandan Genocide

Prosecuting Criminals for the 1994 Rwandan Genocide

Rwandan genocide
International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda was established by the United Nations Security Council to prosecute those responsible for the 1994 Rwandan genocide.

Prosecuting Criminals for the 1994 Rwandan Genocide


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Since its inception, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda or ICTR indicted 93 individuals for genocide and other serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in Rwanda 1994.



In 1959 Tutsi refugees from Rwanda migrate into Ruanda-Urundi however in 1962 Urundi is separated from Ruanda-Urundi and becomes independent kingdom of Burundi. From 1963 to 1994 Tutsis to fled to Burundi due to some of the worst atrocities and lingering resentments leading to massacres of Tutsis throughout Rwanda.

Rwanda Genocide Memorial one of six mass graves.Paul Rusesabagina, a hotel manager in Kigali Rwanda housed Tutsi refugees during their fight against the Hutu militia during a 100-day period between April and June 1994 in Rwanda. The Rwandan genocides, led by the Hutu majority to control Rwanda left in its wake at least 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus dead.

The International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda has six cases still waiting for trial including Bernard Munyagishari, a former Interahamwe and National Republican Movement for Democracy and Development Hutu militia leader. He was arrested as being the Rwandan genocide mastermind. Munyagishari was arrested in May 2011 in Kachanga, North Kivu of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as of May 2015 the trial has not begun in Rwanda.

According to International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda , of the 90 persons indicted, 9 remain at large with a 5 million dollar reward. Félicien Kabuga, Protais Mpiranya, Augustin Bizimana, Fulgence Kayishema, Charles Sikubwabo (no photo), Ladislas Ntaganzwa, Aloys Ndimbati, Ryandikayo (no photo), and Phénéas Munyarugarama.


Results for prosecuting criminals for the 1994 Rwandan Genocide; the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda concluded proceedings for 78 accused of the 1994 Rwandan genocide including 4 transferred to other jurisdictions.


32 - Transferred to a State to serve sentence

7 - Awaiting transfer to a State to serve their sentence

14 - Have served their sentence

3 - Died before or while serving their sentence

14 - Acquitted and released

2 - Indictments withdrawn

2 - Died before judgement

4 - Transferred to other jurisdictions: Rwanda (2) and France (2)


If you know any of the wanted for the 1994 Rwandan genocide Email: UNMICTTRACKING@UN.ORG Tel.: +250 78830 1539 / +250 78830 1543 / +250 78830 2627


Wanted for Rwandan 1994 GenocideUpdate: Ladislas Ntaganzwa was arrested December 2015 in the Democratic Republic of Congo, eight are still at large even though the Rwandan genocide International Criminal Tribunal begun to downsize its activities and staff in compliance with the Completion Strategy in 2015.
As provided in Security Council resolution 977 of February 22, 1995, the Rwandan genocide International Criminal Tribunal is headquartered in Arusha, Tanzania, with additional offices located in Kigali, New York and The Hague. The Chambers consisted of 16 permanent judges and 9 ad litem judges, all chosen by the United Nations General Assembly.

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Tuesday, May 19, 2015

African Folktale | How the moon and the stars came to be


How the moon and the stars came to be
 
African Folktale: How the moon and the stars came to be by pounding rice photo by Willem Heerbaart
One day in the times when the sky was close to the ground a young woman went out to pound rice. Before she began her work, she took off her beads from around her neck and a comb from her hair, and hung them on the sky.

Then she began working, and each time that she raised her pestle into the air, it struck the sky. For some time she pounded the rice, and then she raised the pestle so high that it struck the sky very hard.

Immediately the sky began to rise and it went up so far that she lost her comb and beads. Never did they come down, for the comb became the moon and the beads are the stars that are scattered about the sky.

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Monday, May 18, 2015

African Immigrants are a Lucrative Business

Money, Human Smugglers and African immigrants Money, Human Smugglers and African immigrants
By Chic African Culture Press Writer
Rwanda, Africa
Monday May 18 2015 12:05 ET



African illegal immigrants are a lucrative business bringing billions of dollars to governments, business, human smugglers and individuals.
 Men, women and children line up on a Somalia beach to board the boats that will take them across the Gulf of Aden to Yemen.

African Immigrants are a Lucrative Business


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




April 2015, Rwandan President Paul Kagame confirmed a multimillion dollar deal with Israel to host its Eritrean and Sudanese African illegal immigrants transported by human smugglers.


African illegal immigrants are a lucrative business



More than 1,800 people are feared to have died crossing the Mediterranean in 2015 so far - a 20-fold increase on the same period in 2014. Italy received more than 170,000 of the 2014 arrivals, large numbers of which were from Syria and Eritrea.

