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Thursday, September 1, 2011

DIY African Love Spell

African spell casters use chants along with everyday household items and plants to cast love spells. Still to this day, many South Africans have a strong belief in the powers of spell casters. Here is an easy DIY African Love Spell.



Do it yourself four-day binding love spell from Dr. Sadik, a Southern African spell caster.

DIY African Love Spell
DIY African Love Spell

DIY African Love Spell


Ingredients
Two small red apples
Long strong sewing needle
Strong white thread
Handful of bitterleaf leaves
1 cup honey
Two candles; white and blue
White paper and pen or pencil
6 cups water and a large bowl

Directions
Write down the names of you and your lover on a piece of paper.

Rub the candles with honey.

Light the candles and place them on the candle stands.

Burn the paper, mix with honey, and smear the apples with the mixture.

With the needle and white thread, insert through the middle of the honeyed apples, tie them together tight.

Continue rubbing the apples with honey and speak from your heart about your lover.
Then get a handful of bitterleaf leaves and crush with your hands in the bowl of water.

DIY African Love SpellWash your body and repeat the same words you said earlier.

Then place the apples in your room.

Early each morning for four-days rub the apples with honey again and put them in the sun.

At the end of four days, you will see your results from the binding love spell.


Did you know?

Bitterleaf is one of the widely used cooking vegetables in Africa and grows in any part of the world. Visit a Caribbean market in your neighborhood to find bitterleaf. 


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