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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

Rice and Beans Ghana Style

Waakye Rice and Beans Ghana Style


African recipes by African Gourmet
    
Waakye is a popular easy to make Ghanaian dish of rice and beans and is a meal itself or served as a side with boiled eggs, salad, grilled fish, chicken, goat, pasta or vegetables.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:
   

Ingredients:

2 cups white rice

2 15.5 ounce cans red beans

1 medium onion, chopped

2 teaspoons garlic salt

2 teaspoons shito (pepper) sauce or 1 chopped hot pepper

½ teaspoon baking soda or 2 dry sorghum leaves

4 cups water

Directions:

In a large pot add all ingredients and simmer until rice is cooked about 30 minutes. Serve with boiled eggs, grilled fish, chicken, goat or vegetables.


Waakye is a popular easy to make Ghanaian dish of rice and beans.










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Sunday, September 19, 2010

Cameroon the hinge of Africa

The Republic of Cameroon Mount Cameroon, the highest mountain in Sub-Saharan West Africa.
The former French Cameroon and part of British Cameroon merged in 1961 to form the present country. The Republic of Cameroon has generally enjoyed stability, which has permitted the development of agriculture, roads, and railways, as well as a petroleum industry.


Cameroon is also referred to as the hinge of Africa; throughout the country there are areas of thermal springs and indications of current or prior volcanic activity; Mount Cameroon, the highest mountain in Sub-Saharan West Africa, is an active volcano.

Below are some interesting facts about The Republic of Cameroon:

Nationality:
Noun: Cameroonian(s)
Adjective: Cameroonian

Ethnic groups:
Cameroon Highlanders 31%, Equatorial Bantu 19%, Kirdi 11%, Fulani 10%, Northwestern Bantu 8%, Eastern Nigritic 7%, other African 13%, non-African less than 1%

Religions:
Indigenous beliefs 40%, Christian 40%, Muslim 20%

Languages:
24 major African language groups, English (official), French (official)

Location:
Western Africa, bordering the Bight of Biafra, between Equatorial Guinea and Nigeria

Area - comparative:
Slightly larger than California

Border countries:
Central African Republic, Chad, Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, and Nigeria

Climate:
Current Weather varies with terrain, from tropical along coast to semiarid and hot in north

Terrain:
Diverse, with coastal plain in southwest, dissected plateau in center, mountains in west, plains in north

Elevation extremes:
Lowest point: Atlantic Ocean 0 m
Highest point: Fako 4,095 m (on Mt. Cameroon)

Natural hazards:

Volcanic activity with periodic releases of poisonous gases from Lake Nyos and Lake Monoun volcanoes

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Monday, September 13, 2010

Ethiopian Berbere Spice Blend Recipe

Spice Blend Recipe

Ethiopian Berbere Spice Recipe

Create our easy homemade Ethiopian Berbere spice blend at home.

Learn to make Ethiopian African Spice Blend Recipe, there are more exciting spices in your food life than just salt and pepper.

By
African food recipe
Ethiopian Berber spice blend

Save money and make organic Ethiopian Berbere spice blend at home without additives or preservatives.



Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 2 minutes

Ethiopian Berber spice blend

Rated 4.5/5 based on 167 customer reviews

Ingredients:
1/2 cup ground dried spicy chiles
1/4 cup paprika
1 teaspoon ground powdered ginger
1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom
1/2 teaspoon ground coriander
1/2 teaspoon fenugreek seeds
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground allspice

Directions:
Finely grind fenugreek seeds and combine well with remaining ingredients



3 Berbere Facts


Berbere is a hot spice blend that is an integral ingredient in Ethiopian cuisine.

Berbere name means hot in Amharic.

Berbere is pronounced bear-bear-ee.


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Sunday, September 5, 2010

Visualizing African Politics

Tayo Fatunla is a Nigerian caricaturist, teacher, storyteller, and illustrator as well as one of Africa's leading comic artists. 


