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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Thursday, April 30, 2015

Ginger Beer Grilled Chicken Marinade

Ginger Beer Grilled Chicken Marinade

Ginger Beer Grilled Chicken Marinade photo by avlxyz
African Recipes by

Ginger beer is widely home-brewed and consumed throughout Africa. Ginger beer makes a unique flavorsome marinade for ginger beer grilled chicken recipe. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients

1 tablespoon ginger powder
1 tablespoon lemon juice
¼ cup brown sugar
1 teaspoon garlic salt
2 teaspoons onion salt
2 cups water

Directions 

Add all ingredients to a large pot, mix well and simmer 10 minutes. Allow mixture to cool and marinate chicken in a sealed plastic bag at least 8 hours in the refrigerator. After marinating grill, bake or fry chicken for a unique delicious taste. 

Ginger Beer Grilled Chicken Marinade photo by avlxyz

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Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Zambian Coconut Milk Rice Porridge

Zambian Coconut Milk Rice Porridge Recipe

Coconut Milk Rice Porridge Recipe photo by Vegan Feast Catering
African Recipes by

Delightful and easy homemade coconut milk rice porridge African recipe deliciously reuses your left over rice for breakfast. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients
1 cup cooked rice
¼ cup unsalted roasted peanuts, chopped
2 tablespoons smooth peanut butter
2 tablespoons honey
1 teaspoon cinnamon (optional)
1 cup coconut milk

Directions

In a medium saucepan over medium heat add milk, honey and peanut butter mixing well. Stir in rice and peanuts, top with your favorite fruit and serve warm. 

Zambia Africa roadside vendors by strings bass davie


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Tuesday, April 28, 2015

African Music Mix: FEMUA African Music Festival

Freshlyground and Meta and Cornerstones performed to the delight of the 2015 FEMUA African Music Festival crowd. 


Freshlyground is an award winning South African band In April 2015 over a period of three days, Festival of Urban Music Anoumabo or FEMUA music festival theme of integration and understanding played live to millions of people across the world. The social and sports event was initiated by musician Salif Traoré in 2008. While providing enjoyment to millions of people, FEMUA primary goal is to improve health, education and business opportunities for needy folks in Côte d’Ivoire. Salif Traoré is UNESCO’s Goodwill Ambassador and lead singer of the band Magic System.

Meta Dia of Meta and Cornerstones
FEMUA music festival hosted 13 artists from Africa, France and the United States. Two artists, Freshlyground and Meta and Cornerstones performed to the delight of the crowd. Freshlyground is a South African band that formed in Cape Town in 2002 and is made up of seven diverse musicians from South Africa, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. Senegalese Meta Dia of Meta and Cornerstones began his musical career in Senegal and then the United States weaving French, English, Wolof, and Fulani in his African Reggae music.

Birds sing not because they have the answers but because they have songs in their hearts
- African Proverb

Award winning South African band Freshlyground music video 
Fire Is Low


Meta Dia of Meta and Cornerstones music video
 Anywhere For Love


Those who understand music understand the world.
- African Proverb

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Monday, April 27, 2015

Why Hyenas Have Hind Legs Shorter Than Their Front African Folktale

Hyenas have hind legs shorter than their front legs, this popular Zulu African Folktale explains what happened to Hyenas legs.


Wolf and Hyena were together when a white cloud floated by high in the sky. Wolf jumped up, landed upon it, and ate of the cloud as if it were fresh meat.

Why Hyenas Have Hind Legs Shorter Than Their Front African Folktale photo by danheap77When wolf had his fill of the white cloud, he said to Hyena, "My cousin, I am ready to come down, if you catch me I will bring you a piece of the cloud for you to taste!" 

So Hyena caught him, and broke his fall. The cloud wolf gave her was so delicious she wanted more; she jumped up on top of a white cloud and ate until she was full. 

She told wolf, “Catch me and I’ll bring a piece of cloud for us to eat later as a snack my wolf cousin, now catch me as well." The scoundrel wolf said to hyena, "My cousin trust me, I will catch you, jump down now!"

