Curiosity is the key to knowledge.

Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

Popular_Topics

The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Where Is Zimbabwe In Africa

Where Is Zimbabwe In Africa

Virtual guide to Zimbabwe
Zimbabwe is located in Southern Africa, between South Africa and Zambia whose major urban areas are in cities Harare and Bulawayo.

Chegutu Bus Station Zimbabwe

Where Is Zimbabwe In Africa


Where Is Zimbabwe In Africa

Zimbabwe borders four African countries; Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zambia. Natural resources are coal, chromium ore, asbestos, gold, nickel, copper, iron ore, vanadium, lithium, tin, platinum group metals


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Zimbabwe is landlocked; the Zambezi river forms a natural riverine boundary with Zambia and Victoria Falls on the river forms the world's largest curtain of falling water; Lake Kariba on the Zambia - Zimbabwe border forms the world's largest reservoir by volume. Zimbabwe is slightly larger than the US State of Montana.

Do you know where Zimbabwe is?






Zimbabwe is a landlocked African country located in Southern Africa, between South Africa and Zambia and is slightly larger than the US State of Montana.

Languages spoken in Zimbabwe are English which is the official language, Shona, Sindebele (Ndebele) and, numerous tribal dialects.

Shona is a Bantu language, native to the Shona people of Zimbabwe and southern Zambia. Shona is spoken by over 10 million people. Shona has many dialects the major ones are Karanga, Manyika, and Zezuru.

The actual pronunciation of the characters in the Shona language depends upon the dialect. Shona has a highly established written language however; it is not the general medium of instruction beyond primary school. English is used as a lingua franca in the countries in which Shona is spoken.

Zimbabwe Shona Language Phrases

Welcome - Mauya
Thank you - Waita zvako
I love you - Ndinokuda
Chokwadiǃ - Is that right?
Yaa - Yes
Ee Yebo - Hello


Zimbabwe Flag Description
Seven equal horizontal bands of green, yellow, red, black, red, yellow, and green with a white isosceles triangle edged in black with its base on the hoist side; a yellow Zimbabwe bird representing the long history of the country is superimposed on a red five-pointed star in the center of the triangle, which symbolizes peace; green represents agriculture, yellow mineral wealth, red the blood shed to achieve independence, and black stands for the native people.




Share this page

Saturday, September 27, 2014

Rebuilding Sierra Leone After Civil War and Ebola

Rebuilding Sierra Leone after civil war, an Ebola survivor tells his story. Before the Ebola outbreak, Sierra Leone was on track to overcome its troubled past of civil war. The country's Ebola epidemic is threatening to stop the progress of Sierra Leone’s economic and social growth, more than 40 percent of Sierra Leone's population is under 15 years old. 



Sierra Leone’s flag
Since the end of the civil war in 2002, Sierra Leone has been steadily rebuilding physical, social and health infrastructure. 

Democracy is slowly being reestablished after the civil war from 1991 to 2002 that resulted in tens of thousands of deaths and the displacement of more than 2 million people. 

The armed forces remained on the sideline during the 2007 and 2012 national elections, and over the past year have deployed over 850 peacekeepers in the African Union Mission in Somalia. As of January 2014, Sierra Leone also fielded 122 staff for five UN peacekeeping missions.

In March 2014, the closure of the UN Integrated Peace building Office in Sierra Leone marked the end of more than 15 years of peacekeeping and political operations in Sierra Leone. The government's priorities include furthering development, creating jobs, and stamping out endemic corruption. However, the challenges of endemic corruption, high youth unemployment, inadequate services, and widespread poverty are still critical impediments to progress.


Before the Ebola outbreak, Sierra Leone was on track to overcome its troubled past. The post-Ebola recovery period could prove challenging. 

Sierra Leone’s Vision for 2013 to 2035 is to become a middle-income country, be an inclusive, green country, with 80% of the population above the poverty line, have gender equality, a well-educated, healthy population, good governance and rule of law, well-developed infrastructure, macroeconomic stability, with private-sector, export-led growth generating wide employment opportunities; there would be good environmental protection, and responsible natural resource exploitation. 

