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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Tribal Beauty | Ndebele Distinct Cultural Identity

Tribal Beauty Southern African Ndebele Distinct Cultural Identity

Ndebele cultural identity



Southern African Ndebele people maintained the use of the isiNdebele language, rituals, customs and art forms as a means of asserting their African Ndebele identity and resistance to outsiders.

Ndebele African Tribal Beauty


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



The Nguni tribes represent nearly two thirds of South Africa's Black population divided into four distinct groups; the Central Nguni (the Zulu-speaking peoples), the Southern Nguni (the Xhosa-speaking peoples), the Swazi people from Swaziland and adjacent areas and the Ndebele people of the Northern Province and Mpumalanga.

Traditionally the Ndebele wife would wear rings called idzila as a status symbol around her arms, legs and neck.Traditionally the Ndebele wife would wear rings called idzila as a status symbol around her arms, legs and neck. These outward symbols can be removed only in case of death of the spouse. Idzila were worn by the wife to embody her until death do us part union and devotion to her husband. 

Husbands used to provide their wives with the idzila rings. The more prosperous husbands could afford to by his wife more idzila rings thus the more rings the wife would wear the greater her status in the Ndebele community.

Today it is no longer common practice to wear these rings permanently. Over time, among the youngest populations this custom to wear the idzila for a lifetime is disappearing. Each African culture is a unique answer to the question of what it means to be human. In today’s rapidly changing world, people from Africa worry about losing their traditional culture, the traditional way of life is getting lost.

One Ndebele beauty custom that has survived the modern way of life is elaborate wall paintings.  The Ndebele wall paintings have a strong symbolic value and are closely linked to the home and to the relationship of the person. Women paint on the outside walls and sometimes also on the interior walls with rich geometric patterns learned from childhood. The walls are changed and repainted in particular moments of family life.

South African Ndebele painting patterns and colorsThe South African Ndebele origins are unknown however, their history can be traced back to chief Mafana in the 1600’s. The Ndebele first officially recorded chief, chief Mafana was succeeded by chief Mhlanga. The Ndebele second chief Mhlanga had a son named Musi who decided to leave his homeland. Chief Mhlanga did not name a heir and after his death his two sons argued over the position and the tribe divided into two divisions, the Manala and the Ndzundza.

Mampuru and 30 men murdered Mampuru's brother Sekhukune on August 23, 1882, he then went into hiding. Commandant General Piet Joubert was ordered to find Mampuru.  Joubert located Mampuru after the Ndzundza tribe women were tortured into revealing his whereabouts at Erholweni Mapochs Caves on October 12, 1882.

It was only after the Boer forces with the aid of other tribal chiefs, surrounded the caves cutting off food and water supplies. Mampuru was sentenced to death and died at the gallows on November 22, 1883 in Pretoria South Africa. The war was ended after eight months and one day, on July 8, 1883.

The First Boer War disturbed the cohesive tribal structure of the Ndzundza-Ndebele when they lost the battle and their tribal lands were confiscated. However, the Ndebele preserved their distinct cultural identity. They maintained the use of the isiNdebele language, rituals, customs and art forms as a means of asserting their cultural identity and resistance to outsiders.

Ndebele wall paintings have strong symbolic value and is closely linked to the home and to the relationship of the person with in. Ndebele Women paint on the outside walls and sometimes also on the interior with rich geometric patterns.

The walls are changed and repainted in particular moments of family life. This art form has developed in the second half of the nineteenth century, using bright of the brightest colors. Earth tones were used in the past.





Did you know?


There are three main groups of Ndebele people; The Southern Transvaal Ndebele (now Gauteng and Mpumalanga) The Northern Transvaal Ndebele (now Limpopo Province) around the towns of Mokopane (Potgietersrus) and Polokwane (Pietersburg). The Ndebele people of Zimbabwe, who were called the Matabele by the British. 

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Thursday, January 21, 2010

Egyptian shay bil na'na' or mint tea

Making Egyptian shay bil na'na' or mint tea from scratch is easy. Egyptian shay bil na'na' or mint tea is dried mint mixed with tea leaves and the mixture is brewed like regular tea.

