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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Sunday, November 29, 2009

Ananse Means Teller of Stories and Spider in Akan

Ananse carrier of messages teller of stories and means spider in Akan. This is why the carrier of messages or stories is usually depicted as a spider.

Ananse is very clever and can change into many forms of life. Being so clever Awuku also goes by the name Ananse or Anansi the great spider, owner of all of the stories of the Gods, swift messenger of Nyame the sky God who knows all and sees all. Awuku (ah-woo’-koo) is the communicator of information between the mortal and divine. 

Ananse carrier of messages teller of stories and means spider in Akan. This is why the carrier of messages or stories is usually depicted as a spider.
Ananse carrier of messages teller of stories 
The Akan Awuku opens the mouth of the departed so that they may be able to communicate with Gods. Awuku is also known as the creator of clever and cunning acts. Being so clever Awuku also goes by the name Ananse the great spider, owner of all of the stories of the Gods, swift messenger of Nyame the sky God who knows all and sees all. Awuku or Ananse carries messages for the great mother Nyamewaa and father Nyame who are the Supreme Being.



Let us break down the name Ananse:


ANANSE

ANAN means foot in Akan.
SE in Akan means to say, speak, or tell.


Therefore, Ananse is the carrier of messages and teller of stories. Ananse is the one who tells all delivering messages for Nyame the sky God, who knows all and sees all. Ananse is very clever so of course he has many, many alias all over the world:


  • Ananse
  • Kwaku Ananse
  • Aunt Nancy
  • Nanzi
  • Bru Nansi
  • Annancy
  • Anancyi
  • Anansi
  • Ananansa
  • Ananse
  • Anansi Drew
 


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Saturday, November 28, 2009

Curried Vegetable Couscous a Healthy African Dinner in 30-minutes

Curried Couscous Recipe

Curried Couscous Recipe


Confused about couscous also known as kuskus? The dish is a primary staple throughout North Africa and is a Healthy African Dinner in ready in under 30-minutes.


Curried Vegetable Couscous

It’s both a name for wheat-grain semolina, appearing in many supermarkets today as simply couscous, and for a spicy chicken-vegetable stew served with cooked semolina that’s popular throughout North Africa.

Traditional couscous requires considerable preparation time and is usually steamed and fluffed to separate the couscous granules. In many places, a more-processed, quick-cook couscous is available and is particularly valued for its short preparation time.

Couscous is traditionally served under a meat or vegetable stew. It can also be eaten alone, flavored or plain, warm or cold, as a dessert or a side dish.


Curried Couscous Recipe


Ingredients
2 teaspoons butter
16 ounce can reduced-sodium fat-free vegetable broth
1/3 cup water
1 teaspoon curry powder
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
10 ounce package couscous
1 cup frozen cut carrots

Directions
Bring the butter, broth, carrots and water to boil in a medium saucepan. Gradually stir in curry powder, allspice and couscous. Remove from heat, cover and let stand for 10 minutes. Fluff couscous with a fork serve warm as a side dish for lamb, chicken or for a vegetarian option serve with grilled vegetables.



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Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Ewe (awa) Proverb

Ewe (awa) Proverb


Akpa le tome gake menya tsi fe vevie nyenyeo. (Ewe)

A fish is in water but does not know the importance of water. (English translation)




What does it mean?

The meaning of this proverb is that a fish is always in the water, but until it comes out of the water it doesn’t even recognize that the water exists. This proverb is about “taking things for granted” and similar to the saying that familiarity brings discontent.


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Friday, November 20, 2009

Primary school enrollment in Africa for girls

Primary school enrollment in Africa is among the lowest in the world. Limited funds and a lack of adequate teachers, classrooms, and learning materials adversely affect the educational environment throughout most of Africa.


Out-of-school children in sub-Saharan

Primary school enrollment in Africa for girls


Africa, girls account for a majority of the approximately 33 million primary school-aged children who are not enrolled in school. Educational programs emphasize relevant content, institutional capacity building, and the long-term sustainability of the partnerships between African institutions and American counterparts.