Egypt's ambassador to the United Kingdom warned of boats full of terrorists if the international community does not act against human smugglers, while the Italian government has expressed fears of militants infiltrating the boats, while emphasizing that the boats are a humanitarian crisis. However, experts have cautioned that it is difficult to verify the threat without evidence.

Israel is set to deport Eritrean and Sudanese asylum-seekers estimated to be over 50,000 to countries in Africa including Rwanda and Uganda under a new policy which has been greatly criticized by human rights defenders. Rwandan President Paul Kagame said that Israel planned to return the immigrants to their countries of origin but some refused citing danger to their lives.

About 60,000 people are estimated to have tried to cross the Mediterranean this year with the aid of human smugglers, fleeing conflict and poverty. Since the 2011 uprising, Libya has been without a stable government, and the chaos has allowed human smuggling trafficking networks to thrive.

Ikenna Azuike hosts What’s Up Africa a show produced by RNW. Nearly 50,000 Eritrean and Sudanese asylum-seekers are in Israel, video blog satirist Ikenna Azuike humorously points out the irony that huge amounts of money are being made from their plight and not just from people traffickers.









Did you know?
How much do smugglers charge? Africa's people smugglers charge $200 - $700 per person; the average amount earned a year in sub-saharan Africa is around $760 per year.

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Saturday, May 16, 2015

Funny African Proverbs That Will Put a Smile on Your Face

Funny African Proverbs That Will Put a Smile on Your Face

Funny African Proverbs
African proverbs are wise and levelheaded sayings and some are very funny putting a smile on your face.

Funny African Proverbs That Will Put a Smile on Your Face



Considered the cradle of humanity and the origin of humankind, Africa has 54 countries and 9 territories and funny African Proverbs that will bring a smile to your face.




Funny memorable African Proverbs


Country Proverb
South African Proverb Manure does not turn into chocolate.
Mozambique Proverb Dress up a stick and you get a doll.
Zambian Proverb The one who suffers from diarrhea is the one that fights with the door at night.
Igbo Proverb You should never spit in your own well, you might come back for a drink.
African Proverb The mosquito that perches on the scrotum must be chased away with caution.
African Proverb Man cannot live by bread alone, which is correct, but man can also not live without bread.
African Proverb A blind man already has his foot on the stone he threatens to throw at you.
Moroccan Proverb An onion shared with a friend tastes like roast lamb.
Ethiopian Proverb Believe the liar up to the door of his house and no further than that.




You cannot stop a pig from wallowing in the mud. - African Proverb

Maasai villagers in traditional clothing and jewelry in the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania


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Friday, May 15, 2015

Sweet African Spinach Smoothie

African spinach grows throughout sub-Saharan Africa, in Southern Africa it's known as Imfino, the Congo as Fumbwa and as Morogo in various other African countries.  


Sweet African Spinach Smoothie Recipe

Sweet African Spinach Smoothie Recipe
African Recipes by

Sweet African Spinach Smoothie recipe mixes wild African spinach with sweet fruits to create a healthy delicious green smoothie. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:


Ingredients
2 handfuls of wild African spinach or common spinach
1 very ripe banana
1 cup mango juice
1 tablespoon honey
1 small piece fresh ginger
10 ice cubes

Directions

Add all ingredients into a blender and blend until smooth. You can add 2 tablespoons of low-fat yogurt to the recipe if desired.

Sweet African Spinach Smoothie Recipe



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Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Peace in Darfur Through Athletics

Sports promote peace in Darfur acting as a universal language bringing people together. 

Sports for peace photo by John Mitchell

Athletics is a great tool to promote ideals of peace, fraternity, solidarity, non-violence, tolerance and justice. Athletics have long been recognized as an instrument for promoting peace tackling problems in post conflict situations ease as sports has the ability to bring people together.

The United Nations Mission in Darfur hosted an outreach event in the El Sereif locality of North Darfur in western Sudan designed to serve as a bridge to foster interaction and prevent tribal division. Thousands of El Sereif residents, many of whom were displaced from clashes that took place in early 2013 in and around Jebel Amir, turned out for the festivities, which included speeches, cultural performances, soccer and football matches, volleyball tournaments and horse races.

“Athletics helps us in spreading messages of peace, driving social change and meeting the Millennium Development Goals,” said United Nations Security-General Ban Ki-moon. Mr. Abdusamad Suleiman Marji, Secretary of the locality’s Youth, Culture and Sports Ministry, said that such events help drive out sadness and inspire community harmony. “This is an event that has allowed all of us to at least feel happy,” said Ms. Thuryia Ismail, a women’s group representative living in El Sereif, echoing the sentiments expressed by Mr. Marji.