Wolf held up his hands, and hyena jumped down from the cloud, and when she was near, Wolf started jumping around yelling, "My cousin, do not be mad at me. Ouch! Help! A thorn has pricked my foot and is hurting me!" 

As a result, hyena fell down from the white cloud above, and landed with her two back legs on the ground. Since that day, Hyenas have hind legs are shorter than their front legs.

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Sunday, April 26, 2015

Friendly Fire: West African Pepper Wing Sauce Recipe

Friendly Fire West African Pepper Wing Sauce


African Recipes by

West African pepper fruits and leaves are used as seasonings in West African pepper wing sauce for their strong blistering peppery taste. West African hot peppers are also a delicacy chewed fresh from the plant to extract the delicious spicy flavor. 

Prep time: Cook time: 2 Total time: 4

Ingredients:    
1 minced piri piri pepper or any type of hot pepper
3 dried crushed pepper leaves   
3/4 cup olive oil
1 teaspoon brown sugar
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1/4 cup apple cider vinegar
1 tablespoon crushed red pepper flake
¼ teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground paprika
1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1 teaspoon ground cayenne
1 teaspoon ground habanero chili powder
  
Directions:
Combine all ingredients in a sauce pan over medium-high heat and simmer 20 minutes. Pour sauce into prepared heat proof jars and use on grilled fish, or as a chicken wing sauce.

Friendly Fire West African Pepper Wing Sauce Recipe












Did you know...?
Bim’s Kitchen makes tasty hand-made African-inspired sauces and condiments delivered to your doorstep. 

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Saturday, April 25, 2015

Impundulu the Lighting Bird Tale of Chaos Africa Myth Story

Africa myth story of the origins of rain, lightning, chaos

Origins of rain, lightning, chaos
African myth of Impundulu the lighting bird, takes the true life form of the hammerkop, eagle and secretary birds in order to answer the origins of rain, lightning and chaos in the Venda culture.

The Venda, also known as Vhavenda are a Southern African people living mostly in Thohoyandou near the South Africa Zimbabwe border.

Africa myth story of the origins of rain, lightning, chaos


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




The Venda, also known as Vhavenda are a Southern African people living mostly in Thohoyandou near the South Africa Zimbabwe border. As in most cultures around the world, fire and water hold a special fascination with the Venda people and the Venda can conjure up ancestral spirits to assist with early matters.

African Mythological Monster, Impundulu the Lighting Bird
According to Siyabona Africa, Venda believe zwidutwane water spirits live at the bottom of waterfalls. 

These beings are only half-visible; they only have one eye, one leg, and one arm. One half can be seen in this world and the other half in the spirit world. The Venda would take offerings of food to them because the zwidutwane cannot grow things underwater.
As in most cultures around the world, fire and water hold a special fascination with the Venda people and the Venda can conjure up ancestral spirits to assist with early matters.
Khokhovula is a traditional healer or Inyanga, Sangoma practicing in Siloam Nzhelele Limpopo Province South Africa. He states Impundulu, Mpundulu or rain bird is known as Ndadzi and Mheni, was historically used by the Venda people in battle striking their enemies and their enemies livestock with lighting bolts. 

The Zimbabwe Ndebele people call Impundulu the lighting bird, Inyoni yezulu. Khokhovula also says it was a law that if the impundulu bird was found dead on the ground, it must be reported to the community elders immediately before wicked people steal its powers. 

It is said that impundulu the rain bird may connect with the heat of the sun and possess an infinite heat of which people with negative powers mostly witches use to create a sun stroke and the lightning bolt. 

Impundulu the hammerkop, eagle and secretary bird of lightning.Depending on the tribe and culture, some believe the hammerkop, secretary bird or eagle is the lightning bird or impundulu. Many superstitions revolve around these birds, harming its nests could bring about death, harming its eggs causes sickness and disease and if the birds fly over your house at night and calls out, a death in the home will soon follow. 

A magic potion using the lighting birds’ feathers will cause rain to stop or start. According to Khokhovula, if you want to intimidate someone by threatening a lighting bolt to cause havoc by impundulu the rain bird, you would say “Ngizokuyela eVenda ngiyokufunela umbane” meaning I will go to Venda to fetch the lightning to strike you. 

