Curiosity is the key to knowledge.

Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Seared Brown Sugar Sweet Plantain Dessert Recipe

Complete your meal with a seared brown sugar sweet plantain African dessert recipe in just 15 minutes.



Seared Brown Sugar Sweet Plantain


Ingredients
Seared Brown Sugar Sweet Plantain African Dessert Recipe 2 very ripe yellow and brown plantains
2 tablespoons butter
1/2 cup brown sugar
3 tablespoons vinegar
Directions
Remove the skins from the plantains cut them in half lengthwise. Arrange the halves in a shallow pan. Melt the butter and mix it with the sugar and the vinegar. Pour a spoonful of the mixture over each plantain. Cook until soft about 5 minutes and remove from heat serve warm.




Did you know…?

Plantains are a starchy fruit and are very versatile in the kitchen they are boiled, steamed, baked and fried. Plantains may look like bananas but they are longer, have thicker skin, and are starchier. Plantains are a major staple in Africa and are usually eaten cooked unless they are very ripe. Plantains are especially important in sub-Saharan Africa.

Plantains may look like bananas but they are longer, have thicker skin, and are starchier.



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Thursday, June 20, 2013

African Folktale | Why Cats Kill Rats

Why Cats Kill Rats African folktale. African folktales are an oral storytelling tradition shaped by tongues of African elders.


Why Cats Kill Rats African Folktale

Ansa was King of Calabar for fifty years. He had a very faithful cat as a housekeeper, and a rat was his house-boy. The king was an obstinate, headstrong man, but was very fond of the cat, who had been in his store for many years.

African folktale: Why the cat kills rats - photo by hannibal poenaru
The rat, who was very poor, fell in love with one of the king's servant girls, but was unable to give her any presents, as he had no money.

At last he thought of the king's store, so in the night-time, being quite small, he had little difficulty, having made a hole in the roof, in getting into the store. He then stole corn and pears, and presented them to his sweetheart.

At the end of the month, when the cat had to render her account of the things in the store to the king, it was found that a lot of corn and pears were missing.

The king was very angry at this, and asked the cat for an explanation. But the cat could not account for the loss, until one of her friends told her that the rat had been stealing the corn and giving it to the girl. When the cat told the king, he called the girl before him and had her beaten. The rat he handed over to the cat to deal with, and dismissed them both from his service. The cat was so angry at this that she killed and ate the rat, and ever since that time whenever a cat sees a rat she kills and eats it.

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Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Kenyan Mukimo Pumpkin Leaf Veggie Soup

In Kenya, Mukimo is a wholesome veggie soup made with pumpkin leaves. Pumpkin leaves have iron, protein, calcium, vitamin A and vitamin C and is nutritious. Pumpkin leaves may just become your favorite leafy green vegetable.


Homemade soup is the best option to make for your family since some canned soups are full of sodium and light on nutrients. 


Kenyan Mukimo Pumpkin Leaf Veggie Soup

Kenyan Mukimo Pumpkin Leaf Veggie Soup
Kenyan Mukimo Pumpkin Leaf Veggie Soup
Photo by thomas wanhoff

Ingredients:
2 cups mashed pumpkin
1 cup frozen corn
2 handfuls fresh washed pumpkin leaves
1 large white potato sliced thin
½ teaspoon salt
½ teaspoon black pepper
2 cups vegetable broth

Directions:
Add all ingredients into a large pot and mix well. Cook until potato is tender about 15 minutes, serve over rice.

   

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Monday, June 17, 2013

Speak Zulu: 20 easy Zulu Words to Impress Your Friends

Zulu is the language of the Zulu people with well over 9 million speakers most of whom are in South Africa. Zulu is one of South Africa's eleven official languages since 1994.


Below are 20 easy Zulu words with their English phonetic pronunciation:

20 easy Zulu words with their English phonetic pronunciation
Twenty easy Zulu Words to Impress Your Friends
Buya [bu-ja] -Come back
Cela [ne-la]- To wish
iGoli [e-goːli]- Soil
ihembe [e:him:mbe]- Bed
isibili [is:see:billːli]- Bead
Khala [ka-la]- To cry
Khuluma [ku-lu-ma] -To speak
Kulula [gu-lu-la] -It’s easy
Lapha [la-pa] -Here
Lapho [la-po] -There
Lutho [lu-to]- Nothing
Moja! [mo-ts-cha] -Cool
Nini [ni-ni] -When
Phuza [pu-sa] -To drink
Sawubona [Sa-u-bu-o-na] - Hello
Suka [su-ga] -To go away
Thanda [tan-da] - To love
Thi [ti] -To say
Uju [ooːjew]- Jump
Yami [ja-mi] -My

You cannot know the good within yourself if you cannot see it in others - Zulu Proverb

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Friday, June 14, 2013

African Proverb About Winning Through Adversity

African Proverb About Winning Through Adversity

Proverbs Teach
African proverbs teach us about tough life lessons and when seeds of hardship are planted, the new growth is healthier and more plentiful. African proverbs explain the more challenging the hard times, the more valuable will be the lessons.