Six American universities that serve mainly minorities are collaborating with African Ministries of Education, universities, and various local nongovernmental organizations to develop and produce textbooks and learning materials that fulfill the priority needs of the host country's educational system.

Out-of-school children in sub-Saharan

In 2009, sub-Saharan Africa was home to 21.6 million, or 30 percent, of all lower secondary school-age children who are out of school worldwide. Within the region, 40 percent of all lower secondary school-age girls and 33 percent of boys were out of school.

Female teachers in sub-Saharan Africa


The percentage of female teachers in primary schools varies widely: In Botswana, Lesotho and South Africa in 2007 around 78 percent of primary school teachers were women, compared to 33 percent in Comoros and 34 percent in Mozambique. In secondary school, 50 percent or more of the teachers were women in 6 out of 13 countries.


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Wednesday, November 18, 2009

Guinea-Bissau is a Major Cashew Nut Producer

Guinea-Bissau is the world's fifth-largest cashew exporter behind India, Vietnam, Ivory Coast and Brazil and a major exporter of illegally logged African Rosewood. Average daily consumption of the Guinea-Bissau people is .85 cents, which means the average amount of money people live on in Guinea-Bissau, is .85 cents per day. The World Bank defines extreme poverty as living on no more than $1.25 per day. It is not surprising to see a potentially profitable illegal logging of African Rosewood emerge in a society with such high levels of poverty.


The Republic of Guinea-Bissau exports cashew nuts, shrimp, peanuts, palm kernels, sawn timber particularly illegal logging of African Rosewood. Guinea-Bissau is one of the world's biggest producers of cashew nuts however; profitable illegal logging of African Rosewood caused a decrease in the price of cashews, which is Guinea-Bissau’s main export.

Cashew Nut Tree by JoostBeljon
The country's vital cashew nut crop provides a meek living for most of Guinea-Bissau's farmers and is the main source of foreign exchange. During the March-May cashew nut harvesting season, nearly 80% of the country’s 1.6 million people are involved in cashew nut production. The country is the world's fifth-largest cashew exporter behind India, Vietnam, Cote D'ivoire and Brazil.


In November 2009 and August 2011 Gibson Guitar Corporation in Nashville was raided by agents with the Fish and Wildlife Service federal authorities for its alleged use of making guitars from illegally sourced endangered trees. Henry Juszkiewicz, the chairperson and chief executive of Gibson Guitar stated, "The wood the government seized Wednesday [August 2011] is from a Forest Stewardship Council certified supplier.”


Other Facts about Guinea-Bissau:
  • Portuguese is the official language of Guinea-Bissau
  • The median age 20 years old
  • Guinea-Bissau is slightly less than three times the size of US Connecticut
  • Since independence from Portugal in 1974, Guinea-Bissau has experienced considerable political and military upheaval.

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Saturday, November 14, 2009

Teaching Simple African Words to Children

It is surprisingly easy to teach simple African words to children since infants and very young children are able to discern the sounds of the world's countless dialects and languages. Their still forming brains are in fact prepared to learn more than one language. 


Take multicultural learning beyond your borders and into Africa and teach easy Malagasy words to a child.
My First African Words


The words featured in this article are of Madagascar’s standard dialect. Take multicultural learning beyond your borders and into Africa and teach easy Malagasy words to a child.

Teaching Simple African Malagasy Words to Children
Teaching Simple African-Malagasy Words to Children








Interesting Facts About Madagascar:

·        Malagasy (mal-uh-gas-ee) is the national language of Madagascar.

·        Madagascar gets its current name from the 14th-century explorer Marco Polo.

·        The baobab tree can be considered the national tree of Madagascar along with countless wildlife species native only to the island.

·        Madagascar is slightly less than twice the size of Arizona and is the world’s fourth-largest island.

·        Malagasy is the nationality of the Madagascar people as well as the name of their language. English, French, and Malagasy are the official languages of Africa.


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