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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Friday, April 26, 2013

Pomade d'Hebe African Beauty Treatments

These easy Homemade African all natural face masks for smoother softer skin and are the perfect recipe for your spa night at home. The mixture of crushed flowers and honey is a relaxing pampering treatment. Create a homemade mask to help lessen crow’s feet and laugh lines.


To make Pomade d'Hebe skin softening African beauty treatment:
Pomade d'Hebe skin softening African beauty treatment·        Melt one ounce of shea butter on gentle heat
·        Then add one finely crushed lily bulb
·        Add 2 teaspoons honey
·        ½ teaspoon rose-water
·        Two drops of dew from a rose pedal
·        Apply evenly to your face and throat, except eye lids and lips and leave on for 15 minutes.
·        Rinse well with warm water and pat dry.

·        Use twice a day.

To make Pomade d'Hebe skin moisturizing African beauty treatment:
·        Warm 2 tablespoons honey
Pomade d'Hebe skin moisturizing African beauty treatment·        Two drops of dew from a rose pedal
·        Whip egg and mix with two drops of dew from a rose pedal
·        Add mixture to honey and mix well
·        Apply evenly to your face except eye lids and lips and leave on for 20 minutes.
·        Rinse well with warm water and pat dry.

·        Use twice a day.

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Thursday, April 25, 2013

Maasai Bride Inkarewa Wedding Collar

Maasai women beaded wedding collar

Maasai women wedding day
Bead working has a rich history among the Maasai women on her wedding day wearing an elaborate Maasai beaded wedding collar
Bead working has a rich history among the Maasai women

Maasai brides wear an elaborate beaded wedding collar or inkarewa on her wedding day.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




All About Maasai Brides beaded wedding collar


African jewelry is created from a wide variety of materials. 

Generally, African jewelry is made from materials that are immediately available to the artist in their community. White beads created from clay, shells, ivory, or bone. Black and blue beads fashioned from iron, charcoal, seeds, clay, or animal horns. Red beads came from seeds, woods, gourds, bone, ivory, copper, or brass.

Maasai Women photo by neate photosThe style of African jewelry is as wide and varied as the continent of Africa. African jewelry is created for more than personal adornment by the wearer; it also designates rank, class, affluence, rites of passage and tribal association. Certain kinds of jewelry are worn only by men or by women.

Bead working has a rich history among the Maasai women. The Maasai communicate their identity and position in Maasai society through body decorations and body painting. Maasai women wear elaborate ensembles of beaded clothing and adornment, including necklaces and ear ornaments. Marriage in traditional Maasai tribes is an arranged event.  The elders arrange marriages and brides are married off for a dowry of cattle which is the measure of wealthy in Maasai society.


The bride wears her marriage collar or “inkarewa“on her wedding day. The Maasai inkarewa is created with a sense of honor and fine artistry since the bridal collar is thought to be a reflection on the bride. Similarly, in the United States a brides wedding dress sets the tone for the entire wedding party.



Did you know?
Maasai women inkarewa worn her wedding day is one of the most important piece of wedding day attire.

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Tuesday, April 23, 2013

The Truth About Reliable Affordable Electricity in Africa

The Truth Aboubt Reliable Affordable Electricity in Africa

Electricity in Africa
Electricity is all around us but two out of three people in below the Sahara desert in Africa lack access to electricity. In economics, the efficiency of electricity and electrification links technological progress.

Educational opportunities are restricted by daylight for 662 million people in Africa. Learn the truth about reliable affordable electricity in Africa.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




The period of reliable and affordable electrification of industries and households in Africa will be one of highest productivity and economic growth eras in the continents history.


In economics, the efficiency of electrification links technological progress. The African continent is gifted with fossil fuels and renewable energy resources however; nearly 662 million Africans lack access to electricity and a life without electricity is a life with limited opportunities. Entrepreneurs cannot count on consistent power to operate equipment or access tools for communications and market development. Educational opportunities are restricted by daylight.
Cooking on a wood powered stove

Power Africa Project
Power Africa’s approach considers three related but distinct challenges to bringing the projects vision to life. Power must be available, meaning sufficient megawatts must be generated to meet people’s needs. It must be accessible, so that even those communities that cannot be connected to national grids can still access electricity. And it must meet basic quality considerations, meaning natural resources and megawatts generated are efficiently managed to ensure optimal use.

According to the Africa Energy Outlook 2014 the electricity access in Africa is as follows 


Two out of three people in sub-Saharan Africa lack access to electricity.



Did you know?
Two out of three people in sub-Saharan Africa lack access to electricity.

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Tuesday, April 9, 2013

Liberian Spicy Bitter Leaf Stew

Vernonia amygdalina or Bitterleaf is a widely used cooking vegetable throughout Africa. 


Bitterleaf Stew is not bitter as suggested by the name but a delicious mix of beef, fish, chicken, pork and shellfish, served over fufu. Bitter leaf leaves alone have a bitter taste and are sold fresh or dried. 

The leaves are green with a robust odor and a bitter taste. The Yorubas call bitter leaf Ewuro and the Igbos Onugbu, every part of the plant is beneficial from the stem, leaves, and root. 

Liberian Spicy Bitter Leaf Stew


 African Recipes by

Liberian stews are unlike most recipes, Liberian stews are hearty stews that combine numerous meats, fish, and vegetables in one stew. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:


Liberian Spicy Bitter Leaf Stew

Ingredients:
5 ounces of cubed beef
5 ounces of pork or pork sausage
2 skinless chicken thighs
3 smoked fish, flaked
1/2 pound peeled and deveined shrimp
1/4 cup palm oil (optional if you are cooking palm oil free)
3 garden eggs (small eggplants) cut into quarters
2 bunches scallions, finely chopped
1 punch bitter leaf, chopped
1 very hot pepper, chopped
Water to cover

Directions:
Add all ingredients except shrimp to a large pot over medium heat cover ingredients with water. Reduce heat to low and simmer 1 hour. Add shrimp and continue to simmer another 15 minutes.


Did you know...?
Bitter leaf grows in a large range of biological zones in Africa, produces many leaves, and is drought tolerant. Bitter leaf leaves have been used in African traditional folk medicine to stimulate the digestive system, lower blood sugar, antimalarial and reduce fever.

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Chic African Culture Featured Articles

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.

A good teacher can inspire hope, ignite the imagination, and instill a love of learning.
Be the good

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

Wise Words


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.