Did you know?
Sangoma is a Southern African traditional healer fulfilling many roles in the community as a leader, seeing into the future, and assisting with physical, emotional and spiritual healings.

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Friday, April 24, 2015

West Africa Green Banana Fish Stew Recipe

West Africa Green Banana Fish Stew Recipe


African Recipes by

Favors of West African green banana fish stew deliciously blend together creating a tasty easy African seafood recipe. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients
2 fresh white fish filets
4 green bananas, sliced
1/2 cup peanuts, chopped
2 large tomatoes, sliced
1 bunch green onions, chopped
1 onion, chopped
1 hot pepper
1 tablespoon lemon juice
2 cups vegetable stock
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

Add all ingredients to a large pot and simmer 20 minutes. Serve over rice. 

Selling green bananas in Cameroon Africa photo by elin b
















Did you know...?
Green bananas or unripe yellow bananas have a flesh firm flesh and starchy taste making them a delicious alternative to potatoes.

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Thursday, April 23, 2015

Had a Bad Day? African Proverbs to Help Soothe Your Soul

African Proverbs to calm your restless spirit when you've had a bad day.



Nelson Mandela smiled on the outside and insideThose who want rain must also accept the mud. - Ghanaian proverb


Smooth seas do not make skillful sailors. - Malawi proverb


Those who want peace make their own peace. - Zambian proverb


Africa Seychelles St-Pierre Islet photo by Didier BaertschigerIf you think you are too small to make a difference try sleeping in a room with a pesky Mosquito - African Proverb


The sun does not forget a village just because it is small. - Mali proverb


However long the night, the dawn will break.  - African Proverb


The best bed a person can sleep on is peace. - Somali proverb


Good friends photo by Georgie PauwelsCutting off the head is not the cure for a headache. - Yoruba proverb


Return to old watering holes for more than water; friends and dreams are there to meet you. - African proverb

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Wednesday, April 22, 2015

African Ginger Peanut Chicken Salad Recipe

African Ginger Peanut Chicken Salad Recipe

African Ginger Peanut Chicken Salad Recipe
African Recipes by

Unique African ginger peanut chicken salad recipe is made with chopped peanuts, ginger, and apricot jam. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients
2 cups chopped cooked chicken
¼ cup chopped unsalted roasted peanuts
1 teaspoon ground ginger
½ teaspoon onion salt
2 tablespoons apricot jam
¼ cup mayonnaise
¼ cup chopped green onions
Salt pepper to taste

Directions

In a large bowl add mayo, jam and spices mixing well. Add remaining ingredients and serve as a unique summer salad to family and friends with a side of fruit. 

African Ginger Peanut Chicken Salad Recipe







Did you know...?
You can also mix in African Groundnut Powder Spice into the African Ginger Peanut Chicken Salad recipe for added flavor.

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Tuesday, April 21, 2015

African Folktale How the Wasp Ate Tokoloshe

African Folktale How the Wasp ate Tokoloshe
Tokoloshe is a Zulu hypersexual demon that has the power to cause illness and even death.

African Folktale How the Wasp ate Tokoloshe


1 - 2 tokoloshe coming for you, 3 - 4 better lock the door.



Tokoloshe is an evil spirit who is mischievous and feared by some Southern Africans especially in the Zulu culture
Tokoloshe 



African Folktale How the Wasp Ate Tokoloshe



The King gave permission for the grass to be burned in a small village where a young beautiful girl named Aminata lived. The King warned the villagers not to dig any holes because tokoloshe evil spirits live underground. 


Disobedient Aminata started digging a hole because she did not believe the King and elders of her village that tokoloshe actually existed, besides, she was too beautiful for an evil spirit to want to harm someone so lovely. 


As Aminata was digging holes to plant beautiful flowers, an evil tokoloshe popped its head out of the hole yelling, “The chief has set fire to the bush; whosoever has dug this hole has set me free, and now I am free marry the most beautiful girl in the village to have my children!”   


