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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Friday, November 28, 2014

South African Smothered Chicken Inyama Yenkukhu Recipe

The African Gourmet serves up this Smothered Chicken South African style recipe. Smothered Chicken or Inyama Yenkukhu is a classic South African dish. 


Simple delicious and made with love this South African dish goes well with South African yellow rice and raisins. Inyama Yenkukhu is a South African dish that is similar to Smothered Chicken and Gravy in the Southern United States.  


Smothered Chicken is a southern comfort food dish. This version of Inyama Yenkukhu uses the same ingredients as smothered chicken and is an easy tasty dish where the chicken is first lightly fried and then gravy is created.
 

Inyama Yenkukhu African Smothered Chicken


African recipes by African Gourmet

Inyama Yenkukhu is a South African dish that is similar to Smothered Chicken and Gravy in the Southern United States.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients
3 chicken thighs with skin
3 chicken legs with skin
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 medium onion, chopped
1 cup all-purpose flour
Salt and pepper to taste


Directions
Heat oil in a large frying pan and season chicken with salt and pepper. Place each piece of chicken in the flour covering completely and fry until the skin is a light golden brown. Add remaining ingredients; simmer for 30 minutes until chicken is tender.



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Sunday, November 23, 2014

The Kola Nut Tree was the First Tree on Earth

The Igbo, a tribe in southeastern Nigeria, consider the Kola-nut tree to be the first tree on earth; the Kola-nut or Oji and Nzu or chalk has significant meaning to the Igbo. The Igbo consider the Kola-nut to be a representation of friendliness and compassion. 


Kola-nut tree

The Kola-nut is a bitter caffeine-rich chestnut-sized fruit borne seed of a 20 feet high evergreen tree native to tropical Africa.  The Kola-nut is a rough, skinned fruit that grows up to 8" long. Inside the pod is the actual kola seed is thin with a white flesh but bright red inside when the seeds are sliced. Kola trees are native to West Africa found from Togo to Angola, Liberia to Côte d'Ivoire, Senegal and Nigeria.

Selling Kola-nut in the market
photo by Barry Pousman
The caffeine-containing seed smells a bit like rose petals. Kola nuts also have a reputation for treating headaches. By chewing the caffeine rich Kola-nut the caffeine is extracted, caffeine is considered as a cure for headaches.  The original Coca-Cola beverage was made with an extract of kola nuts and coca leaves.

Igbo tribe

The Igbo, a tribe in southeastern Nigeria, consider the Kola-nut tree to be the first tree on earth. They consider the Kola-nut to be a representation of friendliness and compassion. 

Igbo people are one of the largest ethnic groups in Africa and Oji (kola nut) is the first thing served to a visitor in an Igbo home. Kola-nut or Oji is served before an important centerpiece in many ceremonies and festivals. In addition, the breaking of the Kola-nut or Oji in an Igbo wedding is an ancient tradition rich in Igbo cultural customs representing love, harmony, unity, honesty and high esteem.

Nzu, a type of chalk or clay also plays a great role of social importance in Igbo culture. In Igbo society it is presented with a kola-nut or Oji to guests having a religious reflection of traditional Igbo goodwill. 

It also is a symbol of happiness conveyed by the host. Kola-nut or Oji and Nzu (chalk) has significant meaning to the Igbo because of the breaking, blessing and sharing of Kola-nut or Oji is a tradition which has been handed down from ancestor to ancestor for hundreds of years. This is why the Igbo consider the Kola-nut tree to be the first tree on earth.

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Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Homemade Fiery Carrot Sambal Relish

Sambal is a spicy thick relish packed with hot peppery flavor and seasoned vegetables. Sambal is made from various ingredients and may be fresh or cooked. It is commonly made from vegetables, chilies and onions. Sambal is used similar to salsa. Serve with any dish.

Homemade Fiery Carrot Sambal Relish


African recipes by African Gourmet

Sambal is a spicy thick African relish recipe packed with hot peppery flavor and seasoned vegetables.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:  

Ingredients:

4 cups finely grated carrots

1 medium finely sliced onion

1/4 cup lemon juice

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon minced ginger

1 teaspoon brown sugar

3 chopped hot chilies

Directions:

Toss carrots and onions with lemon juice and 1 teaspoon salt, let sit 1/2 hour, then squeeze with hands and discard any excess liquid. Combine with remaining ingredients and mix well. Allow to sit refrigerated for several hours before serving. Serve with any meat or seafood dish. Sambal is used similar to salsa.

Turkey sandwich with carrot sambal relish photo by jeffreyw





 

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Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Ethiopian and Eritrean Green Fields of Lovegrass

Teff is the seed of a grass native to Ethiopia and Eritrea known as lovegrass.


What is Injera bread? What is Teff?



Delicious vegetarian banquet on top of Injera bread photo by jodigreen
Injera bread is a flatbread traditionally eaten in the African countries of Ethiopia and Eritrea. Injera bread is thicker than a crepe but thinner than a pancake. In making Injera, teff flour is mixed with water and fermented over several days however, wheat flour or all-purpose flour can be used however, the taste and texture changes.


