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Established 2008 Chic African Culture teaches the history of African-food recipes and African-cultures, art, music, and oral literature.

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The person who is not patient cannot eat well-cooked dishes. -African Proverb

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Eco-friendly Kitchen

Go green and become an environmentally responsible household. Eco-friendly kitchens begin with eating organically homegrown produce. Create a culture of environmental responsibility beginning with your kitchen. 


The food you carry in to your home is just as important as the appliances you prepare your meals with, so whenever possible grow your own food. 

Eco-friendly kitchens begin with eating organically homegrown produce. Create a culture of environmental responsibility beginning with your kitchen. Organic vegetables are not hard to grow. Hearty plants such as okra, sweet potatoes and pole beans grow rapidly. 

Lettuce is also simple to plant and goes from seed to plate within a few short weeks. Consider the amount of household waste produced by store bought produce vs. homegrown. 

Store bought produce uses containers and packaging to store produce while homegrown produce uses none. Composting is also a great way to reduce carbon footprints. Growing your own food saves fuel and adds in recycling efforts. Composting uses organic material that can be used as a soil amendment to grow more produce that is organic. The cycle continues.


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Wednesday, April 29, 2009

You and Africa Have More in Common Than You Think

Africa's Influence On Southern USA Cooking

African Food, Culture and History
African and Southern American cooking are uniquely tied by food, culture and history. The culture of African and Southern American cooking are also similar in the manner in which recipes are passed down from generation to generation.

Africa's Influence On Southern USA Cooking

Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture



Slaves from Africa in the South represented about 33 percent of the total southern population.


Frying is not ingenious to African cookingThe population of the Southern United States is made up of many different people from the African continent. In 1619, the Dutch introduced the first 20 captured Africans to America by way of Jamestown Virginia. In the 17th and 18th centuries, black slaves worked mainly on the tobacco, rice and indigo plantations of the Southern coast. Between 1774 and 1804, the northern states abolished slavery, but the so-called “peculiar institution” remained vital to the South. Slaves in the South represented about 1/3 of the total southern population. The vast majority of slaves labored in the fields, while a select few worked in the "big house".

Africa had a major influence on Southern cooking. Cooking methods such as stewing may stem from African cooking traditions.One vegetable plant cooked in the big house stands out from the rest as being quintessentially African and Southern, the mighty okra plant. From Ethiopia to West Africa to West Virginia to Texas, okra is an essential cooking ingredient. Okra was cultivated in Egypt for many hundreds of years; one of the earliest accounts of okra is by the Spanish in Egypt in 1216. Hibiscus esculentus or okra is of African origin originating from Ethiopia. Okra grows wild along the White Nile and the upper Nile country as well as in Ethiopia. As most Africans and Southerners know, okra is rarely cooked alone except when fried.

Cooking methods such as stewing and barbequing may stem from African cooking traditions. These slow cooking methods involve making food that requires long simmering periods in order to make food tender. In addition, African cooking just like Southern cooking was born from the economics of survival one-pot cooking, stews, gumbos, thickening with okra or grounded nuts.

Okra is an essential cooking ingredient in Africa and the Southern USAThe culture of African and Southern American cooking are also similar in the manner in which recipes are passed down from generation to generation. Just as it is in Southern cooking, cooking in African culture is an oral tradition and traditional recipes are handed down by word of mouth rather than writing a recipe. African and Southern American cooking are uniquely tied by food, culture and history.

Did you know?
Frying is not ingenious to African cooking, Native Americans taught frying techniques to the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1804-1806.

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Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Interesting facts about Senegal

Interesting facts about Senegal

Senegal in Africa
Interesting fact number one about Senegal, it has a population of over 13 million ranking 69th on the world’s most populous countries.
Senegalese girl

Interesting facts about Senegal


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Population of Senegal is 14,668,522 by July 2017 estimintes

1.       Senegal is located in Western Africa, bordering the North Atlantic Ocean, between Guinea-Bissau and Mauritania.
Women stopping to chat in Velingara Senegal ~ Senegal Street Photography photo by La Rue Joyeuse
Women stopping to chat in Velingara Senegal

2.     It is slightly smaller than South Dakota.

3.     Senegal has a population of over 13 million ranking 69th on the world’s most populous countries.

4.     Senegal's nationality is Senegalese using both the singular and plural form.

5.     Senegal's capital is Dakar which was home to the Dakar Off-Road Rally until 2009 when the race moved to South Africa.