The post-Ebola recovery period could prove challenging but the small African nation since the end of the civil war in 2002 has found the strength and resources to inch by inch reestablish itself, despite Ebola the county can remain on track for vision 2035.

Ebola Survivor Story


Did you know...Sierra Leone’s flag is three equal horizontal bands of green (top), white, and blue; green symbolizes agriculture, mountains, and natural resources, white represents unity and justice, and blue the sea and the natural harbor in Freetown.

Share this page

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Striking Ebola Workers in West Africa

Ebola Workers in West Africa Strike Over Not Being Paid.


On November 26, 2014, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf visited the Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU) and according to the Liberia News Agency, she stated that although it is difficult working with such a disease, the health workers are “doing extremely well in tackling it,” adding, “Thank you very much for serving your country. “However, workers at the ETU have staged a protest in demand of salaries for November and December, 2014. A hotline was established by the United Nations Development Programme to make all back payments by the end of 2014 however, no progress has been made to date.

Decontamination before exiting an Ebola Treatment Unit
Decontamination before exiting an Ebola Treatment Unit
A spokesperson for the workers, stated the Liberian Ministry of Health and Social Welfare instructed them to open bank accounts where their monthly salary will be transferred for payment but, the money was never deposited into their accounts. As of January 2015, no money has been received; this is an ongoing issue since the outbreak of  Ebola in portions of West Africa. The lead staff person, Dr. Jonathan Hart informed President Sirleaf that the Liberian ETU lacks an ambulance and operational vehicles as well as uniforms for the Ebola workers.
Sudipto Mukerjee of the United Nations Development Programme stated “The transition from direct cash to an electronic solution will help to improve overall efficiency, timeliness and security of payments for Ebola response workers.” “We cannot afford to lose a single minute where people have put their tools down and refuse to work,” he said. “That is why reliable and predictable mobile payments are so significant.” Response workers battling the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone will receive “hazard pay” for the first time using mobile money because “unless there is a certain element of incentives, or danger pay, it’s very difficult to attract and retain people.”

“These people are working on the front lines. They could be alive today and dead tomorrow,” he said. “If they’re not paid on time, if they’re not paid the right amount of money, they get frustrated and they tend to protest, which means that whatever Ebola care is being provided will no longer be available. We cannot afford a strike. We have to keep the whole system going.”

Share this page

Monday, September 22, 2014

African Musician Hugh Masekela: 20 Years of Freedom

Hugh Masekela is a world-renowned musician and political leader who released over 40 albums. Masekela musical style was influenced by Miles Davis. Masekela performed at the Monterey Pop Festival alongside The Who. U2 front-man Bono said playing with Masekela was one of the highlights of his career.


Hugh Masekela was born 75 years ago in the town of Witbank, South Africa in 1939. Masekela began to hone his, now signature, Afro-Jazz sound in the late 1950s. In 1960, at the age of 21 he left South Africa to begin what would be 30 years in exile from the land of his birth.

Hugh Masekela world-renowned musician and political leader photo by afromusing
On arrival in New York he enrolled at the Manhattan School of Music. This coincided with a golden era of jazz music and the young Hugh Masekela immersed himself in the New York jazz scene where nightly he watched greats like Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, Charlie Mingus and Max Roach. Under the tutelage of Dizzy Gillespie and Louis Armstrong, Hugh was encouraged to develop his own unique style, feeding off African rather than American influences – his debut album, released in 1963, was entitled Trumpet Africaine.

In 1967 Hugh performed at the Monterey Pop Festival alongside Janis Joplin, Otis Redding, Ravi Shankar, The Who and Jimi Hendrix. In 1968, his instrumental single ‘Grazin’ in the Grass’ went to Number One on the American pop charts and was a worldwide smash, elevating Hugh onto the international stage. In 1990 Hugh returned home, following the unbanning of the ANC and the release of Nelson Mandela – an event anticipated in Hugh’s anti-apartheid anthem ‘Bring Home Nelson Mandela’ (1986) which had been a rallying cry around the world. 