Egyptian shay bil na'na' or mint tea

Ingredients:
2 sprigs dried mint
3 tablespoons loose tea
3 cups high quality water
Sugar optional

Directions:
In a pot that has a tea diffuser add the tea and mint. Pour the water of water over the tea leaves (boiling water may destroy the taste of your tea leaves if you are using green or white loose tea). Wait for the leaves to infuse, the time depends on your taste, longer brews for a richer taste, shorter for a lighter taste.



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Saturday, January 16, 2010

Sobolo Dried Hibiscus Flowers Red Tea

Sobolo Dried Hibiscus Flowers Red Tea


African Recipes by

Red is the most popular color used on flags in the world, it's also the international color for stop but you won't stop drinking Sobolo, a lively red Ghanaian tea made by steeping dried hibiscus flowers.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients:
1 cup dried hibiscus flowers
4 cups high quality water
Sugar optional

Directions:

In a pot that has a tea diffuser add dried hibiscus. Pour water over the hibiscus. Wait for the hibiscus to infuse turning a beautiful brick red color, the time the flowers steep depends on your taste, longer brews for a richer taste, shorter for a lighter taste.

Ghana Sobolo Dried Hibiscus Flowers Tea photo by hapal

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Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Brief History Of Madagascar

Brief History Of Madagascar

Madagascar
Madagascar is the fourth largest island in the world. Because of its location Madagascar developed in isolation, the African island nation is famed for its unique wildlife.

Brief History Of Madagascar


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Brief glimpse into the history of Madagascar


Madagascar


Harvesting banana leaves in Madagascar 1969
Madagascar was one of the last major regions on earth colonized. The earliest settlers from present-day Indonesia arrived between A.D. 350 and 550. The island attracted Arab and Persian traders as early as the 7th century, and migrants from Africa arrived around A.D. 1000. Madagascar was a pirate stronghold during the late 17th and early 18th centuries, and served as a slave-trading center into the 19th century.

Madagascar, also known as the Republic of Madagascar, is an island in the Indian Ocean found off the southeastern coast of Africa. Formerly an independent kingdom, Madagascar became a French colony in 1896 but regained independence in 1960. The year 1960 witnessed the independence from France of 17 Sub-Saharan African countries and 14 French colonies. 

Madagascar is the fourth largest island in the world after Greenland, New Guinea and Borneo and the home for around 5 percent of the world’s plants and animals. Madagascar has hundreds of types of animals and plants which exist nowhere else such as ring-tailed lemurs.

The World Bank in 2011 estimated 92% of Madagascar’s residents live on less than $2 per day, $430 per household a year. Poverty has put pressure on the island's dwindling forests, home to much of Madagascar's unique wildlife. Losing around 3 acres of forest in Madagascar has a greater impact on global biodiversity than losing 3 acres of forest anywhere else on Earth.

Madagascar is important to the environment of the world. Nearly 80 percent of Madagascar’s population depends on making their living and eating day to day through agriculture. Using slash and burn cultivation techniques, farmers often destroyed what made their home so ecologically important.


Did you know?
About 85 percent of the people in Madagascar lack access to electricity.





A few facts about Madagascar

Population as of 2014
Around 23.5 million

Capital
Antananarivo

Agricultural products produced
Coffee, vanilla, sugarcane, cloves, cocoa, rice, cassava, manioc, tapioca, beans, bananas, peanuts, and livestock products

Nationality
Malagasy

Ethnic groups
Malayo-Indonesian, Cotiers, French, Indian, Creole, and Comoran

Languages
French, Malagasy, English

Religions
Indigenous beliefs 52%, Christian 41%, and Muslim 7%

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Saturday, January 2, 2010

Who Are The Swahili

Who Are the Swahili

Who Are the Swahili in Africa


The Swahili see themselves as neither African nor Asian, but as having their own unique civilization. 


Swahili is the culture of many groups uniquely blended together. 

Lamu has hosted major Muslim religious festivals since the 19th century, and has become a significant center for the study of Islamic and Swahili cultures.