Fatunla holds exhibitions, cartoon workshops and is an internationally published storyteller, cartoonist and illustrator. Fatunla produced cartoons for the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and the human history and culture institution the British Museum. Fatunla published two books on black history, Our Roots and Thro’ The Years. Tayo Fatunla a Nigerian caricaturist and illustrator speaks about African Political Cartooning.

Police of the world political cartoon from 1905
Tayo Fatunla is a Nigerian cartoonist, author, and activist. When Fatunla draws an editorial cartoon, also known as a political cartoon he creates an illustration designed to convey a social or political message. 
In societies around the world, not knowing how to read or write or having a lack of creditable knowledge about a particular subject, visual expression of a social or political message is important to convey and send a clear message using images which will be familiar to all people. 


Visual expression of African politics, Tayo Fatunla speaks about political cartooning. 




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Thursday, September 2, 2010

Picking Cotton in Modern Day Africa

African Cotton Economy

Cotton is King in Benin






Picking Cotton in Modern Day Africa


Where is Benin



Present day Benin was the site of Dahomey, a West African kingdom that raised to prominence in about 1600 and over the next 250 years became a regional power, largely based on its slave trade.

Benin is located in Western Africa, bordering the Bight of Benin, between Nigeria and Togo. Benin is slightly smaller than Pennsylvania. The languages of Benin include French the official language, Fon and Yoruba, and numerous tribal languages.


The population of Benin is mainly located in the south, with the highest concentration of Beninese people living in and around the cities on the Atlantic coast. Most of the north of Benin remains sparsely populated with higher concentrations of residents in the west. Nevertheless, no matter Beninese people live, almost half the population is dependent on cotton to earn a living.


Cotton in Benin



The economy of Benin is dependent on subsistence agriculture, cotton production, and regional trade.
Benin cotton
The economy of Benin is dependent on subsistence agriculture, cotton production, and regional trade. An insufficient electrical supply continues to adversely affect Benin's economic growth though the government recently has taken steps to increase domestic power production.

Benin, which was a leading global producer of cotton between 2004 and 2006, has since experienced a sharp fall in production. Cotton exports have not been able to recover its former output levels.

The Benin government has also taken over the export of cotton and cottonseed. After a difficult period, production is now once again getting under way, but with output likely to be below Benin’s glory days as King of Cotton.


Picking Cotton


In Benin, large cotton plantations or farms are dedicated to growing cotton. Picking cotton in Benin without machinery is very hot, hard, physical work where women work the same hours as men. At harvest time, pickers are expected to pick a certain amount of cotton each day or they do not earn enough money to support their families. Most work as field hands on cotton plantations. Today raw cotton is processed in the state's grain mills which the picker must pay for the use of the mill.

Cotton pickers can work in the fields from sunrise to sunset and at harvest time; they might work an 18-hour day. At harvest time, the cotton bolls are collected into large sacks and weighed. A good picker can harvest 100-300 pounds of cotton in a day. This size of harvest would consist of one-third fibers and two-thirds seeds. Harvesting is mechanized today on some larger farms.


Cotton is still King in the African country of Benin, cotton accounts for nearly 40 percent of the country's revenue. Cotton provides an income to roughly three million people however; cotton productivity and profitability have declined in recent years due, in part, to poor governmental management practices and piracy against commercial shipping in its territory off the Port of Cotonou.

Nigna Latifa and Dadjan Wassinatou carrying harvested cotton to be deseeded. Burkina Faso, Africa.

Cotton in Benin Africa Three Facts



Cotton is Benin’s most important cash crop.

Cotton is highly susceptible to pests such as cotton bollworm, and more pesticides are used on it per unit than on any other crop. Organic farming is catching on but relies on farmers rotating their crops, which takes time, and monitoring insects.

Cotton has mainly been farmed in Benin using agrochemicals including, in some cases, the banned insecticide endosulfan, to raise yields.

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