In June 2010 Masekela opened the FIFA Soccer World Cup Kick-Off Concert to a global audience and performed at the event’s Opening Ceremony in Soweto’s Soccer City. The US Virgin Islands proclaimed ‘Hugh Masekela Day’ in March 2011, not long after Hugh joined U2 on stage during the Johannesburg leg of their 360 World Tour. U2 front-man Bono described meeting and playing with Hugh as one of the highlights of his career.


According to his biography, Masekela is currently using his global reach to spread the word about heritage restoration in Africa – a topic that remains very close to his heart. Masekela says “My biggest obsession is to show Africans and the world who the people of Africa really are,” Masekela confides – and it’s this commitment to his home continent that has propelled him forward since he first began playing the trumpet.

February and March 2015, South African musical legends Hugh Masekela and Vusi Mahlesela embarked on a North American musical tour, 20 Years of Freedom. The tour celebrated the 20th anniversary of South Africa’s social equality and the end of apartheid.

Share this page

Saturday, September 20, 2014

The Cooking Pot African Folktale in Arabic, Swahili, and Hausa

The Cooking Pot African Folktale translated into Arabic, Kiswahili or Swahili, and Hausa

Africa Storytelling
Africa has a long traditional history of oral storytelling; the Cooking Pot is one of the most beloved African folktales translated into the top three most spoken languages in Africa, Arabic, Kiswahili or Swahili, and Hausa.

Cooking pot in South Africa

The Cooking Pot African Folktale


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




The Cooking Pot African Folktale translated into the top three most spoken languages in Africa are Arabic, Kiswahili or Swahili, and Hausa.


The Cooking Pot African Folktale


A man once brought home to his wife a very old cooking-pot, and told her to use it every day when preparing the evening meal.

The woman was not pleased at the idea of using such a battered vessel, and feared that her friends would ridicule her, but she dared not disobey her husband, and began to use the pot, as he demanded.

Little did she guess that the pot was a magic one, and had the virtue of turning the ashes of the fire, on which it rested, into gold. Every night the husband crept out, when all were asleep in the huts around the compound, and gathered together these golden ashes, which he stored safely away.

One day a young man in the village was about to set off on a journey; he came to the woman while her husband was absent, and asked a favor of her. He said that he had taken a fancy to her old cooking-pot, and would give her a fine new one in exchange for it. The woman hesitated, but she was ashamed of the ugly old pot, and was glad of an excuse to get rid of it.

When her husband found what she had done, he was very angry, but it was now too late to recover the pot, as the young man was already far away in the forest.

Naturally, he had not obtained the pot without knowing its secret, for he had observed the actions of the man who so mysteriously collected the ashes every night; and it is said that from that day the young man spent his life cooking, and so earned the name of “Chop,” or “Food!

The Cooking Pot African Folktale in Arabic
al altaerif, qadr altabikha, 'afriqiun, fulkital 

rajul maratan wahidatan jalabat 'iilaa manzil zawjatih wiea' altabkh alqadim jidanaan, waqal laha liaistikhdamiha klu yawm eind 'iiedad wajabat almasa'.

lm takun almar'at masrurat bifikrat aistikhdam mithl hadhih alsafinat almudtaribati, wakhashiat min 'an 'asdiqayiha yaskhurun minha, lakanha lm tujriw ealaa edm eusyan zawjiha, wabada'at fi aistikhdam waea'in, kama talb.

lm tukhamin 'ana wiea' kan sihr wahid, wakan alfadilat min tahwil rimad alnaari, alty aistaraha, 'iilaa aldhahb. wafi kli laylat kan alzawj yukhriju, eindama kan klhm nayimin fi al'akwakh hawl almajamie, wajamaeuu hadhih alramad aldhahabya, aldhy kan yakhzan baman baeidana.