6.     There are 11 regions in Senegal comparable in function to county seats, Dakar, Diourbel, Fatick, Kaolack, Kolda, Louga, Matam, Saint-Louis, Tambacounda, Thies, and Ziguinchor.

7.     The Dutch established a slave port on island of Goree in 1588 and years later in 1659, it became a key slave trading port.

8.     During the Seven Years War 1756–1763, Britain took over French posts in Senegal forming the colony of Senegambia.

9.     Slaves, ivory and gold were exported from the coast during the 17th and 18th centuries.

Senegal’s Patriotic Symbol the African Renaissance Monument is to symbolize the achievement of Africa but some have serious issues with the nudity and symbolism of the 164-foot statue.
African Renaissance Monument
10. In 1960, Senegal exerted its independence from under French rule as an independent nation.

11.   The 40-year reign of Senegal's Socialist Party came to a diplomatic end in the 2000 elections.

12.  Senegal’s Patriotic Symbol the African Renaissance Monument is to symbolize the achievement of Africa but some have serious issues with the nudity and symbolism of the 164-foot statue.

13.  The statue depicts a very muscular man, holding a baby in one hand, leading a voluptuous woman with one exposed breast and supple thighs with the other.

14. Climbing the 216 steps to the African Renaissance Monument you would not immediately discern that local African artists feel unfairly denied the chance to work on a project of national pride.

15. Located in the Senegalese capital of Dakar the African Renaissance Monument cost millions to create, $27 million dollars to be exact.

16. The Senegalese Ex-President, unable to pay the $27 million price tag on the work, gave real estate to North Korea’s Mansudae Overseas Project, which later sold the land at profit in exchange for the statue.

News stand in downtown Dakar Senegal in Africa
News stand in downtown Dakar Senegal in Africa
17.  Languages of Senegal may not surprise you since Senegal was once a French colony, the official language is French, and the other major languages are Wolof, Pulaar, Jola, and Mandinka.

18. Wolof is a language spoken in Senegal, The Gambia, and Mauritania, and it is the indigenous language of the ethnic grouping of the Wolof people.

19. Wolof is the most widely spoken language in Senegal even though the official language is French, by most Senegalese.


20.            Republic of Senegal Motto: "Un Peuple, Un But, Une Foi” "One People, One Goal, One Faith"



Did you know?
Senegal population is concentrated in the western part of the country; approximately 70 percent of the population is rural.

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Monday, April 27, 2009

West African Fried Peanut Onion Fritters

West African Fried Peanut Onion Fritters

West African Fried Peanut Onion Fritters

African recipes by African Gourmet

Discover our delicious warm and crisp West African Fried Peanut Onion Fritter recipe to serve as a snack or appetizer at your next party.

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:
 
Ingredients:

1 cup all-purpose flour

¼ cup chopped shelled peanuts

3 tablespoons creamy peanut butter

1 large egg

¼ teaspoon baking soda

¼ teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon onion powder

1 small onion, finely chopped

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon salt

¼ cup water

Oil for frying


Directions:

Mix all ingredients well, drop 1 tablespoon at a time of the mixture into hot oil and fry until golden brown 2-3 minutes. Drain on paper towels. Serve as a snack or appetizer.
West African Fried Peanut Onion Fritters
West African Fried Peanut Onion Fritters

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Saturday, April 25, 2009

Spicy Ostrich Stew

What does Ostrich meat taste like? Ostrich meat tastes like beef. Ostrich Meat is a red meat low in fat and is used in any recipe using red meat. Ostrich meat is used for frying, stewing, sautéing or in any of dish as a substitute for beef. Ostrich meat is very lean with very low fat content and is a healthier red meat.
 

Spicy Ostrich Stew

South Africa
Spicy Ostrich Stew
Yield 6-8 servings
Ingredients:
4 cloves garlic crushed
2 cups peeled yam cut into 1 ″ cubes
3 cups fresh green beans
1 ½ pounds cleaned ostrich
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 medium onion, sliced
2 teaspoons coriander
2 tablespoons red pepper flake
2 cups beef stock
1 cup whole stewed tomatoes
Salt and pepper to taste

Directions:
In a large pot on medium heat, add oil then sauté garlic one minute. Add remaining ingredients. Simmer covered for 30 minutes. Serve warm.