Eating with Injera bread is a stable in some African households in order to eat dishes of vegetables, meats and stews.  Injera bread is used in place of utensils using pieces of Injera to pick up bites of food. Injera bread is eaten daily in all most every Ethiopian and Eritrean household. The Ethiopian dish Spicy Red Lentils goes perfectly with injera.


Teff Grass also known as lovegrass by International Potash Institute
Teff is a grass, small sized fine grain that grows mainly in Ethiopia and Eritrea. The grain is tiny and has a very mild, nutty flavor. Due to its very small size teff cooks quickly and is naturally gluten-free. Ground into flour, teff is used to make the traditional bread, injera. The teff crop’s history traces back thousands of years as a reliable staple crop. 

According to the BBC Ethiopia currently has a long-standing ban on exporting the teff grain, either in its raw form, or after it has been ground into flour. Instead, entrepreneurial Ethiopian companies can at present only export injera and other cooked teff products, such as cakes and biscuits.

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Thursday, November 6, 2014

Uji Kenyan Cereal Porridge a non-GMO Food Recipe

Sorghum is a whole grain widely eaten throughout the world. In Africa, sorghum is mainly a human food product, while in the United States sorghum is used mainly for livestock feed. Recently in the United States due partly to the gluten-free benefits of sorghum, many Americans are beginning to eat Sorghum. 



Sorghum, which has an eatable hull, is generally eaten with all its outer layers retaining the bulk of its nutrients.  Sorghum, grown from traditional hybrid seeds does not have the qualities of grain grown through biotechnology, making it a non-GMO food. GMO stands for genetically modified organisms plants or animals made from the gene splicing techniques of biotechnology.


Uji or Kenyan Cereal Porridge
Uji or Kenyan Cereal Porridge photo by Mouse
Uji or Kenyan Cereal Porridge


Ingredients:

1 cup corn meal
1 cup sorghum
3 cups of water
2 tablespoons butter


Directions:

Add all ingredients to a medium pot stir well and simmer on low 30 minutes. Serve warm with a lot of butter. Add sugar as needed.



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Tuesday, November 4, 2014

Are there Any Fair-Minded Honest African Politicians

The Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership. Fair-minded Honest African Politicians, the Ibrahim Prize winner gets $5 million spread over 10 years, then $200,000 per year after that for life, plus another $200,000 per year to direct to any cause he or she wants.


Dr. Mohamed "Mo" Ibrahim is a very successful Sudanese entrepreneur.
Mo Ibrahim
Dr. Mohamed "Mo" Ibrahim is a very successful Sudanese entrepreneur. He sold his company in 2005 with a profit of $640 million. 

Since 2006, Mo Ibrahim $100 million foundation funds an annual prize for the most honest African leader. Ibrahim believes that "nothing, absolutely nothing, is more important to African development than good governance."

"When I first started talking about the potential for investment and business opportunities in Africa some 20 years ago, I found myself an isolated voice. That turned out to be good for me – and the few others who saw, invested, and reaped wonderful rewards from that potential – but not so good for the continent."  -Mo Ibrahim

According to the foundation's website “The Mo Ibrahim Foundation was established in 2006 with a focus on the critical importance of leadership and governance in Africa. By providing tools to support progress in leadership and governance, the Foundation aims to promote meaningful change on the continent. The Foundation, which is a non-grant making organization, focuses on defining, assessing and enhancing governance and leadership in Africa through four main initiatives:

  • Ibrahim Index of African Governance
  • Ibrahim Prize
  • Ibrahim Forum
  • Fellowships & Scholarships

About the Ibrahim Prize for Achievement in African Leadership

One of the founding initiatives of the Foundation, the Ibrahim Prize celebrates excellence in African leadership. It is awarded to a former Executive Head of State or Government by an independent Prize Committee composed of eminent figures, including two Nobel Laureates.

The Ibrahim Prize recognizes and celebrates African leaders who have developed their countries, lifted people out of poverty and paved the way for sustainable and equitable prosperity highlights exceptional role models for the continent ensures that Africa continues to benefit from the experience and expertise of exceptional leaders when they leave national office, by enabling them to continue in other public roles on the continent

Criteria:
  • Former African Executive Head of State or Government
  • Left office in the last three years
  • Democratically elected
  • Served his/her constitutionally mandated term
  • Demonstrated exceptional leadership


Past Winners of the Ibrahim Prize:
  • Joaquim Chissano of Mozambique in 2007
  • Festus Mogae of Botswana in 2008
  • In 2009, 2010 and 2013 there was no winner
  • Pedro Verona Pires of Cape Verde in 2011
  • 2012 the foundation awarded Archbishop Desmond Tutu a one-off $1 million special prize for his lifelong commitment towards "speaking truth to power."

  • President Hifikepunye Pohamba Namibia 2014

According to the foundation, the Ibrahim Prize winner gets $5 million spread over 10 years, then $200,000 per year after that for life, plus another $200,000 per year to direct to any cause he or she wants.

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