yawm wahid kan shabun fi alqaryat ealaa washk 'an yantaliq fi rihlat. ja' 'iilaa almar'at baynama kan zawjiha ghayibaan, watalab min salihha. waqal 'iinah kan yatawaham 'iilaa wiea' altabkh alqadyima, wasawf yuetiha wahidat jadidat jayidat mqabl dhalik. wataradadat almar'atu, lakunaha khajalat min alqadr alqadim alqabihi, wakan saeidaan dharieat liltakhalus minhu.

eindama wajad zawjiha ma faealatuh, kan ghadibana jadana, walakuni alan qad fat al'awan liaistieadat waea'in, wakan alshshabu beyda balfel fi alghabati.

wabitabieat alhali, lm yakun qad hasal ealaa wiea' min dun maerifat sarihi, li'anah lahaz 'aemal alrajul aldhy jamaeat bighumud alrimad kli lilatin. wayuqal 'an min dhlk alyawm 'anfaq alshshaba hayatah altubkha, wahakdha hasal ealaa aism "khtam", 'aw "alghadha'!


The Cooking Pot African Folktale in Swahili
Mpikaji wa kupikia Afrika Folktale


Mtu mmoja alileta nyumbani kwake mkewe sufuria ya kale ya kupikia, akamwambia aitumie kila siku wakati wa kuandaa chakula cha jioni.

Mwanamke hakuwa na furaha ya kutumia chombo hicho kilichopigwa, na aliogopa kuwa marafiki zake watamdharau, lakini hakutaka kumtii mumewe, na akaanza kutumia sufuria, kama alivyodai.

Yeye hakufikiri kwamba sufuria ilikuwa moja ya uchawi, na alikuwa na nguvu ya kugeuka majivu ya moto, ambayo ilipumzika, ndani ya dhahabu. Kila usiku mume akaondoka nje, wakati wote walikuwa wamelala katika vibanda karibu na kiwanja, na wakakusanyika majivu haya ya dhahabu, ambayo aliihifadhi salama.

Siku moja kijana mmoja katika kijiji alikuwa karibu kwenda safari; alikuja kwa mwanamke wakati mumewe hakuwapo, na akamwuliza neema yake. Alisema kuwa alikuwa amefanya dhana ya sufuria yake ya kupikia zamani, na angeweza kumpa mpya mpya kwa ajili yake. Mwanamke alisita, lakini alikuwa na aibu ya sufuria ya zamani, na alikuwa na furaha ya kujiondoa.

Mumewe alipopata kile alichokifanya, alikasirika sana, lakini sasa alikuwa amekwisha kuchelewa sana kuokoa sufuria, kama kijana huyo alikuwa tayari yuko mbali sana katika msitu.

Kwa kawaida, hakuwa na pombe bila kujua siri yake, kwa sababu alikuwa ameona matendo ya mtu ambaye amekusanya majivu kila usiku; na inasema kuwa tangu siku hiyo kijana huyo alitumia maisha yake kupika, na hivyo alipata jina la "Chop," au "Chakula!

The Cooking Pot African Folktale in Hausa
Ma'aikatar Abincin Gurasar Abinci

Wani mutum ya kawo wa matarsa wata tsohuwar tukunya, kuma ya gaya mata ta yi amfani da ita a kowace rana yayin shirya abinci na yamma.

Matar ta ba ta farin ciki da tunanin yin amfani da irin wannan jirgin ruwa, kuma yana tsoron cewa abokansa za su yi masa ba'a, amma ta yi watsi da rashin biyayya ga mijinta, sai ta fara amfani da tukunya kamar yadda ya bukaci.

Kadan ba ta tsammani tukunya abu ne mai sihiri, kuma yana da iko na juya toka na wuta, inda aka huta shi, cikin zinariya. Kowace rana mijin ya fita, lokacin da duk suna barci a cikin ɗakin da ke kusa da gidan, kuma sun tattaro dutsen nan na zinariya, wanda ya adana shi lafiya.