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Friday, April 24, 2009

Wedza Papaya Seed Tea Recipe

Papaya Seed Tea Recipe

Papaya Seed, Papaya Tea
The black seeds in the center of a papaya are edible and have a peppery taste making a unique African Wedza Papaya Seed Tea recipe.

Tea time

Papaya Seed Tea Recipe


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Papaya Seeds are usually thrown away but these little black seeds make the best teas.

Papaya is a tropical fruit crop in Kenya, South Africa, Côte d’Ivoire, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.Papaya is a tropical fruit crop in Kenya, South Africa, Côte d’Ivoire, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. It is grown widely both as a commercial crop and in small gardens where it is an important source of nutrition and income. 

Papayas are large oblong shaped tropical fruits with thin skin that are golden yellow when they are ripe and ready to eat. 

The fruit will be slightly soft to the touch and ripe papayas can be yellow, orange, pink or red, depending on the variety. 

Wedza Papaya Seed Tea Recipe

African Wedza Papaya Seed Tea Recipe
African Recipes by

Most people only eat flesh of the papaya, but you can also create tasty teas from the small, black seeds in the cavity of the papaya. 

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:

Ingredients: 
1/2 cup dried papaya seeds 
3 cups water 
lemon and sugar optional

Directions:
Look for richly colored papayas that give slightly to palm pressure. Scoop the seed from the papaya. The seeds are  encased in a gelatinous envelope, I find it best to break them and wash the seed thoroughly. Allow the seeds to dry to completely dry about three days on the counter top. Grind seeds using a food processor or coffee grinder ground papaya seeds have the same consistency as finely ground coffee. Serve hot or chilled.

Did you know?
Papaya seed benefits are numerous, the top two are papaya seeds have antioxidant properties and compounds that may cure parasitic diseases. Papaya seeds are an overlooked superfood.

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Thursday, April 23, 2009

Popular Anansi West African Folktale

Popular Anansi West African Folktale

Popular Anansi Folktale
Anansi is charming as he says to turtle one good meal deserves another.

Popular Anansi West African Folktale


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Read with your child and share wonderful popular African folktales.

Popular Anansi West African Folktale



Printed Version of the Popular Anansi Folktale

One Good Meal Deserves Another

Anansi the Spider hated to share! When Turtle came to his house at mealtime, he said, "I can't give you food until you've washed your dusty feet!"

Turtle licked his lips when he saw the big plate of steaming food, but politely walked to the stream to wash. When he returned, the plate was empty. "Good meal," Anansi said, patting his full stomach.

"One good meal deserves another!" said Turtle. 

"Come to my house for dinner tomorrow." 

Turtle fixed a fine dinner at the bottom of the river. "Come on down and eat!" he said.

Anansi filled his jacket pockets with stones so that he would be weighted down enough to stay at the river's bottom and eat. "It's impolite to wear a jacket to dinner!" Turtle said, "Take it off!"

But when greedy Anansi took off his jacket, he floated back up to the surface of the water and hungrily watched Turtle eat his fill!

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Wednesday, April 22, 2009

How to Eat Fufu

How to Eat Fufu
Making Fufu in Ghana



African Food
For many Africans, stew and fufu is a classic meal similar to soup and crackers in the US.

How to Eat Fufu


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture


FuFu is a staple food of Africa



Conventional West African fufu is made by boiling starchy foods as cassava, yam, plantain or rice then pounding them into a gummy yummy mass. Fufu is a staple food to Western and Central Africa and  is what mashed potatoes are to traditional American cooking.



Conventional West African fufu is made by boiling starchy foods as cassava, yam, plantain or rice then pounding them into a gummy mass. 


Fufu is a staple food to Western and Central Africa and is what mashed potatoes are to traditional American cooking.


For many Africans, stew and fufu is a classic meal similar to soup and crackers in the US. Cocoyam fufu flour is specialty flour specifically formulated to produce instant fufu.


Fufu can be prepared using different basic food materials. Fufu is a staple food to Western and Central Africa and is what mashed potatoes are to traditional American cooking. It can be made using cassava, African yams, potatoes, corn meal, plantains, Rice, and Millet. It reminds me of an unfilled dumpling, almost tasteless but tasty and accompanies any stew.