Suddenly the evil tokoloshe leap on Aminata but she ran away and came across a wasp calmly weaving cloth with magical thread. The wasp said, “Where are you going in such a hurry beautiful Aminata?”  Aminata said, “Tokoloshe is chasing me and wants me to have his children!” The wasp said, “Sit here on top of this latter until the tokoloshe comes.” 


Aminata sat down and tried to hide but sure enough the evil tokoloshe saw the beautiful Aminata and pounced on her; but the wasp flew down and swallowed the tokoloshe whole. The wasp lifted up a single strand of thread, gave it to Aminata, and said she must tie it round his middle quickly. 


She quickly wrapped the thread around the wasp’s waist so tightly; the wasps’ waist was almost cut in two. That is why the wasp's waist is small and his belly is big, the tight thread wrapped by Aminata inside traps an evil tokoloshe.





Did you know?
Tokoloshe is an evil spirit who is mischievous and feared by some Southern Africans especially in the Zulu culture just as the candyman or bogeyman is feared in the USA. Witchdoctors, Sangoma, Nyanga and Traditional Healers are able to get rid of Tokoloshes.

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Monday, April 20, 2015

African Pantry Essential | Gabon Chocolate | Dika Paste | Ogbono seeds

When you want to thicken African soups and sauces, there are many ingredients. African bush mango seed is made up of nearly 65% oil, the seed is really more oil than seed. Gabon chocolate, dika paste bread or Ogbono seeds are pounded to a chocolate buttery paste as an African pantry essential ingredient used in thickening and flavoring African soup and sauce recipes.


African Gabon Chocolate, Dika Paste, Ogbono seeds Recipe

Gabon chocolate also known as dika paste bread photo by Center for International Forestry Research
African Recipes by

Gabon chocolate, dika paste bread or Ogbono seeds are ground into a chocolate butter like paste to thicken African soups and sauces. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:


Ingredients

½ cup African mango dried seeds


Directions

Add all ingredients to a coffee grinder and pulse until mixed well into a paste. Store refrigerated in plastic wrap (treat like butter). Leftover seeds may be stored at room temperature for up to 8 months.


Ogbono from the African bush mango seed is made up of nearly 65% oil

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Sunday, April 19, 2015

Beautiful Bamboo Forests of Ethiopia

Beautiful Bamboo Forests of Ethiopia

Bamboo Forests
Over 1 million hectares or around 2.5 million acres of bamboo are growing wild in Ethiopian forests, that's 7 percent of the world's bamboo resources growing wild in Africa.

Beautiful Bamboo Forests of Ethiopia

Beautiful Bamboo Forests of Ethiopia


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




When you think of Bamboo, does Africa come to mind? Bamboo grows throughout Africa in South Africa, Ethiopia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Burundi, Cameroon, Rwanda, DR Congo, Malawi and Zambia. Bamboo is one of Ethiopia's most under-utilized resources.


Currently there are over 1 million hectares or around 2.5 million acres of bamboo growing wild in Ethiopian forests. Ethiopia has Africa's largest bamboo forest.

Bamboo Forests of Ethiopia.Ethiopia’s Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development stated to news agencies that there were no formal bamboo economies in Ethiopia until 2013 with an award going to the African Bamboo company for the Biomass-Powered Thermal Processing of Ethiopian Bamboo. African Bamboo is a forestry, wood, and bio-energy company located in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Two species of bamboo occur naturally in Ethiopia, Shimel and Kerekeha. Lowland bamboo is known locally as Shimel and makes up about 80 percent of the Ethiopia’s bamboo forest resources. 
Mountain gorillas eat bamboo in Sub-Saharan Africa
Shimel grows in western Ethiopia near the Sudanese border. Highland bamboo, or Kerekeha, grows in the rainy highlands of Northwestern and Southern Ethiopia and makes up 6.5 percent of total forest cover in Ethiopia. The remaining 13.5 percent of forest bamboo is varied with numerous species.


Bamboos are some of the strongest and fastest-growing plants in the world. In comparison to soft wood trees that can take 30 years to reach maturity, bamboo is a fully mature resource after three years, making it commercially and environmentally sustainable. 
Sub-Saharan Africa has three million hectares of bamboo forest.
Africa below the Sahara desert has three million hectares of bamboo forest, around four percent of the continent’s total forest cover. 