Wata rana wata saurayi a ƙauyen ke shirin tashi a kan tafiya; sai ya zo wurin matar yayin da mijinta bai halarta ba, kuma ya nemi taimakonta. Ya ce ya dauka wa'adin tsohuwar tukunyarta, kuma zai ba ta sabuwar kyauta don musanya shi. Matar ta yi jinkirin, amma ta kunyata ta tukunya mai tsanani, kuma ta yi farin ciki da uzuri don kawar da shi.

Lokacin da mijinta ya gano abin da ta yi, sai ya yi fushi, amma yanzu ya yi latti don sake tukunyar tukunya, kamar yadda saurayi ya riga ya nisa a cikin gandun daji.

A hakika, bai samu tukunya ba tare da sanin asirinsa ba, domin ya lura da ayyukan mutumin da ya yi ban mamaki da gaske ya tattara toka a kowace dare; kuma an ce cewa tun daga wannan rana saurayi ya kashe rayuwarsa, ya kuma sami sunan "Chop," ko "Abincin!


The Village Cooking Pot

Have you ever wondered about...
The Man Who Never Lied African folktale


Share this page

Thursday, September 18, 2014

Algerian Chorba 'dess or Lentil Soup Recipe

Algerian Chorba 'dess or Soupe de lentilles or Lentil Soup



Did you know…

The African Country of Algeria has the second largest French speaking population in the world.


Chorba 'dess or Soupe de lentilles or Lentil Soup



Photo by mollyjade
Ingredients:

1 pound lamb meat thinly sliced

1 large white onion, finely chopped

2 teaspoons good quality ground coriander
1 cup dried lentils

2 large potatoes diced

2 large carrots diced

8 cups water

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:

Add all ingredients to a large pot simmer until vegetables are tender for about an hour. Serve with rice.




 

Share this page

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Green Sea Turtle Nesting In Africa

Many African islands are known as Turtle Island due to green sea turtles nesting on their beaches.

Green Sea Turtles

Guinea-Bissau Green Sea Turtles

João Viera-Poilão Marine Park has the largest green sea turtle nesting site on the Atlantic coast of Africa. It is illegal to collect, harm or kill green sea turtles in Guinea-Bissau Africa.

Green Sea Turtle Nesting In Africa



Guinea-Bissau is a small coastal West African country just to the South of Senegal where many indigenous African languages are spoken along with a unique dialect of Crioulo (Creole mixed with Portuguese and French). 

Guinea-Bissau was once part of the Mali Empire known as Gabu. The Portuguese set up slave trade operations in the ports of Bissau and Cacheu on the coast of Guinea, the interior was not explored until around 1915 with heavy resistance from the indigenous population. The islands off the coast of Guinea-Bissau Bijagos Archipelago (islands) are 88 islands and islets of which 23 are inhabited.
Guinea-Bissau is a small coastal West African country photo by gaborbasch
Guinea-Bissau is a small coastal West African country
photo by gaborbasch

The Bijagos islands are a Biosphere Reserve or internationally designated protected areas since 1996, with two National Marine Parks, João Viera-Poilão and Orango. João Viera-Poilão has the largest green sea turtle nesting site on the Atlantic coast of Africa. 

The endangered green sea turtle migrates long distances to nest on the shores of Africa’s Guinea-Bissau. Green sea turtles migrate long distances between feeding sites and nesting sites; some swim more than 2,600 kilometers or 1,600 miles to reach their breeding grounds. It is illegal to collect, harm or kill green sea turtles, Guinea-Bissau has numerous local and international laws and regulations to protect green sea turtles nesting areas.

The endangered green sea turtle migrates long distances to nest on the shores of Africa’s Guinea-Bissau.
The Bijagos islands also have a Marine Protected Area Community of Formosa islands, Nago and Urok.  Bijagos islands are the second most important site for migratory birds in West Africa after the Banc d'Arguin in Mauritania.  Each year the archipelago receives countless overwintering and breeding waterbirds at the Community Urok Marine Protected Area. As of late, the Bijagos islands are a tourist attraction for beach goers and wildlife enthusiasts.