To eat fufu, tear off a walnut-sized portion of the fufu scoop up stew using your hands and bits of doughy fufu. In West Africa, diners often eat fufu and the stew's sauce first, saving the meat for the end of the meal since it's the most expensive part.


It is traditional to eat using only your right hand, no utensils. If you were to eat with your left hand, it would be both insulting and rude to those around you because usually the left hand is reserved for "bodily functions" and the hand is never used for eating.


By
African food recipe
Plantain Cassava Fufu Recipe
Fufu is a staple food in many West, East and South countries in Africa often made with root vegetables such as cassava and plantains.

Plantain Cassava Fufu Recipe

Serves 4
African food


Ingredients
3 green or yellow plantains
1 medium cassava root
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
1/4-1/2 cup water


Directions

In a large pot place the peeled and evenly cut plantains and cassava and cover with water. Boil until soft about 20 minutes. Place the salt, flour, plantains and cassava in a mixer and whip until the consistency of soft dough is achieved. Foufou should be much stiffer than mashed potatoes in texture. 


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Tuesday, April 21, 2009

Dinka and Nuer Tribes of South Sudan

Dinka and Nuer Tribes of Sudan

Nuer, Dinka
The Sudan was the largest country in Africa until 2011 when Sudan and South Sudan became two separate countries. The Dinka are one of the largest ethnic groups in the Republic of Sudan.

A little girl helps cool off her sister by pouring water over her head in Juba South Sudan.

Dinka and Nuer Tribes of Sudan


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Whether Nuer or Dinka, traditionally the focus for Sudanese people has been a nomadic community, the small communities are made up of extended families based on lineage of male relatives and ancestors. The members of a lineage act in the group's interest, safeguarding territory or forming important ties with other families by marriage. Usually a family leader is a respected elder.

Overview of South Sudan

Sudan lies wholly within the tropics, and with the exception of the Sudd region in the south, and some hilly districts towards its western and eastern extremities, constitutes one vast plain. The extreme north is Saharan in its heat and aridity, but below this, a central belt contains some of the richest agricultural and grazing land in the country, including the Gezira Island between the White and the Blue Niles, traditionally the granary of the Sudan.
Republic of the Sudan

The Republic of the Sudan capital is Khartoum. Sudan is situated in Northern Africa, bordering the Red Sea, between Egypt and Eritrea. The Sudan was the largest country in Africa until 2011 when Sudan and South Sudan became two separate countries. 

Just like most African countries Sudanese backgrounds are very diverse mainly Arab in the north, and African in the south of Sudan. The definition and boundaries of ethnic groups depend on how people perceive themselves and others. The Dinka and the Nuer, the largest groups in southern Sudan, call themselves, Jieng and Naath tribes. The Dinka are one of the largest ethnic groups in the Republic of Sudan.

Family in South Sudan

Nuer Tribe

Nuer people are also known as Abrigar, and Jikany. Nuer tribal people live in the everglade and savanna country on the banks of the Nile River in South Sudan and Ethiopia. The Nuer tribe depends on their abundant cattle, which they also use for marriage bride price and resolving disputes through the mediation of a Nuer elder. However, the Nuer in Ethiopia are small in number and are 80 percent Christian as opposed to the South Sudan Nuer who are large in number and 25 percent Christian.

Dinka Tribe


Dinka also called Jieng, live in the savanna country in South Sudan. Dinka are among one of the tallest tribes in Africa. Dinka were not only farmers and herders, but also law court judges and high public officials and physicians. Today various Dinka tribes preserve their cattle, but many have lost their herds, which were killed in fighting or abandoned during the civil war. Dinka have been among the most deeply affected by the Sudanese civil war.

Cattle has always been the focus of Dinka culture. Cattle stood at the heart of virtually every important tradition and ceremony in Dinka cultural life from music, myths, legends, and folklore, cattle are one of the most important animals. Dinka are one of South Sudan’s largest and noblest tribes.  

Language of South Sudan



Language, cultural characteristics, and common ancestry may be used as markers of ethnic identity or difference, but they do not always define groups of people. Identifying ethnic groups in Sudan was made more complicated by the multifaceted character of internal divisions among Arabic-speaking Muslims, the largest population that might be considered a single ethnic group. 