Ethiopia plans to increase its bamboo cover to two million hectares over the next five years.


Did you know?
Ethiopia the second most populous country in Africa.

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Saturday, April 18, 2015

Top Five Golf Courses in Kenya

Top Five Golf Courses in Kenya
Comprehensive guide to Kenya Africa best golf courses

Top Five Golf Courses in Kenya


Kenya has 42 golf courses from the coast of the Indian Ocean to the Great Rift Valley and central highlands. Kenya’s first golf course, Nairobi golf club, now the Royal Nairobi golf club, opened in 1906.



Top Five Golf Courses in Kenya



According to Kenya Golf Guide Kenya’s first golf course, Nairobi golf club, now the Royal Nairobi golf club, opened in 1906. Two golf courses opened four year later, the Meru Club and the Nyeri Club were opened in 1910. Mombasa Golf Club was opened shortly after in 1911. Kenya golf scene is very popular. Kenya has a total of 42 golf courses, more than any other African Country except South Africa; at least eight courses have hosted major tournaments and are considered to be of international standard. The best time to visit Kenya for a few rounds of golf is during the rainy season, in the months of March - early June and October - early December. 

Africa Zone 6 is Africa’s most prestigious amateur golf team title, for 2015 the 20th edition of the tournament is hosted by Uganda. The defending champions, South Africa are competing against amateur golfers from Kenya, Botswana, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe.

Top Five Golf Courses in Kenya:

1.   Vipingo Ridge 18-hole, par 72 Baobab golf course is an hour north of Mombasa. Vipingo Ridge is a 2,500 acre private residential golfing destination on the beautiful Mombasa North Coast. Vipingo Ridge has an outstanding Clubhouse with an 18-hole championship golf course, Beach Club and a Private Airstrip.

2.   Sigona 18-hole, par 72 golf course is located in Kikuyu, along the Nairobi Naivasha highway, the club is a twenty minutes drive from Nairobi. Constructed in 1938, Sigona Golf Club boasts an 18-hole, country style golf course, the toughest hole in this course is hole number seven.
Kenya golf Amateur Joseph Waweru Karanja of Golf Park
3.   The 18 holes, par 71 Muthaiga Golf course opened as early as 1920. In 1967 the first major golf tournament which is today known as Kenya Open Golf tournament was held at Muthaiga Golf Club. It was so successful that it has been held here ever since. In 2004 South African course designer Peter Matkovich redesigned the 18-hole Muthaiga Golf course.

4.   Windsor Golf Hotel and Country Club 18-hole, par 72 golf course is located off Kiambu Road in Nairobi, Kenya boosting Victorian style buildings and an 18-hole championship golf course. There is a strict dress code for Windsor’s golf course and driving range. The velvet monkeys and kite birds along the course are said to enhance the wildlife golfing experience. 

5.   Nyali Golf and Country Club is located off Links Road in Mombasa, Kenya. The golf course was designed by Monty Lowry in 1958. The 18 holes, par 71 course offers testing short rough and numerous doglegs. 

Photos by Kenya Golf Guide 

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Friday, April 17, 2015

West African Eba Onion Fritters Recipe

West African Eba Onion Fritters Recipe


Onion Fritters

Culture and food of Africa would not be complete without including the West African food recipe Eba Onion Fritters recipe.

West African Eba Onion Fritters Recipe

West African Eba Onion Fritters Recipe by Bob B Brown
African recipes by African Gourmet

West African Eba Onion Fritters are a delicious golden brown recipe made with ground cassava flour, onions and spices fried into delicious snacks.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients:

2 cups cassava flour

1/2 onion finely chopped

1/2 teaspoon garlic salt

1 tablespoon white sugar

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 - 1/3 cups water

1-2 cups oil for frying

Directions:

In a large frying pan heat vegetable oil. Add all ingredients, mix well and form small fritters, fry in hot oil until golden brown about 3 minutes on each side. Sprinkle with extra salt or curry powder before serving.

West African Eba Onion Fritters Recipe by Bob B Brown

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Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

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A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.