Lonely Island


African Proverb About Winning Through Adversity


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



African Proverbs


If you make friends with the boatman in the dry season, you will be the first to cross when the rains come and the tide is high – African Proverb

Smooth seas do not make skillful sailors – African Proverb

Once water has been spilled, it cannot be scooped back up - African Proverb

African proverbs explain the more challenging the hard times, the more valuable will be the lessons.


Smooth Seas Do Not Make Skillful Sailors, learn the lessons your ancestors are communicating with you and take to heart the African Proverbs about winning through adversity.

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Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Following the Money Trail in Africa

Money Trail in Africa

Money Trail in Africa






Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI)

The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative or EITI collects and validates data on financial management, accountability and transparency by African governments and companies in oil, gas and mining industries. Currently there are 27 African countries not participating in EITI's data collection on financial management, accountability and transparency.


Following the Money Trail


At a conference in London in June 2003, a Statement of Principles to increase transparency of payments and revenues in the extractive sector was agreed, The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, or EITI was born. EITI, is a voluntary, global effort designed to strengthen accountability and public trust for the revenues paid and received for a country’s oil, gas and mining.

EITI is a global coalition of governments, companies and civil society working together to improve openness and accountable management of revenues from natural resources. BP plc formerly BP, British Petroleum, is a British multinational oil and gas company headquartered in London, England is an originating member of EITI. Additional current oil companies partnered with EITI are Hess, Chevron, ExxonMobil, Royal Dutch Shell plc, Vale, Tullow oil, Qatar Petroleum, Maersk Oil, Lundin Petroleum AB, Noble Energy, and Dana Petroleum.

The EITI stresses the importance of transparency by governments and companies in oil, gas and mining industries and the need to enhance public financial management and accountability. EITI Compliant Countries have fully and to the satisfaction of the EITI board completed the four sign-up steps as an EITI Candidate. EITI establishes deadlines for publishing the first EITI Report and undertaking validation of the report. The first EITI report must be published within 18 months and begin validation within two and a half years.

There are a number of issues with the reporting requirements of EITI. The Africa Progress Report 2013 states “Reporting requirements on licenses and individual contracts need to be more stringent, and state-owned companies should be required to disclose not just the names of companies bidding for concessions and licenses, but also the beneficial ownership of those companies. The EITI should also adopt the central principle of Section 1504 of the US Dodd–Frank Act, which requires companies to report on their payments on a project-by-project basis, rather than by providing aggregate national-level reporting a practice that can obscure potential sources of corruption and revenue diversion.”



The Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI ) of Africa  as of November 2014. Countries  not listed are not participating in EITI  data on financial management, accountability and transparency.

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Friday, June 7, 2013

The Missing Link Between World War II, Axis, Vichy France, and 1944 Brazzaville Conference

The Missing Link Between World War II, Axis, Vichy France, and 1944 Brazzaville Conference

Brazzaville
The 1944 Brazzaville conference started the ball rolling for the year 1960 independence of 17 Sub-Saharan African countries and 14 French colonies.
Photo of a blind man and his sister 1944 in Africa

The Missing Link Between World War II, Axis, Vichy France, and 1944 Brazzaville Conference


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




The 10 day Brazzaville Conference was held from January 30 to February 8, 1944.


The year 1960 witnessed the independence of 17 Sub-Saharan African countries and 14 French colonies in part to the French defeat by Germany in 1940 World War II. January 30 to February 8, 1944 the Brazzaville Conference took place headed by Charles De Gaulle general of the Vichy France also known as the French State.
Brazzaville was chosen to host the conference due to the loyalty of the African colony


The Brazzaville conference or Conférence Africaine Française took place because in 1940, Germany defeated France and the status of French colonies came into question since France was now split into Vichy France in the unoccupied Southern region and the Axis of Germany, Japan and Italy occupied northern region of France. 

Vichy France’s Chief of State from 1940 to 1944 was a French World War I hero, Philippe Pétain who was later tried for treason. Germany enslaved millions French soldiers in Germany as forced laborers and enforcers for the Axis of Germany, Japan and Italy anti-Jewish, and political enemies policies.