Languages of Sudan also vary Arabic (official), English (official), Nubian, Ta Bedawie, diverse dialects of Nilotic, Nilo-Hamitic, Sudanic languages.  
Language differences have served as a partial basis for ethnic classification and as symbols of ethnic identity. Such differences have been obstacles to the flow of communication in a state as linguistically fragmented as Sudan.


Food of South Sudan


Cooking in South Sudan


In South Sudan, meals are eaten around a large, communal tray on which various meat, vegetable, salads, and sauce dishes are placed. These are eaten with the right hand, using flat bread or a stiff millet porridge known as asida or kisra. The strong Sudanese coffee is served from a special tin ‘jug’ with a long spout, known as a jebena. 

The coffee is sweet and often spiced with ginger or cinnamon, and is drunk from tiny cups or glasses. Fruit teas and herbal teas such as kakaday (hibiscus tea) are also popular. Peanuts, known as Ful-Sudani, are a popular snack, and can be made into delicious macaroons.


Central Sudan is perhaps the region that is the most diversified and colorful in its cuisine and dietary habits. This is due to its being a melting pot for the different Sudanese cultures and peoples, and to its exposure to external influences, like the effect of the British control during colonialism.


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Monday, April 20, 2009

Swahili words used by Disney, Lionel Richie, and Star Trek


Swahili is spoken in the African countries of Tanzania, Burundi, Kenya, Mozambique, Somalia, Uganda, Democratic Republic of Congo and Rwanda. Swahili is also one of the official languages of Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. About 35% of the Swahili vocabulary derives from the Arabic language.


Did you know…?

1.   Disney's animated film The Lion King contains several Swahili references. Simba, the main character's name, means lion, Rafiki means friend, Sarabi means mirage and Pumbaa means foolish.

 2.   Gene Roddenberry took the name of Lieutenant Uhura in Star Trek from the Swahili word uhuru meaning freedom.

Lionel Richie


  3.   Do you remember Lionel Richie’s 1983 hit song 'All Night Long'? The line “We're going to, party Karamu, fiesta, forever, come on and sing along....Karamu means party in Swahili. 

4.   The game 'Jenga' is derived from the Swahili word kujenga, the Swahili verb to build.
  

5.   The DreamWorks Animation movie 'Madagascar 2', the hippo is named 'Moto Moto' which means 'Hot Hot' in Swahili.

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Sunday, April 19, 2009

Ngai Supreme God of the Gikuyu of Kenya

Origin of Kenya's Gikuyu Tribe


Kere-Nyaga also known as Mount Kenya is a place for prayers and sacrifices. The common name used when addressing “the possessor of all” is Ngai. Numbering about 6 million Gikuyu people are the largest ethnic group in Kenya.

The common name used when addressing “the possessor of all” is Ngai. While praying the Gikuya people address Ngai as Mwene-nyaga. The Gikuyu name for Mount Kenya is also Mwene-nyaga. The Gikuyu God and possessor of all is Mwene-nyaga meaning owner of the snow, possessor of brightness or possessor of the white patch. Mwene-nyaga, lives on Mount Kenya, is also known as Kere-Nyaga. The Gikuyu pray under large sacred trees such as fig trees and this is where Mwene-nyaga is praised and prayers and sacrifices are offered.


Origin of the Gikuyu tribe



Kere-Nyaga also known as Mount Kenya is a place for prayers and scarifies.
Kere-Nyaga also known as Mount Kenya is a
place for prayers and scarifies.
Mogai, the divider of the universe called a man named Gikuyu to him and took him to the top of Kere-Nyaga (Mount Kenya). Mogai pointed out the lush lands and informed the Gikuyu man all is his, if he is ever in need, raise his hands toward Kere-Nyaga and pray.

Mogai provided a wife to Gikuyu named Moombi and they created nine beautiful daughters. However, Gikuyu wanted a son to carry on his name. Mogai told Gikuyu not to worry and make sacrifices to the mountain Kere-Nyaga where the God Ngai lives but he must do this while standing under a fig tree. Mogai told Gikuyu if he did as told he would be blessed with nine handsome strong young men to marry his beautiful nine daughters.