Swahili was given its name by the Arabs in the 16th century, the Swahili words "Watu wa Pwani or people of the coast.” For centuries, Swahili’s were merchants between the interior of Africa to the coast, dealing mainly in ivory, and slaves from Africa and in textiles and beads from Asia. Swahili identity is unique. The Swahili see themselves as either African or Asian, but as having their own unique civilization.

In the 16th century the Omani influences on Swahili culture are significant. The Omani introduced many Arabic words into the Swahili language, perpetuated the belief that their social status and way of life was superior to that of the Swahili, therefore Arab ancestry became a marker of status. Later, Arab merchants who came in the 19th and 20th centuries married female African slaves.

In time, the Arabs and the slaves adopted the Swahili language and became "Swahili" themselves, although the differences in family linage are always recognized. Non-Muslim local inhabitants were named, "The People of the Coast", given to them by the rulers of the Sultanate of Zanzibar, who looked down on the local inhabitants and gave them this offensive name; the Swahili rarely use this name.

A number of people believe there are four groups of Swahili people; people who claim per Arab lineage, parents are original Swahili people, children born in a family where Arabs intermarried with Swahili people, and people who were born elsewhere but integrated into the Swahili culture.  


By the Swahili shore by murky1Lamu Old Town is located on Kenya's Coast Province in the Lamu District. Lamu has hosted major Muslim religious festivals since the 19th century, and has become a significant center for the study of Islamic and Swahili cultures. 

Swahili Lamu Old Town has continuously been inhabited for over 700 years, for this reason, Lamu Old Town is an UNESCO World Heritage site. Lamu Old Town is the oldest and best-preserved Swahili settlement in East Africa, retaining its traditional functions. 

Lamu Museum and Lamu Fort develop and strengthen programs on Swahili culture in universities and colleges in Lamu in order to ensure diffusion of the Swahili culture. Lamu is one of the best East African representatives of the unique Swahili culture, resulting from interaction between the Bantu, Arabs, Persians, Indians and Europeans.

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Friday, January 1, 2010

Moroccan Almond Honey Chicken Recipe

Moroccan Honey Chicken Recipe
Moroccan Chicken

Moroccan food is considered as one of the most diverse foods around the globe.




Moroccan Honey Chicken Recipe
Morocco is one of the most visited African countries throughout time and history and one of the main reasons Morocco remains popular is because of the food.

How to Make Moroccan Almond Honey Chicken


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture

Berber outdoor market in Morocco
By
Moroccan African food recipe

Moroccan Honey Chicken, the food of Morocco is a mix of Berber, Moorish, Middle Eastern, Mediterranean and African cuisines. The cooks in the royal kitchens of Fez, Meknes, Marrakech, Rabat and Tetouan refined Moroccan food over the centuries and created the basis for what is known as Moroccan food recipes today.

Moroccan Almond Honey Chicken

Serves 6
African food

Ingredients
2 teaspoons butter
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1 chicken cut into pieces
2 chopped medium onions
1 chopped clove garlic
1 cup ground almonds
1 teaspoons dried basil
1/2 teaspoons pepper
1/2 cup honey
1 1/2 cups of chicken broth
2 teaspoons. corn starch
1 lemon for juice

Directions
1. In a casserole heat butter and vegetable oil and brown chicken.
2. Season with salt and pepper and remove.
3. In the remaining fat cook onions and garlic until translucent.
4. Add next 4 ingredients, cook over gentle heat stirring until well mixed.
5. Combine the broth and cornstarch and add to the contents of the casserole over high heat.
6. Cook and stir sauce thickens.
7. Remove from heat and stir in lemon juice.
8. Replace chicken, spooning sauce over chicken.
9. Bake in covered preheated oven at 350ยบ for 1 hour.


Did you know?
Moroccan Honey Chicken Recipe

The highest population density in Morocco is found along the Atlantic and Mediterranean coasts; a number of densely populated areas are found scattered through the Atlas Mountains. The Atlas Mountains have long been home to some of North Africa's most remote villages.

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