Green Sea Turtles 3 facts

Green Sea Turtles grow up to 1.5 meters (5 ft) in length and can weigh over 300 kg (700 lbs), making them the largest of the hardshell sea turtles.

Average life span in the wild is 80 or more years for green sea turtles.

Green sea turtles can stay underwater for up to five hours, but their feeding dives usually only last five minutes or less.



Share this page

Monday, September 1, 2014

Angola Bie Province Antipersonnel Landmines

Landmines in Angola Africa

Landmines in Africa

No safe steps, the Sarajevo of Africa, Angola Bie Province landmines

Kuito is the distressed but slowly restoring capital of Bie Province. Bié is a province of Angola located on the Bié Plateau in the central part of Angola. Parts of Angola are contaminated with mines as a result of four decades of almost continuous warfare, making it the most mine-affected country in sub-Saharan Africa and one of the most mined countries in the world. An anti-personnel weapon is one primarily used to inflict death or cause major bodily injury to people. Anti-personnel landmines are explosive devices designed to explode when a person gets near the device or steps on the device.

Angola Bie Province landmines


Kuito is still surrounded by rings of landmines. Situated in central Angola, Kuito used to be called Silva Porto, taking its name from Francisco Ferreira da Silva, who was Bie's colonial commander in chief and came from the northern Portuguese city of Porto. 

Francisco Ferreira da Silva founded Kuito in 1845. Kuito, the capital of Bie, is a city destroyed by war. Known as the "Sarajevo of Africa", Kuito has been reduced to rubble after being besieged by the National Union for the Total Independence of Angola (UNITA) rebels for almost 20 years. UNITA was led by Jonas Savimbi and was supported by the country’s largest ethnic group, the Ovimbundu. The Ovimbundu, also known as the Umbundu people inhabit the Bié Plateau in Angola.
Landmine photo by DFAT photo library
The late Diana Princess of Wales visited the Angolan province of Bie in 1997 in support of the Halo Trust, not long before her death in a car crash in Paris. Pictures of Diana wearing protective gear as she observed mine-clearing efforts by Halo in the towns of Huambo and Kuito helped draw the world's attention to the horrific ordeals of amputees and the suffering caused by landmines.

War and landmines

Parts of Angola are contaminated with mines as a result of four decades of almost continuous warfare, making it the most mine-affected country in sub-Saharan Africa and one of the most mined countries in the world. Some mines were put into place to discourage people from searching for food holding them captive and at the mercy of insurgents. Human rights groups have long alleged abuses against Angolan civilians.
Landmines by tonrulkens
Angola is one of Africa's leading oil producers, but most rural citizens still live on less than $1 a day making agriculture a vital need in order to survive. However, the presence of landmines creates a situation where rural citizens are dependent on food transported into the area.
The Republic of Angola signed the Mine Ban Treaty on December 4, 1997 however, since 1994 Halo has removed and destroyed 21,300 antipersonnel and antitank mines so far with its efforts steadily moving out from the town center to areas farther afield. Anti-personnel landmines are explosive devices designed to explode when a person gets near the device or steps on the device.

Angola's lingering civil war, which broke out after it gained independence from Portugal officially ended in 2002. The Alvor Agreement signed on January 15, 1975, granted Angola independence from Portugal on November 11, 1975. Angola 27-year civil war killed and injured well over one million people.

Angola Landmines 3 facts

The late Diana Princess of Wales visited the Angolan province of Bie in 1997 in support of the Halo Trust

Parts of Angola are contaminated with mines as a result of four decades of almost continuous warfare, making it the most mine-affected country in sub-Saharan Africa and one of the most mined countries in the world.

According to the HALO Trust, there are more than 620 minefields mapped and recorded in the eight provinces they currently operate in; Benguela, Bié, Cunene, Huambo, Huila, Kuando Kubango, Kuanza Sul and Namibe.



Share this page

Chic African Culture Featured Articles

Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

Wise Words


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.