Gikuyu did as he was told making sacrifices to Kere-Nyaga. When he returned to the fig tree in the morning, he found nine young men waiting patiently under the fig tree. The men married Gikuyu’s daughters and continued to live on the land for generations still praying and giving thanks to the mountain Kere-Nyaga where the God Ngai dwells. 

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Saturday, April 18, 2009

North African and Indian South African Ghee Recipe

North African and Indian South African Ghee Recipe

Clarified Butter, Ghee Recipe
Ghee is a clarified butter without any solid milk particles or water. Ghee is used in daily cooking throughout South Africa, Algeria, Egypt, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (Libya), Morocco, Sudan and Tunisia.

African Ghee Recipe

Our Ghee recipe enriches the flavors of both sweet and savory North African and Indian South African foods.


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Ghee can be used in place of butter and is perfect for use as a cooking oil.

North and South African Ghee

African Ghee Recipe

African recipes by African Gourmet

Ghee is a traditional North African and Southern African preparation of clarified butter

Prep time: Cook time: Total time:   Yield about 1 ½ cups

Ingredients:
2 cups unsalted butter

Directions:
Melt the butter in a saucepan over medium-high heat and bring to boil, stirring constantly. Reduce heat to low and simmer 6-7 minutes. Remove from the heat and skim the solids from the butter. When a second foam forms on top of butter, and the butter turns golden brown the ghee is ready. Strain the ghee using cheesecloth and store in airtight container.




Did you know?
Ghee is a clarified butter photo by Chiot's RunThere is no better way to understand a culture than through its food. Food bonds families, friends and communities as well as giving everyday nourishment. African cooking is an oral tradition and traditional recipes were handed down by word of mouth rather than writing a recipe.

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Friday, April 17, 2009

Egypt Red Land Deserts, Green Delta Valleys Black Nile Soils

Egypt Red Land Deserts, Green Delta Valleys Black Nile Soils

Egypt in Africa
Egypt rests on the African continent in Northern Africa, bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Libya and the Gaza Strip, and the Red Sea north of Sudan, and includes the Asian Sinai Peninsula. Its capital is Cairo the time difference is 7 hours ahead of Washington, DC.

Egypt Red Land Deserts, Green Delta Valleys Black Nile Soils


Explore and Understand Africa Through Her Food and Culture




Egypt is the third most populous on the African continent.


Egypt was an independent strong kingdom up until 3200 B.C. Rule of the country was taken over by the Persians in 341 B.C., who in turn were replaced by the Greeks, Romans, and Byzantines. The Arabs in the 7th century ruled for the next six centuries. 

In 1250 the Mamluks took control of Egypt and continued to govern after the conquest of Egypt by the Ottoman Turks in 1517. Britain seized control of Egypt's government in 1882, but continued to work with the Ottoman Empire until 1914. Egypt attained full independence from Britain in 1952.

Farming in Egypt

The Nile Valley is home to the Valley of the Kings, the Pyramids, the Sphinx and temples of Luxor and Karnak. 

The completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1971 and the resultant Lake Nasser have altered the time-honored place of the Nile River in the agriculture and ecology of Egypt. 

The Nile delta encompasses the richest farmland in Egypt and is located in northern Egypt; at the point the Nile touches the Mediterranean Sea. The Nile delta is densely populated around 50 percent of the Egyptian population lives in the Nile delta.

Besides the Nile Valley, the greater part of Egypt's countryside is harsh desert land. High gusting winds are capable of forming sand dunes more than 100 feet high. Egypt includes parts of the Sahara and Libyan Deserts. These deserts were referred to as the "red land" in ancient Egypt, and they protected the Kingdom of the Pharaohs from western threats. 

The Nile Valley was home to one of the oldest cultures in the world, spanning three thousand years of uninterrupted history. Egyptian culture as a whole has 6,000 years of recorded history. Arabs introduced Islam and the Arabic language in the 7th century to Egypt. Egypt is also the third most populous on the African continent and Egypt’s capital city, Cairo, is Africa's largest city and has been renowned for centuries as a center of learning, culture and commerce.

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Chic African Culture Featured Articles

Truth is treason in the empire of lies.

Mental Discovery

The eye never forgets what the heart has seen - African Proverb

Wise Words


A wise person does not fall down on the same hill twice.