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Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Africa Bushmeat Hunter ▒ Bushmeat Trade ▒ Bushmeat Conservation

Majority of the bushmeat harvested in the Congo Basin consists of porcupine, pouched rat, and small antelopes. Monkeys are hunted in large numbers in some areas, but they represent a small percentage of bushmeat.

Africa Bushmeat Hunter Bushmeat Trade Bushmeat Conservation

Bushmeat Hunter ▒ Bushmeat Trade ▒ Bushmeat Conservation

Eating Bushmeat in Africa



Congo Basin porcupineIn rural areas of the Congo basin around 70 percent of the inhabitants depend on bushmeat for their protein intake since there is no livestock in the 3.7 million square kilometers or 1.4 million square miles Congo basin. Also referred to as earth's 2nd lungs, due to its size, much is still unknown about the Congo basin. 


The Congo basin is the 2nd largest rainforest in the world covering seven African countries, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Congo Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea and small areas of Nigeria and Angola with about half lying within the Democratic Republic of CongoBushmeat is very important to the lives of millions living in the Congo basin.



Africa’s Congo Basin Bushmeat issue from four different perspectives



Bushmeat Hunter Tamanga Ekwayoli

Armed with a long spear, a machete, and a wire for setting traps, Tamanga Ekwayoli is chasing wildlife. According to CIFOR, Ekwayoli lives in a village bordering the Lac Tumba-Lediima Forest Reserve near Lukolela in the Democratic Republic of Congo, DRC. 

He has been hunting for most of his life. “I love hunting because I can earn money quickly, if God helps me today, I can catch some animals, like monkeys, wild boar or antelopes. If I catch 4 or 5 animals, I sell some and keep some for my family. If the catch is not much, I keep it for my family.” But too often, he says, he doesn't have any surplus. “When I started hunting, there were a lot of animals, I used to catch more monkeys, wild boar, porcupine, chimpanzee and antelopes to sell in the village. These are the types of animals villagers prefer, but they are becoming harder and harder to find.”


Bushmeat Trader Jeanne Mwakembe

Women selling bushmeat at a market photo by Ollivier Girard CIFORJeanne Mwakembe sells bushmeat at the Moutuka Nunene market in Lukolela village in the DRC. According to CIFOR Mwakembe says “We source our animals from hunters who have been in the forest. 

In these forests, there are crocodiles, monkeys, antelopes, squirrels, porcupines and sometimes, we get elephants. In our village, a lot of people eat bush meat, but the prized animals are getting rarer. With just two animals, one can make a lot of money, but now, sometimes I travel for two days, leaving my husband and children at home, and I still come back empty handed, we are very worried.”


Bushmeat Conservationist Jean Mapima

Mapima has spent nearly 30 years in conservation and is the Chief Administrator of the Lac Tumba-Lediima Forest Reserve. According to CIFOR, Mapima says there’s been an increase in the amount of hunting in and around the reserve, “Traditionally, hunting was done mainly for subsistence, for family consumption. However, people are increasingly engaging in commercial hunting, which is progressing fast. 

Commercial hunting’s can be traced back to poverty, to lack of other means of livelihood for the population. That’s why the people are hunting, to buy medication for the children, to buy clothing. However, we stand the risk of the extinction of some species". Mapima’s tough stance has not endeared his team to the surrounding population. The forest guards face the threat of violence from villagers angry about the restrictions, and access to food has become a problem.


Centre for International Forestry Research  Bushmeat Scientist Robert Nasi

Robert Nasi, a scientist with the Centre for International Forestry Research (CIFOR), says bushmeat hunting in the DRC and across the Congo Basin is becoming increasingly unsustainable. “The main trends have been an increase in the amount of animals caught, mainly linked to the increase in population in the region,” he said. 


“There is clearly an over-harvesting in some places, so we can say that it is unsustainable.” This has consequences for both people and the environment, he says. “If the resource disappears, people will not be able to hunt and there will be a food shortage, there will be a protein gap somewhere. And secondly, many of the animals that are hunted have a significant role in seed dispersal, seed removal, so that that may trigger some change in the long term in the type of forest.” 

According to CIFOR, Nasi suggests one solution would be to ban hunting of vulnerable species the gorillas and elephants while allowing people to hunt more resilient species, like small antelopes and porcupines. “As long as there is someone willing to buy, people will hunt, that’s what you see with any illegal trade.”

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Chic African Culture Featured Articles

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.
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A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.