French African Colonial Infantryman
French African Colonial Infantryman
In January 1944, Vichy France politicians and high-ranking colonial officials from the French African colonies met in Brazzaville, in present-day Congo. 

Brazzaville was chosen to host the conference due to the loyalty of the African colony brave fighting tirailleur or infantryman and the highly esteemed Governor general Félix Éboué. Vichy France recognized the need to revise the relationship between France and its colonies in Africa. 

During the Brazzaville conference, General de Gaulle suggested that it was time for France to take “the road of a new era” but he did not, would not discuss independence for French ruled Africa. 

The Brazzaville conference began the discussion of French decolonization and approved the legal ending of the native code or the Code de l'indigénat. The native code was a set of laws assigning an inferior legal status for African natives of French Colonies. The 1944 Brazzaville conference started the ball rolling for the year 1960 independence of 17 Sub-Saharan African countries and 14 French colonies.



Sailing off to war in AfricaDid you know?
Today Brazzaville is the capital, and river port of the Republic of the Congo and former capital of French Equatorial Africa.

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Tuesday, June 4, 2013

African Folktale Pretty Stranger Who Killed the King

Pretty Stranger who killed the King African Folktale.

Pretty Deadly
Pretty Stranger who killed the King African folktale teaches some of the most beautiful people on this planet are also some of the most deadly.
Dassanech Woman from Omerate Ethiopia

Pretty Stranger who killed the King African Folktale.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




She may look beautiful, but she will kill you.


Mbotu was a very famous king of Old Town, Calabar. He was frequently at war, and was always successful, as he was a most skillful leader. All the prisoners he took were made slaves. He therefore became very rich, but, on the other hand, he had many enemies. The people of Itu in particular were very angry with him and wanted to kill him, but they were not strong enough to beat Mbotu in a battle, so they had to resort to sneakiness.

The Itu people had an old woman who was a witch and could turn herself into whatever she pleased, and when she offered to kill Mbotu, the people were very glad, and promised her plenty of money and cloth if she succeeded in ridding them of their worst enemy.

The witch then turned herself into a young and pretty girl, and having armed herself with a very sharp knife, which she concealed in her bosom, she went to Old Town, Calabar, to seek the king. It happened that when she arrived there was a big play being held in the town, and all the people from the surrounding country had come in to dance and feast.

Oyaikan, the witch, went to the play, and walked about so that everyone could see her. Directly she appeared the people all marveled at her beauty, and said that she was as beautiful as the setting sun. Word was quickly brought to king Mbotu, who, it was well known, was fond of pretty girls, and he sent for her at once, all the people agreeing that she was quite worthy of being the king's wife.

When she appeared before him he fancied her so much, that he told her he would marry her that very day. Oyaikan was very pleased at this, as she had never expected to get her opportunity so quickly. She therefore prepared a meal for the king, into which she placed a strong medicine to make the king sleep, and then went down to the river to wash. When she finished it was getting dark, so she went to the king's compound, carrying her dish on her head, and was at once shown in to the king, who embraced her affectionately. She then offered him the food, which she said, quite truly, she had prepared with her own hands. The king ate the whole dish, and immediately began to feel very sleepy, as the medicine was strong and took effect quickly.

They retired to the king's chamber, and the king went to sleep at once. About midnight, when all the town was quiet, Oyaikan drew her knife from her bosom and cut the king's head off. She put the head in a bag and went out very softly, shutting and barring the door behind her. Then she walked through the town without anyone observing her, and went straight to Itu, where she placed king Mbotu's head before her own king. When the people heard that the witch was successful and that their enemy was dead, there was great rejoicing, and the king of Itu at once made up his mind to attack Old Town, Calabar. He therefore got his fighting men together and took them in canoes by the creeks to Old Town, taking care that no one carried word to Calabar that he was coming.

The morning following the murder of Mbotu his people were rather surprised that he did not appear at his usual time, so his head wife knocked at his door. Not receiving any answer she called the household together, and they broke open the door. When they entered the room they found the king lying dead on his bed covered in blood, but his head was missing. At this a great shout went up, and the whole town mourned. Although they missed the pretty stranger, they never connected her in their minds with the death of their king, and were quite unsuspicious of any danger, and were unprepared for fighting.

In the middle of the mourning, while they were all dancing, crying, and drinking palm wine, the King of Itu with all his soldiers attacked Old Town, taking them quite by surprise, and as their leader was dead, the Calabar people were very soon defeated, and many killed and taken prisoners.


Peul woman in Northern Cameroon, Peul women are known for their beauty
A beautiful face often hides a sinister secret.

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